Arizona

Population

6,828,065

Population 0‑18

24.1%

Internet Users

69.5%

Home Internet Subscribers

0.0%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

Arizona has a population of nearly 7 million people, with youth (children under 18) accounting for 24.1 percent.

In Arizona, 69.5 percent of the population uses the Internet overall and 73.7 percent of residents live in a household with Internet access.

2000 – As of this year, Arizona public schools and libraries were required to establish measures to restrict minors from gaining access to harmful content online. Computers at these institutions must be equipped with filtering software restricting minors from accessing harmful material. Standards and rules were prescribed by the governing board of every school district.

2001 – The Intel Teach Program in Arizona helped educators integrate technology into academic planning. It pledged to aid students and teachers in reaching their full potentials while supporting long-term economic growth by fostering more effective use of technology and committing to mandatory ICT training for all K-12 teachers.

2009 – Arizona released its 2009-2013 Arizona Long Range Technology Plan. In this plan, the school system incorporated goals and recommendations that addressed technology infrastructure and support aimed at enhancing student achievement, leadership as well as educator preparation and development.

As part of the plan, Arizona’s Department of Education’s Technology Standards outlined technology curriculum for students by grade level. Guidelines broke down learning expectations for students in Pre-K through sixth grade, and seventh through 12th grade, focused on topics like digital citizenship, technology operations, digital interactions and information literacy.

2010 – The Arizona Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) shows teachers how they can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The plan combines five levels of technology integration – entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion and transformation – with characteristics of meaningful learning environments. TIM was funded in part by the 2010-2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Also in 2010, Intel received the National Governors Association (NGA) Public-Private Partnership Award for its continuing efforts in Arizona. Intel, nominated by Governor Brewer, enabled more than 17,500 teachers to benefit from its professional development training, making it one of the state’s key initiatives for increasing the use of educational technology in the curriculum.

In addition, the e-rate application funding law went into effect. All school districts and charter schools eligible for e-rate funding as authorized by the telecommunications act of 1996 may apply for funding. School districts and charter schools that receive e-rate funding established e-rate funds to reimburse the school for broadband Internet and telecommunications costs.

2011 – Arizona implemented the Statewide Instructional Technology (SIT) project, with a focus on helping educators integrate technology into the curriculum. Rather than simply purchasing technology to effect educational change, the project aims to provide teachers with long-term support and training to enable them to integrate technology into the curriculum, thereby increasing the achievement of their students. Each of Arizona’s fifteen counties has a Technology Integration Specialist (TIS) who works directly with teachers in their classrooms, offering a wide range of guidance. The TIS are also qualified to teach iSafe as the official Internet safety curriculum in Arizona.

At the same time, the Technology Peer Coaching Program, developed by the Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology and sponsored by Microsoft, began training teacher leaders to serve as technology peer coaches for colleagues. As coaches, these teachers assist their peers in identifying ways that technology can strengthen classroom curriculum and enhance their students’ academic achievement. They also help their colleagues develop the necessary technology skills and instructional strategies needed to integrate technology into teaching and learning.

Within the same year, Arizona’s school dating abuse policies went into effect. Under this law, school district governing boards are allowed but not required to prescribe and enforce policies and procedures to address incidents of student dating abuse. This may include a definition of dating abuse, the warning signs of such abuse and characteristics of healthy relationships.

2015 – The state established an e-learning task force for the following purposes: examining e-learning programs in other states, analyzing potential ways to implement e-learning programs for Arizona, developing e-learning solutions, submitting recommendations to the board of education, collaborating with the department of administration and other entities to express technology needs, and annually reporting to the legislature. The task force consists of representatives from the business community, with backgrounds in psychometrics, with expertise in curriculum development, teachers and school administrators, a teacher trainer, higher education specialists, an online assessment expert, the superintendent of public schools, and the director of the department of administration.

Against Abuse, Inc.

Located in Pinal County, this nonprofit focuses on helping individuals and the community understand the nature and effects of family violence. It also provides resources to meet the needs of the abused.

Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence

This organization aims to increase public awareness surrounding sexual and domestic violence, enhance safety and services for survivors, and end these forms of violence in Arizona. It offers prevention programs, information on the forms sexual violence can take and legal assistance.

