Missouri

Population

6,113,532

Population 0‑18

22.8%

Internet Users

74.6%

Home Internet Subscribers

74.5%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2006 - Megan Meier, a thirteen-year-old from Saint Charles, Missouri, committed suicide after being bullied online by a profile claiming to be a local boy from a different school. The profile was later found to belong to a friend of Megan’s and the friend’s mother. The friend’s mother was indicated for violating the Internet Fraud and Abuse Act in 2008 but was later acquitted in 2009. Her suicide prompted many conversations and legislative action concerning cyberbullying and harassment in the state of Missouri.

2007 - The Missouri Virtual instruction Program (MoVIP) was established. This program offers Missouri students online classes in grades K-12. It offers classes to public, private, and home schooled students. MoVIP will help students who want to take advanced courses or foreign language course that are not offered in schools, but this will also help students who are not able to attend school such as medical reasons. With this program there are about 250 different courses that will allow students to take foreign language and Advanced Placement courses online.

2008 - The Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act requires each school to certify that their internet safety policy involves education on appropriate behavior online and cyberbullying awareness.

2017 - Governor Eric Greitens has announced his initiative to bring high-quality, broadband Internet access to every school in Missouri. He has worked with his administration and other state and federal partners to raise $45 million in funds to help public schools build the infrastructure necessary for quality internet access.

Gateway Media Literacy Partners, Inc.

This St. Louis organization focuses on media literacy advocacy through the use of speakers, workshops, resources, and blogs.

INOBTR

INOBTR (“I Know Better”) is a nonprofit that works to protect families and keep them safe online through proactive education and by raising public awareness of online risks. It began as a public awareness initiative to stop the sexual exploitation of children online.

Media Literacy NOW - Missouri Chapter

This organization is the leading national advocacy organization for media literacy. It provides parents and teachers with the necessary resources to help improve media literacy. While a Massachusetts organization, Missouri has its own chapter.

Missouri Cyber Security

This website is run for the Information Technology Services Division to provide Missourians with internet safety information. This mission is “to promote and provide expertise in information security management for all state agencies and support national and local homeland information security efforts.”

Missouri Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force

This task force offers Missourians information about internet crimes and prevention. It provides law enforcement officials with up-to-date information on the investigation and apprehension of online offenders.

Missouri Kids First

This organization leads and supports communities in abuse preventions. They provide parents with tools and resources to help better protect their children.

Missouri Office of the Attorney General

The Missouri Attorney General’s website contains an Internet Safety pages, which features tips for students of all ages, parents, and educators on how to avoid dangerous situations on the internet and how adults can teach children how to safely use the web.

MOREnet

MOREnet works to provide internet connectivity and technical services to people in the state of Missouri. Their website features information about online safety for kids and parental control units for adults. It operates under the University of Missouri and is also connected with the Missouri PTA.

State Cyber Crime Grant Program

This program is run by the Missouri Department of Public Safety. The funds are appropriated by the state legislature and are awarded to efforts to reduce internet crimes against children and for public safety improvement.

Important, But Not for Me: Parents and Students in Kansas and Missouri Talk About Math, Science and Technology Education (2007)

Alison Kadlec, Will Friedman, Amber Ott

This study focuses on improving math, science, and technology education in the Kansas City metro region, so it asks parents and students in Kansas and Missouri to consider their opinions and attitudes on the subject. It included both surveying methods and focus groups and interviews.

Student Expectations of Information Technology Use in the Classroom (2000)

Jon Rickman, Mike Grudzinski

This study releases data from a survey of faculty and students at Northwest Missouri State University, asking their opinions on information technology use in the college classroom.

The Effects of Internet-Based Instruction on Student Learning (1999)

Scott B. Wegner, Ken C. Holloway, Edwin M. Garton

This study looks at the practice of using technology to deliver coursework in higher education and the utilization of distance learning. This study specifically looks at two semesters worth of data to see the effects of distance learning and student achievement and attitude.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Missouri Revised Statutes (RSMo) §160.261.14. Discipline, Written Policy Established by Local Boards of Education – Contents – Reporting Requirements – Additional Restrictions for Certain Suspensions – Weapons Offense, Mandatory Suspension or Expulsion – No Civil Liability for Authorized Personnel – Spanking not Child Abuse, When – Investigation Procedure – Officials Falsifying Reports, Penalty. States, among other things, that schools are legally obliged to report to law enforcement when certain crimes are (or may have been) committed on school property, including on school transport. Included in the list are various sex crimes, harassment and stalking.

RSMo §565.090. Harassment. Defines the offense as where a person communicates a threat to another person that they are going to commit a felony and in doing so they frighten, intimidate, or cause emotional distress to that person. This offense is a Class E felony.

RSMo §565.225. Stalking, first degree. This section states that a person commits the crime of stalking if they purposely harass or follow another person with the intent of harassing that person. This offense is deemed a Class E felony, unless it is a second or repeat offense, in which case stalking in the first degree is a Class D felony.

