Ohio

Population

11,536,504

Population 0‑18

23.7%

Internet Users

69.5%

Home Internet Subscribers

63.8%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2017 - Ohio submitted their Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan to the U.S. Department of Education; this plan consists of three key technology disciplines to be studied by grades K through 12. The three disciplines are the following: Information and Communication Technology, Society and Technology, and Design and Technology.

2018 - The U.S. Department of Education approved Ohio’s ESSA plan on January 16. See 2017 for what Ohio has specifically submitted as their 2017-2018 plan to the DoE.

Also in 2018, Ohio has prepared their education plan for 2019 to 2024 called “EachChild=OurFuture.” This plan aims to have every child graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills to be successful adults. The plan is also a policy informing tool for the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools systems since this plan was made collaboratively by preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, and philanthropic organizations.

Center for P-20 Safety and Security

The Center for P-20 Safety and Security was created in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Education and Ohio Department of Higher Education. It aims to make school as safe as possible and provide resources to students, parents and teachers on issues from preschool to college.

INFOhio

INFOhio is a statewide cooperative school library and information network which aims to support and enrich teaching and learning by providing equitable access to quality resources for Ohio’s PreK-12 community of students, educators and parents. A search on Internet safety brings up a wealth of resources in a variety of media, including videos and books.

Learning.com

Learning.com is a solutions-provider for parents, teachers, and schools to teach them how to become digitally literate with customized plans. Ohio has been provided with Learning.com’s EasyTech Online Safety curriculum for free; the curriculum is now used throughout the state to educate students how to handle cyberbullying and other essential online safety skills.

Ohio Department of Education

The Ohio Department of Education is responsible for all public education in the state, the Department of Education’s website provides information on ongoing and past programs, content standards and teacher requirements.

Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force

The Ohio Human trafficking Task Force works identify and rescue victims, enforce laws and prosecute traffickers, and assist trafficking survivors in reintegrating into their normal lives. The task force consists of ten different state agencies which work together to collaborate and assisted in different areas of trafficking issues.

Ohio Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC)

The ICAC was launched in 1999, the Ohio ICAC now works with over 240 partner law enforcement agencies to apprehend and prosecute Internet child predators and pornographers, whilst also educating children and their parents about online dangers. They teamed up with Shaquille O’Neal in 2011 and developed an iPhone app designed to protect kids online.

Ohio Office of the Attorney General

The Ohio Attorney General’s office provides training for students, parents, teachers, allied professionals, and the general public on Internet safety for students, parents and teachers in partnership with iSAFE. Topics which are covered include online intimidation, cyber-bullying, online predators and digital citizenship.

Ohio Ready to Read (ORTR)

ORTR is a joint initiative between the Ohio Library Council and State Library of Ohio to educate families on the importance of early literacy. Under this program is the “Digital Media Literacy Training,” where mentors learn to teach families and caregivers how to navigate the online world safely and effectively.

Enrollment and Achievement in Ohio's Virtual Charter Schools (2016)

June Ahn

This report looks at the enrollment and achievement in Ohio's Virtual Charter schools. Ohio has one of the largest populations of full time virtual students in the US and some of the findings include the fact that e-school students are similar in race and ethnicity to brick and mortar school students and that almost no students take advanced math courses online compared to face-to-face class students.

Using Social Media to More Effectively Communicate Reform Efforts: A Case Study on the Ohio Department of Education's Use of Twitter (2013)

Reform Support Network

This case study looks at how state and local educational agencies such as the Ohio Department of Education uses social media, specifically Twitter, to increases engagement over traditional forms such as emails and newsletters.

Broadband and Education: Enriching Ohio's Students Through Technology (2012)

Connect Ohio

This report touches on a study Connect Ohio did to understand the tech and education gap in Ohio citing the fact that technology can be a key component of widening education options, improving educational attainment levels, and making Ohio economically competitive. Connect Ohio surveyed rural and nonrural Ohioans about broadband and whether they used the Internet for educational purposes, among other questions.