Arizona Department of Child Safety

With a goal of achieving safety, well-being and permanency for children, youth and families, this department offers services for reporting child abuse or neglect, and lists resources for families.

Arizona Department of Education, E-Rate

The Department of Education lists its technology plans and E-Rate master contract on this website, as well as funding application information for schools.

Arizona Department of Education, Office of School Safety and Prevention

This office provides funding, training and technical assistance to support safe learning environments. Its website displays information on bullying prevention, child abuse prevention and internet safety, among other topics.

Arizona Department of Education, School Safety Program

This program is a state-funded grant that places School Resource Officers and/or Juvenile Probation Officers in select schools to contribute to safe school environments. These officers maintain a visible presence on campus, deter delinquent and violent behaviors and provide students and staff with resources, instruction and training.

Arizona Healing House for Children

This group works on behalf of children, pre-teens and young adults who have been victims of abuse or neglect, providing them with a safe environment to learn about their pasts, self-confidence, respect and drug prevention.

Arizona Human Trafficking Council

This council works to implement best practices, develop a comprehensive and coordinated victims’ services plan, evaluate statewide data on human trafficking, and raise public awareness, among other goals. It provides information on human trafficking and educational resources on its website.

Arizona Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force

This task force is made up of investigators from federal, state, county and city agencies. They work to locate and prosecute offenders who exploit children online. The group also offers resources and information on Internet safety, and a searchable sex offender registry.

Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services (ALWAYS)

This advocacy group is composed of attorneys, advocates and volunteers, providing free legal services to support young people impacted by homelessness, human trafficking, abuse and the foster care system.

Casa de los Niños

Focused on child abuse and neglect, this organization offers prevention, intervention and health treatment programs for victims, and works to promote community awareness.

Child Crisis Arizona

This nonprofit provides educational programming and support services with the goal of preventing and ending child abuse and neglect. It advocates for children in the foster care system and provides an emergency shelter for children in crisis situations.

Children's Action Alliance

With offices in Phoenix and Tucson, this nonprofit uses research, publications, campaigns and advocacy to influence policies on the issues of health, child abuse and neglect, child care and education and juvenile justice, among others.

Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona

This nonprofit focuses on offering access to the arts to abused, neglected and homeless children, by collaborating with child welfare agencies.

Sold No More

Originally called Streetlight Tucson, this nonprofit works with local churches, organizations and individuals to combat sex trafficking in Tucson through prevention and awareness, enforcement and prosecution, and protection and restoration.

Teen Lifeline

This organization offers resources for teens, parents and educators with the aim of helping teens make healthy decisions. It focuses specifically on bullying, relationships, depression and suicide, and has a hotline.

The Office of the Attorney General of Arizona

Internet safety one of Attorney General Mark Brnovich’s areas of focus. His website lists information on cyberbullying, sexting, and resources for parents, educators, teens and children. Another area of focus is human trafficking: He formed the Underage Sex-Trafficking Coalition in 2011 to raise awareness, educate the community and advocate for stronger laws on this issue.

Training and Resources United to Stop Trafficking (TRUST)

Focused on human trafficking, this organization communicates between relevant organizations and government departments, collects research and information on the topic and facilitates training programs to raise awareness and promote best practices for support services. Its website has information on sex trafficking in Arizona.

Demanding Justice Arizona: A Field Assessment of Demand Deterrence and Enforcement and Justice for Victims (2015)

Shared Hope International

This report found that in Arizona, continued training is needed to prevent sex trafficking of minors, community awareness can be used to overcome tolerance for the crime and buyers need to be held accountable to deter crime, among other conclusions.

Report on the Incidence of Sex Trafficking in Arizona’s Juvenile Probation Departments (2015)

D. Roe-Sepowitz, K. Bracy, L. Massengale, L. Cantelme, T. Ward

The purpose of this study was to capture the rate of occurrence of sex trafficking among juveniles involved in Arizona’s juvenile justice system.

Report on the Incidence of Sex Trafficking in Maricopa County Adult Probation (2015)

D. Roe-Sepowitz, K. Bracy, J. Gallagher, M. Cimino

The purpose of this study was to provide training to adult probation officers to enhance their ability to identify and support victims of sex trafficking, as well as to explore how to best allocate victim services resources to Adult Probation staff who work with victims or offenders (traffickers) of sex trafficking situations.

