Nevada

Population

2,700,551

Population 0‑18

24.6%

Internet Users

84.3%

Home Internet Subscribers

76.6%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

1997 - Nevada established the Nevada Commission on Educational Technology which oversees educational technology grants, including Nevada Ready 21, which is designed to incorporate technology into students’ daily lives.

2002 - NAC 388 has regulations of distance learning, also known as distance education or virtual education, added to it. Those regulations can be located under the heading “Distance Education.”

2010 - The Nevada Computer and Technology Standards of Classroom Technology Integration for the 21st Century are adopted on May 14. Provided by Nevada’s DOE, the standards in the PDF are a framework to guide districts in creating their curriculum based on the state standards.

2011 - Week of Respect was started to educate students on ways that they can help to prevent bullying and cyberbullying. It is mandated by NRS 236.073 and takes place every year in the first week of October. The week requires schools to teach students about available resources and encourage support for victims of bullying and cyberbullying.

2014 - The Commission on Educational Technology approves a new program called Nevada Ready 21. The initiative aims to give an Nevadan middle and high school students 24 hour access to a laptop, beginning with middle schoolers. The initiative includes digital services for students, as well as technology training for teachers so that they can take full advantage of the program.

2017 - Governor Sandoval signed a bill to codify the Nevada 21 Ready program into state law, continuing funding for the program and expanding applications to a new cohort of schools.

Connect Nevada

Established in 2009 as a subsidiary of Connected Nation and the United States Department of Commerce’s State Broadband Initiative grant, Connect Nevada operates as a nonprofit entity in collaboration with the Nevada Broadband Task Force to work with each statewide broadband provider to create detailed maps of broadband coverage and assess the state of broadband adoption to help communities plan for technology expansion.

Flip the Script

Flip the Script is an initiative launched by the R&R Partners Foundation in 2010. The initiative is in collaboration with the Nevada Department of Education, the Southern Nevada Anti-Bullying Council, the Utah Anti-Bullying Coalition, and the Dion Initiative. Their primary focus is to help students create and implement their own campaigns to encourage and support existing anti-bullying measures.

Nevada Broadband Task Force

Created by former Governor Gibbons in 2009, this task force was charged with identifying and removing barriers to broadband access and identifying opportunities for increased broadband applications and adoption in unserved and underserved areas of Nevada. Re-established in 2015 under the Governor’s Office of Science, Innovation, and Technology (OSIT), they are currently waiting for appointment from Governor Sandoval.

Nevada Commission on Educational Technology

The Commission on Educational Technology oversees educational technology grants, including Nevada Ready 21, which is designed to incorporate technology into students’ daily lives. The Commission consists of 13 members, 11 voting and 2 non-voting, who are appointed by the Legislature and the Governor.

Nevada Institute for Children's Research and Policy (NICRP)

Located at UNLV within the School of Community Health Sciences, NICRP is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to improving the lives of children through research, advocacy and other specialized services. Their mission is to conduct academic and community-based research to guide the development of policies and the improvement of programs and services.

State of Nevada Department of Education (NDE)

The mission of the NDE is to improve student achievement and educator effectiveness by ensuring opportunities, facilitating learning, and promoting excellence. They have a program called Nevada Ready 21 which is a statewide initiative that provides students with an equitable, technology-rich education that supports high standards, an engaging learning environment, and the development of the 21st century skills students will need to prosper while fueling the economic growth of the state. It also provides professional development training and support for the teachers and administrators, broadband internet access in Nevada schools, and 24 hours access to a laptop.

The Office of Nevada Attorney General

The Office of the Nevada Attorney General recognizes that as there are currently over 2 billion internet users worldwide, including 900 million active Facebook users, of which, many are children. Therefore, the Attorney General provides online safety protocol tips as well as other information regarding online crimes.

The Use of Social Media Interactivity Between Nevada E-Government Agencies and The Public: An Analysis of The Role and Impact of Twitter Accounts (2017)

Jung Eun Song

By studying the Twitter accounts of various e-government agencies in Nevada, this study hoped to answer three questions: how is the interactivity between the state of Nevada government agencies and the public measured, what factors influence the interactivity of social media between Nevada's e-government agencies and the public, and how can Nevada's e-government agencies make use of social media to facilitate interactivity with the public.

2015 Nevada Education Data Book (2015)

Staff of the Nevada Legislative Counsel Bureau

This report is a compilation of many data sources for state and local policymakers in Nevada. It touches on topics like school finance, teachers and leaders, statewide student testing, education programs designed to improve student achievement, special education, charter schools, and many others. It often includes comparison data points for states in the Western US.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Case Studies: Clark County School District (2012)

State Education Technology Directors Association

This case study is a look into Clark County School District - Nevada's largest school district and its relationship with the Pathway Project. The Pathway Project improves middle school achievement by engaging students in 21st century learning experiences through the use of iPod Touches and laptop carts. The program is also paired with professional development for teachers and many resources.

