Nebraska

Population

1,920,076

Population 0‑18

24.8%

Internet Users

75.9%

Home Internet Subscribers

76.1%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

The Department of Education created the Network, Education, and Technology (NEaT) Team which provides leadership and support for technology integration and innovation in Nebraska schools in order to provide quality education and equal opportunity for Nebraska learners. The NEaT Team provides grants for model educational technology projects to Nebraska schools and educational service units. Grant awards are given to schools or educational service units for projects which have the greatest potential to enhance the quality of instruction in Nebraska schools or to broaden the educational opportunities for Nebraska learners.

In 2015, the Nebraska Department of Education and Apple announced a partnership called NeBooks, which recognizes the gaps in traditional textbooks and provides educators with additional teaching resources. NeBooks allows elementary and middle school students, educators, and partner agencies to easily create iBooks using apps like iBooks Author and Book Creator. It originally was created to provide curriculum for the 4th grade Nebraska State History subject but has since grown to all content areas.

In 2016, a new professional development project was announced by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the Nebraska Department of Education. A $1 million grant was awarded by the Nebraska Mathematics & Science Partnership Grant, which operates under Title IIB of NCLB, to UNL in order to provide K12 teachers in high need districts professional development for math and science instruction. Nebraska Partnership TEAMS (Teaching to Enhance Achievement in Math and Science) was created in six cities and saw over fifty teachers lead courses to 175 teacher participants. Participants in the Summer 2017 and School Year 2017-2018 session earned 3 graduate level course credits and a small salary.

In the 2016-2017 school year, the Nebraska Department of Education provided funding for 121 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC), which benefited 20,669 students in 32 different communities. 21st CCLCs establish and support quality extended learning opportunities for when kids aren’t in school, such as before and after school and school breaks. Grant money comes from Title IV, Section B of NCLB. Approximately 65% of students attended the programs 30 days or more.

Nebraska Department of Education

The Department of Education provides services such as best practices for teachers, distance learning assistance and research results. They operate an Educational Technology program which promotes the use of current and emerging technologies in the classroom.

Nebraska Distance Learning Association (NDLA)

The NDLA is a professional development organization that builds awareness and provides networking opportunities and resources for connected learning environments. Members and board members come from K-12 and higher education teachers, state and local government, Telehealth fields, corporate environment, and other various distance and blended learning professions.

Nebraska Educational Technology Association (NETA)

NETA is a grassroots organization that provides leadership and promotes the application of technology to the educational process. Its focus includes all levels and aspects of education. Their Board and leadership team consists of people involved in both educational and technology-related fields.

Nebraska Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC)

The Nebraska ICAC offers resources on how to keep kids safe online. It features cooperation between several law enforcement agencies, the Internet industry, schools, corporations and more in order to tackle internet crimes and child sexual exploitation.

Project Harmony

Project Harmony exists to provide effective, immediate and sensitive support to child abuse victims and their non-offending family members. Medical evaluations, forensic interviews and advocacy services are provided to ensure that each child and family gets the most from those responding to child abuse.

Protect the Good Life

Protect the Good Life is an initiative from the Consumer Protection Division of the Attorney General’s Office. They protect Nebraskans from fraud, scams, and ensure fair competitions between businesses. This is done through consumer education, mediation of consumer complaints, and enforcement. Protect the Good Life also provides information on Internet safety and other tips.

SafeKids Nebraska

SafeKids Nebraska is part of the greater SafeKids network and their main focus is to help protect children from unintentional injury. Their website offers training and programs to teach parents how to keep their kids safe.

Technology Association of Nebraska

The Technology Association of Nebraska (TAN) is a statewide organization dedicated to strengthen Nebraska’s technology ecosystem. This cultivation of industry leaders are committed to strengthening Nebraska’s reputation as a tech-sound state to grow world-class companies, retain top high-tech talent and pioneer technology expansions into the state’s 21st century. The Association focuses on Visibility:Measure the impact of technology jobs in Nebraska, Educating: Partnerships and platforms for technical educational advancements, Development & Recruitment: Developing talent for the state, Policy: Educate political leaders to ensure sustainability

Nebraska High School Students' Computer Skills and Attitudes (2018)

Lynne E. Houtz, Uma G. Gupta

There is an assumption that differences exist between genders and racial groups in their attitudes towards computer technology. This research study surveyed Nebraska high schoolers about their attitudes, use and career interest in technology.