National Human Trafficking Resource Center: Arizona State Report (2015)

National Human Trafficking Resource Center

This report compiles 2014 data on human trafficking, including the number of reports made to NHTRC and demographic data on the state's trafficking victims.

YES Project Youth Experiences Survey: Exploring the Sex Trafficking Experiences of Arizona’s Homeless and Runaway Young Adults (2014)

D. Roe-Sepowitz, K. Bracy, J. Cunningham, R. Beverly, C. Van Kleeck, K. Hickle, L. Cantelme

This study investigated the prevalence of sex trafficking experiences among homeless young adults ages 18-25 years old who received services from homeless programs in Arizona during July 2014.

Can Victims’ Rights Go Wrong?: Prosecuting Digital Child Pornography Crimes in Arizona (2013)

W.H. Knight

This paper argues that a balance must be struck between victims’ rights and defendants’ rights in child pornography cases to preserve fundamental values and protect communities.

School Climate Factors Contributing to Student and Faculty Perceptions of Safety in Select Arizona Schools (2011)

K. Bosworth, L. Ford, D. Hernandaz

In this study of 11 Arizona schools, in nine schools neither faculty nor students voiced overwhelming concerns about safety.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Arizona carries some of the harshest penalties in the United States for offenses against children and possibly the harshest penalties in the country for possession of child pornography. In 2006, in State v Berger, an Arizona high school teacher was sentenced to 200 years in prison for the possession of twenty images of child pornography. This was the minimum sentence allowed under state law. The reason for the longer sentence is that each image was treated as a separate charge, each incurring a mandatory ten-year sentence. The maximum sentence available to the judge was 480 years.

Arizona uses the following sentence ranges for felonies and misdemeanors:

  • Class 1 felony: maximum of life imprisonment or the death penalty
  • Class 2 felony: four to ten years’ imprisonment; aggravated twelve and a half years’ imprisonment
  • Class 3 felony: two and a half to seven years’ imprisonment; aggravated eight and three quarter years’ imprisonment
  • Class 4 felony: one and a half to three years’ imprisonment; aggravated three and three quarter years’ imprisonment
  • Class 5 felony: nine months’ to two years’ imprisonment; aggravated two and a half years’ imprisonment
  • Class 6 felony: six months’ to one and a half years’ imprisonment; aggravated two years’ imprisonment
  • Class 1 misdemeanor: up to six months’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $2,500
  • Class 2 misdemeanor: up to four months’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $750
  • Class 3 misdemeanor: up to 30 days’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $500
  • Petty offense: no jail time and a maximum fine of $300