Profiles in Innovation: How the Enhancing Education Through Technology Program is Improving Teaching and Learning in America's Schools (2011)

The Bernstein Strategy Group

This group of case studies from around the US looks at the status and successes of programs from the federal Enhancing Education Through Technology program. This program was designed to provide students with the skills and tools they need to succeed in the 21st century. Many of the recipients of the funding are in areas that lack access to technology and broadband at home and rely on schools for interactive and engaging learning opportunities.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Applicable felonies and misdemeanors are punishable in the state of Nevada as follows:

  • Category A felony: by death or life imprisonment, with or without the possibility of parole, dependent on the statute in question.
  • Category B felony: carries a minimum prison term of one year and a maximum term of 20 years in the state prison.
  • Category C felony: carries a term of imprisonment in the state prison from one to five years and the possibility of a $10,000 fine.
  • Category D felony: carries a term of imprisonment in the state prison from one to four years and the possibility of a $5,000 fine.
  • Category E felony: carries a term of imprisonment in the state prison from one to four years, which will be suspended.
  • Gross misdemeanor: punishable by up to a year’s imprisonment in the county jail and a possible fine of $2,000 which can be levied instead of, or in addition to, the prison sentence.
  • Misdemeanor: punishable by a term of imprisonment of up to six months in the county jail, a fine of $1,000, or both. In addition, community service can be imposed.

  • Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) 200.366 Sexual Assault: Definition; Penalties. Defines the offense as when a person subjects another person to sexual penetration without their consent. Where the victim is a child aged under sixteen the offense is deemed to be a category A felony; if substantial bodily injury was caused to the child the sentence will be life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. If serious bodily injury was not caused to the child, the offender must serve a minimum of 25 years in prison before parole can be considered. Where the child is under fourteen and serious bodily injury was not caused, the minimum term is 35 years’ imprisonment under a sentence of life imprisonment with the possibility of parole. If the offender has previously been convicted of a sexual offense against a child under the age of sixteen, the penalty will be life imprisonment without eligibility for parole.

  • NRS 200.368 Statutory Sexual Seduction: Penalties. This is defined as sexual contact (including intercourse, among other definitions) by a person over the age of eighteen to a person under the age of sixteen years old. A person who commits this crime is guilty of a category C felony if they are over 21 years of age and a gross misdemeanor if under 21.

  • NRS 200.571 Harassment: Definition; Penalties. This section states that it is a crime to threaten to cause bodily injury, physical damage to property or to threaten physical confinement or restraint. The person threatened must be in fear that the threat will be carried out. This is punishable as a misdemeanor as a first offense and as a gross misdemeanor for a second or subsequent offense.

  • NRS 200.575 Stalking: Definitions; Penalties. States that anyone who, without lawful authority, willfully or maliciously engages in a course of conduct that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated or harassed commits the offense of stalking. This is punishable as a misdemeanor and subsequent convictions see the crime designated as a gross misdemeanor. Where death or substantial bodily injury are threatened then the crime is that of aggravated stalking which carries a minimum sentence of two years’ and a maximum of fifteen years’ imprisonment in the state prison. They may also be fined up to $5,000. Where a person commits the crime of stalking with the use of an Internet or network site, electronic mail, text messaging or similar electronic means in a manner that substantially increases the risk of harm or violence to the victim the offense is deemed to be a category C felony.

  • NRS 200.603 Peering, Peeping or Spying Through Window, Door or Other Opening of Dwelling of Another; Penalties. States that it is a criminal offense to enter property with the intent to peer, peep or spy through an opening without consent. This is a misdemeanor unless the offender is in possession of a camera or piece of recording equipment in which case it is deemed to be a gross misdemeanor.

  • NRS 200.604 Capturing Image of Private Area of Another Person; Distributing, Disclosing, Displaying, Transmitting or Publishing Image of Private Area of Another Person; Penalties. Defined as the situation where a person knowingly and intentionally captures an image of the private area of another person without consent and where the victim had a reasonable expectation of privacy. A first offense is a gross misdemeanor and subsequent offenses are upgraded to a category E felony.

  • NRS 200.710 Unlawful to Use Minor in Producing Pornography or as Subject of Sexual Portrayal in Performance. This section states that anyone who knowingly uses, encourages, entices or permits a minor to engage in, or be the subject of, sexual conduct for a performance is guilty of a category A felony. Where the child is under fourteen the sentence is life imprisonment with the possibility of parole after ten years and a fine of up to $100,000. If the victim is of or over the age of fourteen, the sentence is also life imprisonment but the minimum term before parole is five years, with a fine of up to $100,000.