RSMo §565.252. Invasion of Privacy, First Degree, Penalty. Defines the crime as knowingly photographing or filming another person without their knowledge and consent, in a state of full or partial nudity. The statute specifies that the filming or photography must have taken place in a location where the victim has a reasonable expectation of privacy and that the offender subsequently distributes, transmits via computer or otherwise disseminates the image or recording to another. The offense is deemed to be a Class E felony.

RSMo §565.253. Crime of Invasion of Privacy, Second Degree, Penalties. Defines the crime as knowingly photographing or filming another person without their knowledge and consent, in a state of full or partial nudity. The statute specifies that the filming or photography must have taken place in a location where the victim has a reasonable expectation of privacy and that the offender uses a concealed camera or camera of any type to secretly photograph, record by electronic means or videotape the victim through or under their clothing, for the purposes of viewing the victim’s body or undergarments. The offense is deemed to be a Class A misdemeanor unless more than one person is recorded, in which case the offense is upgraded to a Class D felony. The Class D felony classification also applies if the offender has previously been convicted of the same offense but can be upgraded to a Class C felony if some criteria apply.

RSMo §566.030. Forcible Rape and Attempted Forcible Rape, Penalties. States that anyone who has sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion is guilty of an offense. Forcible compulsion includes, but is not limited to, where the child is less than twelve years old. The sentence for this carries a minimum of five years and maximum of life imprisonment, unless the victim is less than twelve years of age or the perpetrator is a predatory sex offender or the offense is an aggravated sexual offense, in which case the sentencing may be different. RSMO 566.031 Rape in the Second Degree. States that a person is guilty of this offense if he or she has sexual intercourse with another person knowing that he or she does so without that person’s consent. This offense is a Class D felony.

RSMo §566.032. Statutory Rape and Attempt to Commit, First Degree, Penalties. This section states that it is an offense to engage in sexual intercourse with a child under the age of fourteen. The maximum sentence for this is life imprisonment with a minimum term of five years. The minimum will increase to ten years’ imprisonment if the offender caused serious physical injury, threatened the victim with a deadly weapon, committed the offense jointly with one or more persons, or where the victim is under the age of twelve.

RSMo §566.034. Statutory Rape, Second Degree, Penalty. Defines as a crime the situation where a person of or over the age of 21 engages in sexual intercourse with a minor under the age of seventeen. This is a Class D felony.

RSMo §566.060. Forcible Sodomy, Penalties – Suspended Sentence not Granted. States that anyone who has deviate sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion is guilty of a crime. The maximum sentence for this is life imprisonment with a minimum term of five years. Where the victim is under twelve years old, the offender will not be eligible for parole until at least 30 years of the sentence have been served. The section also states that where the victim was under the age of twelve and the forcible sodomy was outrageously inhumane or horrible, e.g. it involved torture or depravity of mind, the offender will not be eligible for parole at any point.

RSMo §566.062. Statutory Sodomy and Attempt to Commit, First Degree, Penalties. This section defines the crime where a person has deviate sexual intercourse with a child aged under fourteen. The maximum sentence for this is life imprisonment, with a minimum sentence of five years’ imprisonment. The minimum will increase to ten years’ imprisonment if the offender caused serious physical injury, threatened the victim with a deadly weapon, committed the offense jointly with one or more persons, or where the victim is under the age of twelve.

RSMo §566.064. Statutory Sodomy, Second Degree, Penalty. States that a person commits this crime if, being 21 years old or more, he has deviate sexual intercourse with another person who is less than seventeen years of age. This is deemed to be a Class D felony.

RSMo §566.067. Child Molestation, First Degree, Penalties. States that it is an offense to submit another person who is less than fourteen years of age to sexual contact. It is punishable as a Class A felony, and if the victim is a child less than twelve years old, the person shall serve his or her term of imprisonment without eligibility for probation, parole, or conditional release.

RSMo §566.068. Child Molestation, Second Degree, Penalties. States that it is a crime to submit a minor who is less than twelve years of age to sexual contact or is more than four years older than a child who is less than seventeen years of age, subjects the child to sexual contact and the offense is an aggravated sexual offense. This is a Class B felony.

RSMo §566.083. Sexual Misconduct Involving a Child, Penalty. This section states that anyone who intentionally exposes their genitals to a child under fifteen with the intention either to cause affront or to gratify their sexual desire is guilty of a Class E felony, and a Class D felony for a second offense.

RSMo §566.093. Sexual Misconduct, Second Degree, Penalties. States that it is a crime for a person to expose their genitals in the knowledge that it will cause affront or where they engage in sexual intercourse in a public place. This is defined as a Class B misdemeanor, unless it is a second or repeat offense, in which case it is a Class A misdemeanor.

RSMo §566.095. Sexual Misconduct, Third Degree, Penalty. States that a person commits this offense where they solicit or request another person to engage in sexual conduct knowing that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. This is deemed to be a Class C misdemeanor.

RSMO 566.101 Sexual abuse, second degree. States that a person is guilty of this offense if he or she purposely subjects another person to sexual contact without that person’s consent. The offense is a Class A misdemeanor, unless it is an aggravated sexual offense, in which case it is a Class E felony.