  • Arizona Revised Statute (ARS) §8-309. Unlawful Use of an Electronic Communication Device by a Minor; Classification; Definitions. This section states that any juvenile who knowingly uses electronic communication in any form to transmit or display a visual depiction of a minor that depicts explicit sexual material is guilty of an offense. This is a petty offense if the image is send to one other person, and a Class 3 misdemeanor if transmitted to more than one person. It is also an offense to possess such an image sent to the juvenile via electronic communication, unless the juvenile did not request the image, he/she took reasonable steps to destroy or delete it, or reported it to his/her parents, guardian, school official or law enforcement officer. Possession is a petty offense. Second or subsequent offenses under this section are a Class 2 misdemeanor.
  • ARS §13-705. Dangerous Crimes Against Children; Sentences. Definitions. Defines dangerous crimes against children and lays down sentencing guidelines. Unlawful misrepresentation of age is considered to fall under this category, as is luring a minor for sexual exploitation. Offenders must serve at least 35 years in prison before they can be considered for parole, subject to certain exclusions.
  • ARS §13-1202. Threatening or Intimidating; Classification. States that it is a criminal offense to use words to threaten serious injury or to intimidate. This offense is a Class 1 misdemeanor, except it is a Class 6 felony if the offense is committed in retaliation for a victim reporting criminal activity or being involved in an organization that reports or prevents criminal activity, or if the offender is a criminal street gang member.
  • ARS §13-1307. Sex Trafficking. This section states, among other things, that it is an offense for anyone to traffic a minor under the age of 18 years with intent to engage the victim is prostitution or any sexually explicit performance. This is a Class 2 felony. Where the victim is under the age of 15, the offense is a dangerous crime against children, punishable by imprisonment between 13 and 27 years.
  • ARS §13-1402. Indecent Exposure; Exception; Classification. This section states that it is unlawful to expose one’s genitals, anus, or for a female to expose her breast in a public place where a reasonable person could be alarmed. This does not include the act of breastfeeding by a mother. An offense is a Class 1 misdemeanor unless the person exposed to is under the age of 15 in which case it is upgraded to a Class 6 felony. Anyone sentenced of committing a felony under this section who has two or more prior convictions for a violation of this section or section 13-1403 will be liable to between eight and 12 years’ imprisonment.
  • ARS §13-1403. Public Sexual Indecency; Public Sexual Indecency to a Minor; Classification. States that where a person engages in sexual intercourse, oral sexual contact, sexual contact or bestiality in the presence of another person who may be offended they commit an offense. This is a Class 1 misdemeanor unless a minor under fifteen is present, in which case it is upgraded to a Class 5 felony. Anyone sentenced of a felony under this section who has two or more prior convictions for a violation of this section or section 13-1402 will be liable to between eight and 12 years’ imprisonment.
  • ARS §13-1404. Sexual Abuse; Classification. Defines the offense of knowingly engaging in sexual contact with a minor aged fifteen or above without consent, or sexual contact involving only the female breast if the victim is aged fifteen or under. This is a Class 5 felony. Where the victim is under the age of fifteen, the offense is deemed to be a Class 3 felony and a dangerous crime against children, punishable by imprisonment between two and a half years to seven and a half years.
  • ARS §13-1405. Sexual Conduct with a Minor; Classification. States that it is a crime to engage in sexual intercourse or oral sexual contact with a person who is under 18 years of age. Where the minor is over fifteen it is a Class 6 felony and where the minor is under 15 it is a Class 2 felony. The latter is deemed to be a dangerous crime against children, punishable by imprisonment for life if the minor is aged 12 or younger. If a life sentence is not imposed, the suggested sentence is between 13 and 27 years’ imprisonment.
  • ARS §13-1406. Sexual Assault; Classification; Increased Punishment. States that where a person engages in sexual intercourse or oral sexual contact with another person without consent an offense is committed. This is deemed to be a Class 2 felony. If the victim is under the age of 15, the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children, punishable by imprisonment for life if the minor is aged 12 or younger. If the victim was unwittingly drugged by the offender, the sentence length shall be increased by three years. If a life sentence is not imposed, the suggested sentence is 13 to 27 years’ imprisonment.
  • ARS §13-1407. Defenses. States that it is a defense to a prosecution pursuant to sections 13-1405 and 13-3560 if the victim is 15, 16 or 17 years of age, the defendant is under 19 years of age or attending high school and is no more than 24 months older than the victim and the conduct is consensual. It is a defense to prosecution pursuant to sections 13-1404 and 13-1405 if the victim’s lack of consent is based on incapacity to consent because the victim was 15, 16 or 17 years old, and at the time the defendant engaged in the conduct constituting the offense the victim did not know and could not have reasonably known the age of the victim. It is a defense to a prosecution pursuant to section 13-1404 or 13-1410 that the defendant was not motivated by a sexual interest. It is a defense to a prosecution pursuant to section 13-1404 involving a victim under fifteen years of age that the defendant was not motivated by a sexual interest.