2014 Nebraska Department of Education Technology Report (2014)

Nebraska Department of Education

This report compiles the 2013-2014 data from the Nebraska Department of Education's Technology Planning tool. This report includes statistics on students per instructional devices, one to one and bring your own device plans, instructional technology growth and more.

2013 State of K-12 Technology Report (2013)

Nebraska State Board of Education

This report compiles and distributes the information gathered from the Technology Planning tool from the Nebraska Department of Education. This tool helps educators think about how technology can improve student learning and the 2013 report is the first of an annual report.

Virtual Education Benefits All of Nebraska (2010)

Anne Duda

This article reports on the importance of utilizing technology in schools to their full potential. It notes how virtual education courses can level the playing field for urban and rural Nebraska students.

I-SAFE Evaluation (2006)

Susan Chibnall, Madeleine Wallace, Christin Leicht, Lisa Lunghofer

In 2001, Caliber Associates was awarded a contract to carry out an experimental longitudinal study of the effectiveness of the i-SAFE curriculum which teaches students about Internet safety. Sites in Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Nebraska were chosen to conduct surveys which asked children about whether they retained the information given in the course and do they use the knowledge they gained. They also tried to determine at what reduced levels or intensities of implementation are the curriculum benefits no longer measurable.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Nebraska imposes the following punishments for felony crimes:

Class I felony: Death sentence.

Class IA felony: Life imprisonment without parole.

Class IB felony: Minimum sentence of 20 years’ imprisonment up to a maximum term of life imprisonment.

Class IC felony: Minimum sentence of five years’ imprisonment up to a maximum term of 50 years’ imprisonment.

Class ID felony: Minimum sentence of three years’ imprisonment up to a maximum term of 50 years’ imprisonment.

Class II felony: Minimum sentence of one year’s imprisonment up to a maximum term of 50 years’ imprisonment.

Class III felony: Minimum sentence of one year’s imprisonment up to a maximum term of 20 years’ imprisonment, or a $25,000 fine, or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Class IIIA felony: No minimum sentence but a maximum sentence of five years’ imprisonment, or a $10,000 fine, or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Class IV felony: No minimum sentence but a maximum sentence of five years’ imprisonment, or a $10,000 fine, or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Sentences of less than a year are usually served in the county jail whereas those over one year are served in the state prison.

The penalty for misdemeanor crimes is as follows:

Class I misdemeanor: No minimum sentence but a maximum sentence of one year’s imprisonment, a $1,000 fine or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Class II misdemeanor: No minimum sentence but a maximum sentence of six months’ imprisonment, a $1,000 fine or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Class III misdemeanor: No minimum sentence but a maximum sentence of three months’ imprisonment, a $1,000 fine or both the prison sentence and a fine.

Class IIIA misdemeanor: A maximum sentence of seven days’ imprisonment, a $500 fine or both the prison sentence and the fine.

Class IV misdemeanor: $500 fine only, no prison sentence.

Nebraska Revised Statutes (NRS) 28-311. Criminal child enticement; attempt; penalties. It is a criminal offense for any person to solicit, coax or entice any child under fourteen into any vehicle. This is a Class IIIA felony unless the offender has previously been convicted for a qualifying crime, such as sexual assault of a child in the first degree, in which case it is a Class III offense.

NRS 28-311.03. Stalking. Defines the offense as willfully harassing another person with intent to injure, terrify, threaten or intimidate. The offense is deemed to be a Class I misdemeanor unless the victim is under sixteen, in which case it becomes a Class IV felony.