RSMo §566.103. Crime of Promoting Online Sexual Solicitation, Violation, Penalty. This section states that any person or company who knowingly permits their web-based classified service to be used by individuals to post advertisements promoting prostitution, enticing a child to engage in sexual conduct, or promoting sexual trafficking of a child, is guilty of an offense. This is a felony and is punishable by a fine of $5,000 for each day that the advertisement remains up after notice has been given.

RSMo §566.151. Enticement of a Child, Penalties. Sets a penalty of between five to 30 years’ imprisonment for any person over the age of 21 who persuades, solicits or entices (among other definitions) via the Internet or electronic communication any child under the age of fifteen to engage in sexual conduct.

RSMO 566.210.1 Sexual Trafficking of a Child, First Degree. States that a person is guilty of this offense if he or she knowingly entices or harbors a person under the age of twelve to participate in a commercial sex act or benefits from participation in these activities. This offense is a felony for which the authorized term of imprisonment is life imprisonment without eligibility for parole until the offender has served not less than twenty-five years of such sentence.

RSMO 566.211.1 Sexual Trafficking of a Child, Second Degree. States that a person is guilty of this offense if he or she knowingly entices or harbors a person under the age of eighteen to participate in a commercial sex act or benefits from participation in these activities. This offense is a felony punishable by imprisonment for a term of years not less than ten or life, and a fine not to exceed two hundred fifty thousand dollars if the child is under the age of eighteen. RSMo §567.050. Promoting Prostitution in the First Degree. This section states that anyone who promotes the prostitution of a minor under the age of sixteen is guilty of a Class B felony.

RSMo §568.060. Abuse of a Child, Penalty. Defines the offense as (among other criteria) photographing or recording a child under the age of eighteen years old engaging in a prohibited sexual act, simulated sexual act or causing or knowingly permitting a child to engage in such acts for the purpose of photographing or recording them. The offense is deemed to be a Class C felony but particularly serious crimes can carry the Class B, or even Class A if the child dies, felony classification.

RSMo §568.110. Professional’s Duty to Report on Film, Photographs, Videotapes, Failure to Report, Penalty – Exceptions. Requires a computer provider, installer or repair person, or any Internet service provider who has knowledge of or observes, within their employment any image of a child under eighteen engaged in sexual conduct, to report that image to a law enforcement agency. Failure to do so is classified as a Class B misdemeanor.

RSMo §573.020. Promoting Obscenity in the First Degree. States that it is a crime to wholesale promote material considered to be obscene; this includes possession with intent to promote. The offense in the first degree is deemed to be a Class E felony. This includes promotion of pornographic material for minors via Internet, computer or computer network.

RSMo §573.023. Sexual Exploitation of a Minor. This section states that a person is guilty of this offense if they knowingly or recklessly photograph, film or otherwise record a child engaging in obscene behavior or child pornography. This is punishable as a Class B felony, unless the minor is a child (under the age of fourteen), in which case it is a Class A felony offense.

RSMo §573.025. Promoting Child Pornography in the First Degree. Decrees that it is a criminal offense to possess with the intent to promote or to promote child pornography of a child less than fourteen years of age. This is a Class B felony unless the person knowingly promotes it to a minor in which case it is elevated to a Class A felony and carries a minimum prison term of three years.

RSMo §573.030. Promoting Obscenity in the Second Degree. This section states that anyone who, among other things, makes obscene material available to a minor via the Internet, a computer network or electronic transfer is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor, unless the offender has previously been convicted of an offense under this section, in which case the offense is deemed to be a Class D felony.

RSMo §573.035. Promoting Child Pornography in the Second Degree. This covers possession of child pornography with intent to promote. This is a Class D felony unless the person knowingly promotes the material to a minor in which case it is a Class B felony.

RSMo §573.037. Possession of Child Pornography. It is defined as a crime where a person knowingly or recklessly possesses any child pornography of a minor under the age of eighteen or obscene material portraying what appears to be a minor under the age of eighteen. This is a Class D felony, unless the person possesses more than 20 images or one motion picture in which case it is deemed to be a Class B felony.

RSMo §573.040. Furnishing Pornographic Materials to Minors. This section defines the crime of a person intentionally or recklessly furnishing any pornographic material to minors. This is a Class A misdemeanor.

RSMo §573.060. Public Display of Explicit Sexual Material. States that a person is guilty of this offense where they knowingly or recklessly display explicit sexual material publicly. This is defined as a Class A misdemeanor unless the offender is a recidivist, in which case it is a Class D felony.

RSMo 573.200. Child Used in Sexual Performances. States that a person is guilty of this offense if the person employs, authorizes, or induces a child less than eighteen years of age to engage in a performance which includes sexual conduct or is the guardian of such child and consents to the participation. The offense is a Class C felony, but is Class B if the person inflicts serious emotional injury on the child.

RSMo 573.205. Promoting Sexual Performance by a Child. States that a person is guilty of this offense if the person promotes a performance which includes sexual conduct by a child less than eighteen years of age or produces or directs such a performance. The offense is a Class C felony.