  • ARS §13-1410. Molestation of a Child; Classification. This section states that anyone who engages in or causes a child under 15 to engage in sexual contact, excluding sexual contact with the female brest, commits a Class 2 felony. This is deemed a dangerous crime against children, punishable by imprisonment for ten to 24 years.
  • ARS §13-1413. Capacity of Minor Sexual Assault Victim to Consent to Medical Examination. When it is not possible to contact the parents or legal guardian within the short time span in which the examination should be conducted a minor 12 years of age or older alleged to be the victim of a violation of sexual assault may give consent to hospital, medical and surgical examination, diagnosis and care in connection with such violation. Such consent shall not be subject to incapacity because of the victim’s age.
  • ARS §13-1417. Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Child; Classification. Defines the offense of engaging in three or more acts in violation of section 13-1405, 13-1406 or 13-1410, over the course of three or more months, with a child under 14 years of age as continuous sexual abuse of a child. This is a Class 2 felony, punishable as a dangerous crime against children, carrying a prison sentence of 13 to 27 years. If more than one victim is involved, a separate count may be charged for each victim. Recidivists will be liable to imprisonment for between 21 and 35 years.
  • ARS §13-1421. Evidence Relating to Victim’s Chastity; Pretrial Hearing. Evidence relating to a victim’s reputation for chastity and opinion evidence relating to his/her chastity are not admissible except for specific instances if the judge finds the evidence relevant and it meets one of the following criteria: (1) evidence of the victim’s past sexual conduct with the defendant; (2) evidence of specific instances of sexual activity showing the source or origin of semen, pregnancy, disease or trauma;(3) evidence that supports a claim that the victim has a motive in accusing the defendant of the crime; (4) evidence offered for the purpose of impeachment when the prosecutor puts the victim’s prior sexual conduct in issue; or (5) evidence of false allegations of sexual misconduct made by the victim against others.
  • ARS §13-1422. Adult Oriented Businesses; Location; Hours of Operation; Injunction; Classification; Definitions. An adult oriented business shall not be located within one-fourth mile of a child care facility, a private, public or charter school, a public playground, a public recreational facility, a residence or a place of worship. An adult arcade, adult bookstore, adult video store, adult cabaret, adult motion picture theater, adult theater, escort agency or nude model studio shall not remain open between 1 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Monday through Saturday and between the hours of 1 a.m. to noon on Sunday. Counties and municipalities are permitted to further regulate the location and hours of such businesses. A violation of the location or hours clauses is a Class 1 misdemeanor, with each day of violation constituting a seperate offense.
  • ARS §13-1423. Violent Sexual Assault; Natural Life Sentence. States that anyone who used or threatened to use a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or seriously injured the victim in the commission of an offense under section 13-1404, 13-1405, 13-1406 or 13-1410, having previously been convicted for a sexual offense under this chapter, is guilty of violent sexual assault. The offender will be liable to life imprisonment without the possibility of release.
  • ARS §13-1424. Voyeurism. States that it is a criminal offense to invade the privacy of another person without the knowledge of said person for the purposes of sexual gratification and stimulation. It is unlawful for a person to disclose, display, distribute or publish a photograph, videotape, film or digital recording that is made in violation of the previous clause without the consent or knowledge of the person depicted.This is a Class 5 felony, unless there is publication of the material and the person depicted is recognizable, in which case it is upgraded to a Class 4 felony.
  • ARS §13-1425. Unlawful Distribution of Images; State of Nudity; Classification; Definitions. It is an offense to intentionally disclose, display, distribute, publish, advertise or offer a photograph, videotape, film or digital recording of another person in a state of nudity or engaged in specific sexual activities if the person knows or should have known that the depicted person has not consented to the disclosure. This is a Class 5 felony, unless the person depicted is recognizable, in which case it is upgraded to a Class 4 felony.
  • ARS §13-2008. Taking Identity of Another Person or Entity; Knowingly Accepting Identity of Another Person; Classification. Defines the crime of identity theft as a Class 4 felony, punishable by up to nearly four years in prison for a first-time offender.
  • ARS §13-2316. Computer Tampering; Venue; Forfeiture; Classification. Defines computer tampering (including accessing a computer or network with the intent to defraud). Crimes under this section can be Class 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 felonies, depending on the specific offense committed.