Profiles in Innovation: How the Enhancing Education Through Technology Program is Improving Teaching and Learning in America's Schools (2011)

The Bernstein Strategy Group

This group of case studies from around the US looks at the status and successes of programs from the federal Enhancing Education Through Technology program. This program was designed to provide students with the skills and tools they need to succeed in the 21st century. Many of the recipients of the funding are in areas that lack access to technology and broadband at home and rely on schools for interactive and engaging learning opportunities.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Sentencing for felonies in Ohio is as follows:

  • Felony of the first degree: three to ten years’ imprisonment and/or $20,000 fine with the possibility of life imprisonment where defined a sexually violent predator.

  • Felony of the second degree: two to eight years’ imprisonment and/or $15,000 fine.

  • Felony of the third degree: one to five years’ imprisonment and/or $10,000 fine.

  • Felony of the fourth degree: six to eighteen months’ imprisonment and/or $5,000 fine.

  • Felony of the fifth degree: six to twelve months’ imprisonment and/or $2,500 fine.

In the event that the law mandates a term of imprisonment, sentences for misdemeanors are as follows:

  • Misdemeanor of the first degree: no more than 180 days’ imprisonment and/or $1000 fine.

  • Misdemeanor of the second degree: no more than 90 days’ imprisonment and/or $750 fine.

  • Misdemeanor of the third degree: no more than 60 days’ imprisonment and/or. $500 fine.

  • Misdemeanor of the fourth degree: no more than 30 days’ imprisonment and/or $250 fine.

  • Ohio Revised Code (OH RC) 2903.211 Menacing by Stalking. This section states that it is a crime to engage in a pattern of conduct which causes another person to fear physical harm or to suffer mental distress. The section also prohibits the use of a computer to incite others to carry out such behavior. This is a misdemeanor in the first degree. Where the victim is a minor or someone acted on messages posted on the Internet to carry out the offense (among other criteria) it is a felony offense in the fourth degree.

  • OH RC 2905.32 Trafficking in Persons. Defines the offense of recruiting, luring, enticing, harboring, transporting, obtaining or maintaining another person knowing that the victim will be compelled to engage in sexual activity, engage in an obscene performance or participate in the production of obscene material. This is deemed to be a second degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.02 Rape. States that it is a criminal offense to engage in sexual conduct with a person using force or with a minor who is under the age of thirteen, among other definitions. This is deemed to be a first degree felony and sentences of up to life imprisonment without parole may be imposed. Where the offender was less than sixteen years of age and did not cause serious physical harm to the victim, the victim was ten years of age or older and the offender has not previously been convicted of a violation of this section, the court shall not impose the penalty of life imprisonment but shall sentence the offender as otherwise provided in this division.

  • OH RC 2907.03 Sexual Battery. States that it is unlawful to engage in sexual conduct with (among others) a minor where the offender is in a position of authority over them. This is defined as a felony in the third degree, except where the minor is under thirteen in which case it is a second degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.04 Unlawful Sexual Conduct with Minor. Defines the crime of a person who is eighteen years or older engaging in sexual conduct with a child who is aged between thirteen and sixteen. This is a felony in the fourth degree, except when the offender is less than four years younger than the victim in which case it is a first degree misdemeanor. Where the offender is more than ten years older than the minor the crime is deemed to be a third degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.05 Gross Sexual Imposition. This section states that it is an offense to engage in sexual conduct with another or to encourage another to do so when (among other criteria) at least one of the actors is under the age of thirteen. Also under this section it is unlawful to touch the genitalia of a child under the age of twelve, with the intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person. This is a third degree felony and carries a mandatory prison term over any other form of punishment.

  • OH RC 2907.06 Sexual Imposition. States that it is a crime for a person over eighteen to have sexual conduct with a minor aged between thirteen and sixteen where the offender is at least four years older than the victim. This is defined as a misdemeanor in the third degree for a first offense and a first degree misdemeanor for any subsequent convictions.

  • OH RC 2907.07 Importuning. Under this section no person shall solicit a minor who is less than thirteen to engage in sexual activity. This is a third degree felony for a first offense, rising to a felony in the second degree for subsequent convictions. It is also unlawful to solicit another adult to engage in sexual conduct with a minor over the age of thirteen but under sixteen. The section includes solicitation by means of a telecommunications device and applies to communications sent or received within the state. This is a felony in the fifth degree for a first offense and carries a mandatory prison term over any other form of punishment. For subsequent convictions the crime is deemed to be a felony in the fourth degree.