NRS 28-311.08. Unlawful intrusion; penalty. It is a crime to intentionally view or record in a state of undress, a person in a place of solitude without their consent. This is a Class III misdemeanor unless the person is under eighteen in which case it is a Class II misdemeanor.

NRS 28-319. Sexual assault; first degree; penalty. Defines the offense of subjecting another to sexual penetration without their consent or where the offender is nineteen years of age or older and the victim is at least twelve but less than sixteen years of age. This is deemed to be a Class II felony and if found guilty for a second time under this section a 25 year minimum prison term applies.

NRS 28-319.01. Sexual assault of a child; first degree; penalty. It is an offense to subject another person under twelve years of age to sexual penetration where the offender is at least nineteen years of age or to subject a child of at least twelve years of age but less than sixteen years of age to sexual penetration where the offender is 25 years of age or older. This is a Class IB felony with a mandatory minimum of fifteen years’ imprisonment for a first offense. If the offender has previously been convicted of a qualifying offense the mandatory minimum prison term is increased to 25 years.

NRS 28-320. Sexual assault; second or third degree; penalty. Where a person is subjected to sexual contact without their consent or where they are unable to consent the offender is guilty of a Class III felony where serious personal injury is caused and a Class I misdemeanor where there is no serious personal injury.

NRS 28-320.01. Sexual assault of a child; second or third degree; penalties. A person commits sexual assault of a child in the second or third degree if they subject another person who is fourteen years of age or younger to sexual contact and they are at least nineteen. It is a Class II felony where serious personal injury results and a Class IIIA felony where there is no serious personal injury. If the perpetrator has previously been convicted under this or another qualifying section the offense is deemed to be a Class IC felony and a minimum term of imprisonment of 25 years applies.

NRS 28-320.02. Sexual assault; use of electronic communication device; prohibited acts; penalties. It is a crime to knowingly solicit, coax, entice, or lure a child of under sixteen by way of electronic communication to commit a list of prohibited acts. This is deemed to be a Class ID felony for a first offense and a Class IC felony for subsequent offenses.

NRS 28-322.05. Unlawful use of the Internet by a prohibited sex offender; penalties. Any person required to register under the Sex Offender Registration Act and who knowingly and intentionally uses a social networking web site, instant messaging, or chat room service that allows a person who is less than eighteen years of age to access or use it commits the offense of unlawful use of the Internet by a prohibited sex offender. This is punishable as a Class I misdemeanor for a first offense and a Class IIIA felony subsequently.

NRS 28-805. Debauching a minor; penalty. Any person commits this offense when they debauch or deprave the morals of any boy or girl under the age of seventeen years by lewdly inducing them carnally to know any other person or arranging, aiding or assisting in any meeting between the child and any other person for the purpose of sexual penetration. The crime is deemed to be a Class I misdemeanor.

NRS 28-806. Public indecency; penalty. It is an offense for any person over the age of eighteen to perform or procure any act of sexual penetration, exposure of genitals or any lewd fondling in a public place. This is deemed to be a Class II misdemeanor.

NRS 28-808. Obscene literature and material; sale to minor, unlawful; penalty. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly sell, deliver, distribute, display for sale, or provide to a minor any picture or image of either male or female genitals which are predominantly prurient. The crime is deemed to be a Class I misdemeanor.

NRS 28-809. Obscene motion picture, show, or presentation; admit minor; unlawful; penalty. It is an offense to admit a minor to a premises where there is a motion picture showing that would be harmful to minors. This is a Class I misdemeanor.

NRS 28-813. Obscene literature or material; prepares; distributes; promotes; penalty. It is a criminal offense to print, copy or manufacture any obscene material or performance. It is also unlawful to promote such literature. The crime is deemed to be a Class I misdemeanor.

NRS 28-813.01. Sexually explicit conduct; visual depiction; unlawful; penalty. It is unlawful to possess any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct which includes a child . If the offender is under nineteen years of age the offense is deemed to be a Class IV felony. If the offender is over nineteen years of age the offense is deemed to be a Class III felony.