  • ARS §13-2907.02. False Reporting of Child Abuse or Neglect; Classification. A person who knowingly and intentionally makes a false report of child abuse or neglect knowing the report is false or a person who coerces another person to make a false report of child abuse or neglect knowing the report is false is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • ARS §13-2916. Use of an Electronic Communication to Terrify, Intimidate, Threaten, Harass, Annoy or Offend; Classification; Definition. States it is an offense for any person to use an electronic or digital device and use any obscene, lewd or profane language, or threaten to physically harm the person or someone’s property with the intent to terrify, intimidate, threaten, harass, annoy or offend said person. It is also an offense to otherwise disturb a person with repeated anonymous electronic or digital communications. Such an offense is a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • ARS §13-2921. Harassment; Classification; Definition. Defines harassment as anonymously or otherwise contacting, communicating or causing communication with another person by verbal or electronic means with intent to harass that person. It also includes following another person in or about a public place for no legitimate purpose after being asked to desist, repeatedly committing harassment, or surveilling or causing another person to surveil someone for no legitimate purpose. This is a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • ARS §13-2921.01. Aggravated Harassment; Classification; Definition. A person has committed this offense when a person commits harassment and: (1) a court has issued an order of protection or an injunction against harassment against the person and in favor of the victim of harassment and the order or injunction has been served and is still valid; or (2) the person has previously been convicted of a domestic violence offense. The victim of the previous offense must be the same as in the present offense for this charge to apply. A person who violates paragraph 1 is guilty of a Class 6 felony and a Class 5 felony for a second or subsequent violation. A person who violates paragraph 2 is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-2923. Stalking; Classification; Definitions. States that where a person engages in a course of conduct aimed at another person with the intent to cause the other person to reasonable fear for the person’s safety – including through use of an electronic, digital or GPS system to surveil a specific person or a specific person’s internet activity – a crime is committed. This is deemed to be a Class 5 felony. However, if the victim is led to fear the death of themselves or of a close family member it becomes a Class 3 felony.
  • ARS §13-3019. Surreptitious Photographing, Videotaping, Filming or Digitally Recording or Viewing; Exemptions; Classification; Definitions. States that it is unlawful for a person to knowingly photograph, videotape, film, digitally record or by any other means secretly view, with or without a device, another person without that person’s consent under either of the following circumstances: (1) in a restroom, bathroom, locker room, bedroom or other location where the person has a reasonable expectation of privacy and the person is urinating, defecating, dressing, undressing, nude or involved in sexual intercourse or sexual contact; or (2) in a manner that directly or indirectly captures or allows the viewing of the person’s genitalia, buttock or female breast, whether clothed or unclothed, that is not otherwise visible to the public. Further, it is illegal to disclose, display, distribute or publish such a depiction without the consent or knowledge of the person depicted. A violation of either of these clauses is a Class 5 felony. If the person depicted is recognizable this is a Class 4 felony.
  • ARS §13-3201. Enticement of Persons for Purpose of Prostitution; Classification. States that a person who knowingly entices any other person into a house of prostitution, or elsewhere, for the purpose of prostitution with another person, is guilty of a Class 6 felony.
  • ARS §13-3202. Procurement by False Pretenses of Person for Purpose of Prostitution; Classification. States that a person who knowingly, by any false pretenses, false representations or other fraudulent means, procures any other person to have illicit carnal relation with another person, is guilty of a Class 6 felony.
  • ARS §13-3203. Procuring or Placing Persons In House of Prostitution; Classification. States that a person who knowingly receives money or other valuable thing, for, or on account of, procuring or placing in a house of prostitution, or elsewhere, any person for the purpose of prostitution is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3204. Receiving Earnings of Prostitute; Classification. States that a person who knowingly receives money or other valuable thing from the earnings of a person engaged in prostitution, is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3205. Causing Spouse to Become Prostitute; Classification. States that a person who knowingly by force, fraud, intimidation or threats, causes his or her spouse to live in a house of prostitution or to lead a life of prostitution, is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3206. Taking Child for Purpose of Prostitution; Classification. States that a person who takes away any minor from the minor’s father, mother, guardian or other person having the legal custody of the minor, for the purpose of prostitution, is guilty of a Class 4 felony. If the minor is under 15 years of age, taking a child for the purpose of prostitution is a Class 2 felony.