  • NRS 200.720 Promotion of Sexual Performance of Minor Unlawful. States that it is a crime where the simulated sexual conduct by a minor or is promoted as a performance. This includes where the minor is the subject of the sexual portrayal and is a category A felony. Where the child is under fourteen the sentence is between ten years’ and life imprisonment. Where they are over fourteen the minimum term is five years’ imprisonment.

  • NRS 200.725 Preparing, Advertising or Distributing Materials Depicting Pornography Involving Minor Unlawful; Penalty. States that a person who knowingly prepares, advertises or distributes any item or material that depicts a minor engaging in sexual conduct is guilty of a category B felony. The term of imprisonment ranges from one year to fifteen years, a fine of up to $15,000 or both the prison term and the fine.

  • NRS 200.727 Use of Internet to Control Visual Presentation Depicting Sexual Conduct of Person Under 16 Years of Age; Penalties. This section states that anyone who uses the Internet with the specific intent to view any film, photograph or other visual presentation depicting a person under the age of sixteen years engaging in or simulating sexual conduct, is guilty of a category C felony offense. Any subsequent offense is classed as a category B felony, punishable by imprisonment for a term of between one and six years, and may be fined a maximum of $5,000.

  • NRS 200.730 Possession of Visual Presentation Depicting Sexual Conduct of Person Under 16 Years of Age Unlawful; Penalties. It is a criminal offense to knowingly possess a photograph, film, or other visual presentation depicting a person under the age of sixteen as the subject of a sexual portrayal or engaging in or simulating sexual conduct. For a first offense, the offender is guilty of a category B felony and may be sentenced to between one and six years’ imprisonment, fined up to $5,000 or imprisoned and fined. For subsequent offenses the sentences range from one year’s to life imprisonment with the possibility of parole, in accordance with a category A felony. A fine of up to $5,000 may also be levied.

  • NRS 200.737 Use of Electronic Communication Device by Minor to Possess, Transmit or Distribute Sexual Images of Minor; Penalties. This section states that it is an offense for any minor to willfully and knowingly use an electronic communication device to transmit or distribute a sexual image of himself/herself to another person. A first violation means that the minor is a child in need of supervision, but does not make him/her a delinquent; a second or subsequent offense is deemed to be a delinquent act, meaning the court may order the detention of the minor. The section also states that it is an offense to use electronic communication to transmit a sexual image depicting another minor who is older than, the same age or no more than four years younger than the offender. This is deemed to be a delinquent act, rendering the offending minor liable to detention. The possession of an image as described above is also an offense, leading to the need for supervision for a first offense and termed a delinquent act for any subsequent offenses. None of the acts above make the offending minor a registered sex offender or juvenile sex offender.

  • NRS 201.195 Solicitation of Minor to Engage in Acts Constituting Crimes Against Nature; Penalties. Defines the offense of enticing, soliciting or inciting a minor to engage in acts constituting crimes against nature (i.e. anal intercourse, cunnilingus or fellatio between persons of the same sex). Where the minor did engage in such acts and is under the age of fourteen, this is classed as a category A felony, punishable by life imprisonment with possibility for parole after a minimum term of ten years. Where the minor is aged fourteen or above, the offense is also a category A felony but with eligibility for parole after five years. If the minor did not engage in such acts, the offense is a gross misdemeanor for a first offense and a category A felony for any subsequent offenses, with a minimum prison term of five years.

  • NRS 201.210 Open or Gross Lewdness; Penalty. States that anyone who commits any act of open or gross lewdness is guilty for the first offense of a gross misdemeanor and subsequently of a category D felony, not including breastfeeding.

  • NRS 201.220 Indecent or Obscene Exposure; Penalty. Defines the offense where a person makes any open and indecent or obscene exposure of his person, deemed to be a gross misdemeanor for a first offense. Second or subsequent offenses are upgraded to a category D felony.

  • NRS 201.230 Lewdness With Child Under 16 Years; Penalties. It is a crime to commit any lewd or lascivious act upon the body of a child under the age of sixteen with the intent of arousing or gratifying the sexual desires of either party. This is punishable as a category A felony which carries a maximum sentence of life imprisonment with eligibility for parole beginning only when a minimum of 10 years has been served. In addition, a fine of up to $10,000 may be imposed. A second conviction under this section, or a previous conviction relating to a similar offense in another state, leads to the imposition of a sentence of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

  • NRS 201.249 Production, Sale, Distribution, Exhibition and Possession of Obscene Items or Materials; Penalty. States that it is an offense to print, produce, publish, sell or possess with intent to sell any obscene item or material. This is deemed to be a misdemeanor.

  • NRS 201.253 Obscene, Indecent or Immoral Shows, Acts or Performances; Penalty. This section states that every person who knowingly engages in the performance or exhibition of, any obscene, indecent or immoral show, act or performance is guilty of a misdemeanor.