  • OH RC 2907.08 Voyeurism. Defines the offense of filming, photographing or being physically present upon the property of another for the purpose of sexual arousal or gratification. The maximum classification for the most serious offense under this section, applying where the other person is in a state of nudity or is a minor, is a fifth degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.09 Public Indecency. States, among other things, that it is a criminal offense to engage in masturbation, sexual conduct or to expose genitalia in public. This is a misdemeanor in the fourth degree unless the behavior was viewed by a minor in which case it is a second degree misdemeanor.

  • OH RC 2907.21 Compelling Prostitution. This section states, among other things, that it is an offense to induce, procure, encourage or solicit a minor to engage in sexual activity for hire, or to pay a minor to engage in sexual activity. Compelling prostitution is a third degree felony, unless the victim is a minor aged sixteen or seventeen, which elevates the offense to a first degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.22 Promoting Prostitution. Classifies the supervision, transport, management or control of prostitutes as a fourth degree felony, unless the victim is a minor in which case promoting prostitution becomes a third degree felony.

  • OH RC 2907.31 Disseminating Matter Harmful to Juveniles. States that it is a crime to offer, sell, distribute or disseminate any material or performance that is obscene or harmful to juveniles. Where the content is obscene this is a felony in the fifth degree but where it is merely harmful to them it is a first degree misdemeanor. If the juvenile who was exposed to the harmful material was under thirteen years of age at the time of the offense it is deemed to be a felony of the fourth degree.

  • OH RC 2907.311 Displaying Matter Harmful to Juveniles. States that no person who has control of a commercial establishment may display material that is harmful to juveniles. This is a first degree misdemeanor with each day that the material is on display constituting a separate offense.

  • OH RC 2907.32 Pandering Obscenity. States that it is unlawful to create, reproduce, publish or promote any material that is considered to be obscene. This section also covers the purchase or control of such material. This is a fifth degree felony for a first conviction and is deemed to be a fourth degree felony offense upon subsequent convictions.

  • OH RC 2907.321 Pandering Obscenity Involving a Minor. It is a crime to create, reproduce, or publish any obscene material that has a minor as one of its participants or portrayed observers. This includes promotion of the material, buying and possessing it. Possession and buying are felonies in the fourth degree for a first offense and felonies in the third degree for subsequent convictions. The other offenses are second degree felonies.

  • OH RC 2907.322 Pandering Sexually Oriented Matter Involving a Minor. This section states that it is an offense to create, publish, publicize, buy or posses any material depicting a minor participating or engaging in a sexual act. Buying, receiving, possessing and soliciting such material is a felony in the fourth degree for a first offense and a felony in the third degree for subsequent convictions. The other offenses covered by this section are deemed to be second degree felonies.

  • OH RC 2907.323 Illegal Use of Minor in Nudity-oriented Material or Performance. States that it is unlawful to photograph a minor, without the consent of the parents, in a state of nudity, or to create, direct, produce, or transfer any material or performance that shows the minor in this state. This is a felony in the second degree and possession of such images is a fifth degree felony offense. A subsequent conviction for possession of such images is a felony in the fourth degree.

  • OH RC 2917.21 Telecommunications Harassment. States, among other things, that it is unlawful to knowingly make or cause to be made a telecommunication, including electronically, which fails to identify the caller to the recipient with intent to harass or abuse the recipient. It is also unlawful to describe, suggest or propose to the recipient that the caller, the victim or any other person engage in sexual activity, when the recipient has previously requested, or now requests, that no such references are being made. The above are deemed to be a misdemeanor for a first offense and a fifth degree felony for any subsequent offenses.

  • OH RC 3313.666 District policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying required. This section defines bullying, intimidation, and harassment as “any intentional written, verbal, electronic, or physical act” that causes mental or physical harm and creates an abusive educational environment. This section also includes requirements for bullying policies in all each city, local, exempted village, and joint vocational school districts.

  • OH RC 3314.21 Internet- or Computer-based Schools. Requires Internet- or computer-based community schools to use a filtering device or install filtering software that protects against Internet access to materials that are obscene or harmful to juveniles. This section also requires the schools to provide free filtering devices or software to students who work from home.