  • ARS §13.3207. Detention of Persons In House of Prostitution for Debt; Classification. States that a person who knowingly detains any person in a house of prostitution because of a debt such person has contracted or is said to have contracted, is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13.3208. Keeping or Residing In House of Prostitution; Employment in Prostitution; Classification. A person who knowingly is an employee of a house of prostitution is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. A person who knowingly operates or maintains a house of prostitution is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13.3209. Pandering; Methods; Classification. States that a person is guilty of a Class 5 felony if he/she knowingly: (1) Places any person in the charge or custody of any other person for purposes of prostitution; (2) places any person in a house of prostitution with the intent that such person become a prostitute or engage in an act of prostitution; (3) compels, induces or encourages any person to reside with that person, or with any other person, for the purpose of prostitution; or (4) compels, induces or encourages any person to become a prostitute or engage in an act of prostitution.
  • ARS §13.3210. Transporting Persons for Purpose of Prostitution or Other Immoral Purpose; Classification; Venue. States that a person knowingly transporting by any means of conveyance, through or across this state, any other person for the purposes of prostitution or concubinage, or for any other immoral purposes, is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3212. Child Prostitution; Classification; Increased Punishment. This section states that it is an offense to: cause a minor to engage in prostitution; use a minor for the purposes of prostitution; receive any benefit for placing a minor in prostitution; finance, manage, supervise, control or own prostitution activity involving a minor; or transport or finance the transportation of a minor with intent that he/she engages in prostitution. This is a Class 2 felony. Where the victim is under the age of 15, the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children. The section also states that any adult who engages in prostitution with a minor who he/she knows is aged 15, 16 or 17, is guilty of a Class 2 felony. Where the offender did not know that the child was aged 15, 16 or 17, the offense is deemed to be a Class 6 felony.
  • ARS §13-3214. Prostitution; Classification. States that it is unlawful for a person to knowingly engage in prostitution. It is an affirmative defense that the defendant committed acts of prostitution as a direct result of being a victim of sex trafficking. A person who violates this section is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. A person who has previously been convicted of three or more violations and commits a subsequent violation is guilty of this section is guilty of a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3417. Use of Wire Communication or Electronic Communication in Drug Related Transactions, Classification. Defines the offense of using electronic communication to facilitate the violation of any felony provision or to conspire to do so of this chapter (Imitation Substance or Drug Offense) or Chapter 23 (Organized Crime, Fraud, Terrorism) of this title. This is a Class 4 felony, unless the felony facilitated is a Class 5 or 6 felony, in which case the same classification as the felony facilitate will apply.
  • ARS §13-3502. Production, Publication, Sale, Possession and Presentation of Obscene Items; Classification. It is defined as an offense to produce, publish or possess with the intent to distribute any material considered to be obscene. This is a Class 5 felony.
  • ARS §13-3506. Furnishing Harmful Items to Minors. States that it is a Class 4 felony to furnish, present, provide, make available, give, lend, show, advertise or distribute any obscene or harmful material to a minor.
  • ARS §13-3506.01. Furnishing Harmful Items to Minors; Internet Activity; Classification; Definitions. This section states that it is unlawful to knowingly transmit or send any material that is harmful to minors to a minor via the Internet, email or personal messaging. This is a Class 4 felony offense. Failure to report a violation of this section is a Class 6 felony offense.
  • ARS §13-3507. Public Display of Explicit Sexual Materials; Classification; Definitions. States that it is a criminal offense to place obscene material on public display. Those who do so are guilty of a Class 6 felony. Failure to report a violation of this section is a Class 6 felony offense.
  • ARS §13-3512. Obscene or Indecent Telephone Communications to Minors for Commercial Purposes; Violation; Classification. This section states that it is unlawful for a person to knowingly make by means of telephone, directly or by a recording device any obscene or indecent communication for commercial purposes to a person under 18 years old, regardless of who made the phone call. A violation is a Class 4 felony.
  • ARS §13-3513. Sale or Distribution of Material Harmful to Minors through Vending Machines; Classification. States that it is unlawful for a person to knowingly display, sell, or offer to sell material harmful to minors in a vending machine. A violation is a Class 6 felony.