  • NRS 201.265 Unlawful Acts; Penalty. States, among other things, that it is unlawful to distribute harmful material to a minor, including exhibiting or selling to them. The offense is deemed to be a misdemeanor.

  • NRS 201.352 Additional Fine for Pandering Child and Conspiring to Pander Child. States that anyone convicted of pandering (NRS 201.300), living from earnings or prostitute (NRS 201.320), or furnishing transportation for the purpose of pandering (NRS 201.340), and the victim is a minor under the age of fourteen, the court may impose a fine of up to $500,000 in addition to any penalty prescribed for the offense. Where the victim is aged between fourteen and seventeen, a fine of up to $100,000 may be added to the penalty.

  • NRS 201.560 Luring Children or Person with Mental Illness; Definitions; Exceptions; Penalties. States, among other things, that it is an offense to knowingly contact or communicate with a child who is less than sixteen years of age (and who is at least five years younger than the offender) with the intent to persuade, lure or transport the child away from his home. Where the intent is to engage in sexual conduct with the child the sentence is between one and ten years’ imprisonment, a fine of $10,000 and is deemed to be a category B felony. Where contact is made through a computer network the sentence ranges from two to fifteen years’ imprisonment, with a possible fine of up to $10,000. If they are guilty of providing the child with material that is harmful to them, the offender may be sentenced to between one and six years’ imprisonment and fined $10,000.

  • NRS 236.073 Week of Respect. Requires the Governor to annually proclaim the first week in October to be the ‘Week of Respect’. The proclamation shall bring the residents’ attention to information, preventative methods regarding cyberbullying (among other issues), as well as appropriate support for victims. Furthermore, school districts are required to provide age-appropriate instruction on ways in which students can prevent cyberbullying.

  • NRS 388.123 “Cyber-bullying” defined. “Cyber-bullying” means bullying through the use of electronic communication. The term includes the use of electronic communication to transmit or distribute a sexual image of a minor. As used in this section, “sexual image” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 200.737.

  • NRS 388.1325 Bullying Prevention Fund: Creation; Acceptance of Gifts and Grants; Credit of Interest and Income; Authorized Uses by School District that Receives Grant. Creates the Bullying Prevention Fund, which school districts can apply for to use for the establishment of cyberbullying prevention programs, the provision of training and the development of policies and procedures related to bullying and cyberbullying.

  • NRS 388.1341 Development of Informational Pamphlet by Department; Annual Review and Update; Posting on Internet Website; Development of Tutorial. Requires the Department of Education (DoE) to develop an informational pamphlet for students and parents addressing bullying, cyberbullying, harassment and intimidation, if money is available. If developed, the pamphlet must include descriptions of methods used to identify and assist pupils at risk for cyberbullying. The DoE shall, if money is available, develop an online tutorial, addressing the issue on their website.

  • NRS 388.1342 Establishment of Program of Training by Department; Completion of Program by Members of State Board of Education; Authorized Participation by Boards of Trustees; Annual Review and Update. Requires the DoE to establish a training program on methods to identify, prevent and report incidents of cyberbullying for members of the State Board, which the members have to complete within one year of being appointed. The DoE shall also recommend a similar program for members of the Board of Trustees of school districts.

  • NRS 388.1343 School Safety Team; Establishment by Principal of Each School; Duties of Principal. This section states that the principal of each school district shall establish a school safety team to develop a school environment free from cyberbullying, conduct investigations of violations, and collaborate with the board of trustees of the school district and the school safety team to prevent, identify and address reported violations at the school.

  • NRS 388.1344 School Safety Team; Membership, Chair, Duties. States, among other things, that each school safety team must meet at least twice annually, identity patterns of cyberbullying at school, review and strengthen the policies addressing the above, and inform staff, pupils and parents on these.

  • NRS 388.135 Bullying and cyberbullying prohibited. This section states that it is illegal for any student or school employee to engage in cyberbullying, harassment, intimidation or bullying on school premises.

  • NRS 388.139 Text of Certain Provisions Required to be Included in Rules of Behavior. Requires each school district to include a cyberbullying, bullying and harassment policy within each copy of the rules of behavior for pupils.

  • NRS 392.915 Threatening to Cause Bodily Harm or Death to Pupil or School Employee by Means of Oral, Written or Electronic Communication; Penalties. States that anyone who, through the use of written, oral or electronic communication, including through cyberbullying, threatens to cause bodily harm or death to a pupil or school employee with intent to harass, alarm or frighten the pupil or employee, cause panic or interfere with the operation of the school, is guilty of a misdemeanor. Where the threat succeeds to cause actual alarm, distress, intimidation or harassment, panic or disturbance, it is deemed to be a gross misdemeanor.