  • ARS §13-3552. Commercial Sexual Exploitation of a Minor. Defines the offense as employing, using, enticing, persuading, coercing or inducing a minor to engage in or assist others to engage in exploitive exhibition or other sexual conduct for the purpose of producing any visual depiction or live act, or to expose his/her genitals or anus, or the breast of a female minor. It is also an offense to transport or finance the transportation of a minor with intent to commit the above. The commercial exploitation of a minor is a Class 2 felony, punishable by up to five years’ imprisonment. If the minor is under 15 years of age the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children.
  • ARS §13-3553. Sexual Exploitation of a Minor; Evidence; Classification. Defines the sexual exploitation of a minor as knowingly: recording, filming, photographing, developing or duplicating any visual depiction of a minor engaged in sexual conduct; distributing, transporting, exhibiting, receiving, sending, purchasing, electronically transmitting, possessing or exchanging any such depiction. Sexual exploitation of a minor is a Class 2 felony. If the minor is under 15 years of age the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children.
  • ARS §13-3554. Luring a Minor for Sexual Exploitation; Classification. States that it is a crime to offer or solicit sexual conduct with another person with knowledge or reason to know that they are a minor. This is a Class 3 felony offense. Where the victim is under the age of fifteen, the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children.
  • ARS §13-3558. Admitting Minors to Public Displays of Sexual Conduct; Constructive Knowledge of Age; Classification. States it is unlawful to admit a person under 18 into any business establishment where persons, in the course of their employment, expose their genitals, anus, or the areola or nipple of the female breast. An owner, operator or employee who wrongfully admits a person without evidence of their age is deemed to have constructive knowledge of his/her age. A violation is a Class 6 felony.
  • ARS §13-3560. Aggravated Luring a Minor for Sexual Exploitation; Classification; Definitions. This section states that the offense of luring a minor for sexual exploitation is aggravated if the offender used an electronic communication device to transmit at least one visual depiction that is harmful to minors and then solicits or offers sexual conduct with that minor. This is defined as a Class 2 felony. If the minor is under 15 years of age the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children.
  • ARS §13-3561. Unlawful Age Misrepresentation; Classification; Definition. States that a person 18 years of age or older commits a criminal offense where, with knowledge or reason to know that the person to whom they are communicating with is a minor, they misrepresent their age for the purpose of committing a previously listed sexual offense. This is a Class 3 felony. Where the victim is under the age of 15, the offense is deemed a dangerous crime against children.
  • ARS §13-3562. Notice to Communication Service Provider of Website Hosting Alleged Sexual Exploitation of Children. States that if a law enforcement agency receives information that a communication service provider is hosting a website that contains an alleged violation of this chapter, the law enforcement agency shall notify the communication service provider by serving a notice of the alleged violation on the statutory agent of the communication service provider. The notice shall include specific information on the location of the alleged violation.
  • ARS §13-3821. Persons Required to Register; Procedure; Identification Card; Assessment; Definitions. Requires registered sex offenders moving to Arizona to register if they will be in the state for more than ten days. A limited number of sex offenders on probation can reside in any one multi-family dwelling. The sections also stipulate that Level 3 sex offenders may not reside within 1,000 feet of a school or a day care center.
  • ARS §13-3825. Community Notification. States the requirements for notifying a community of a sex offender’s release from confinement. The offender’s identifying information, risk assessment and date of release must be entered into a database within 72 hours of his/her release. This section also describes the notification requirements, as determined by the level of the offense.
  • ARS §13-3827. Internet Sex Offender Website; Investigation of Records; Immunity; Definition. States that the department of public safety must establish and maintain a sex offender website for offenders whose risk assessment has been determined to be a Level 2 or 3. The website shall include the offender’s name, age and address, a current photograph, the offense committed, and a risk assessment if applicable.
  • ARS §15-341. General Powers and Duties; Immunity; Delegation. This section requires schools to define and enforce policies and procedures to prevent and report bullying, harassment and intimidation on school grounds, within school properties and using electronic means. This includes a reporting process, informing students of their rights, protections and available support services should they be a victim of harassment, bullying or intimidation, and a disciplinary process.
  • ARS §15-514. Reports of Immoral or Unprofessional Conduct; Immunity. States that any certificated person or governing board member who reasonable suspects or receives an allegation that a person certificated by the state board of education has engaged in conduct involving minors subject to reporting requirements shall report it to the department of education no later than three business days after they become aware of a suspicion or allegation. Superintendents of school districts who suspects or receives allegations of an immoral or unprofessional act that is grounds for dismissal or criminal charges shall report it to the department of education.