Slovenia

Population

1,978,029

Population 0‑14

13.4%

Internet Users

72.8%

Facebook Users

850,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2017 - Safer Internet Day 2017 saw creation of Alliance to Better protect Minors Online This self-regulatory initiative launched a statement of purpose by affiliates on February 7, 2017, with the aim of creating a safer online world for children in the participating countries. The Slovenian Safer Internet Center also has resources for parents, kids, and a calendar of workshops for teachers on online safety issues.

2016 - Young Europeans Eurostat’s statistics interactive where Europeans can select their country (from a list of 31) and age (16-29) and compare themselves to others across a variety of topics, including internet use. There is also a link to the source data.

2015 - Assessment of Transversal Skills 2020 (ATS2020) Launched by the European Commission, this project will run in 11 EU countries through 2018. The project develops comprehensive learning model to enhance student transversal, 21st century skills across diverse EU national curricula, including the provision of teachers with modern approaches and innovative tools for the assessment of these skills.

2014 - e-skills in Europe - Country Report - Slovenia Notes rise in the number of informatics courses offered within the country at the grade school and undergraduate level, as well as young Slovenians remaining above the EU average for internet use.

2009 - Summary Report - Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe Eurydice report stating that online safety (OS) topics reach Slovenian students in secondary school.

2008 - The Development of eServices in an Enlarged EU: eLearning in Slovenia States that computer education was compulsory in primary schools, as well as that Slovenia had a one of the most computer literate youth populations in EU25, yet PC access in schools was notably low. So though these schools enjoyed advanced ICT access for the time (broadband etc), ICTs were not yet heavily incorporated across subjects. The report highlights opportunities for advancement in a country the size of Slovenia.

2007- Development Strategy for the Information Society in the Republic of Slovenia- si2010 Details how the Slovenian government envisioned an efficient and fully computerized national education system, enabling teachers and learners to acquire and pass on knowledge via modern IT technologies. The strategic goals of the si2010 concerning e-education included the establishment of a central educational Internet portal and user-tailored access to knowledge. To achieve this, the government planned to support the teaching community in integrating ICT in the classroom, to increase the accessibility and success of e-learning, as well as to establish a national educational portal.

2006 - Slovenian National e-Learning Strategy, 2006-2010, E-learning: Leading the field Outlines the vision of the Slovenian National e-Learning Strategy from 2006 to 2010. Namely, to establish an effective system of learning, supported by ICT, aiding constant innovation and rapid development, leading Slovenia to become a knowledge-based, successful society.

EU Safety Label

EU Safety Label is a program open to EU school to certify compliance with a number of online safety best practices. The website is available in 17 languages, including Slovenian.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Europe

The ITU is is the UN agency for ICTs. Areas of focus in Europe include improving E-accessibility in Central and Eastern Europe, transitioning Europe to digital broadcasting, and sharing best practices for implementing e-applications.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Ministry of Education, Science and Sport

The MES is responsible for the implementation of the national education policy and enforces educational legislation. It has the authority to decide on administrative matters related to pre-school education,basic education, secondary general, technical and vocational education, higher vocational education,education of children with special needs, music education, and adult education.

Safe.si - Center for Safer Internet

Safe.si is a Slovenian national awareness node that promotes and supports awareness aimed at the protection and education of children and teenagers using Internet and new online technologies. The partners in the consortium are the University of Ljubljana, The Faculty of Social Sciences, ARNES and the Slovenian Consumers’ Association. The project is part of the Safer Internet Plus Programme and is co-financed by the Information Society and Media Directorate-General within the European Commission and Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology.

Slovenian Computer Emergency Response Team (SI-CERT)

SI-CERT is the main contact point for reporting network security incidents involving systems and local networks. This is a service of the Academic and Research Network of Slovenia (ARNES).

Slovenian Education Portal (SIO)

SIO hosts a wealth of materials for all curriculum subjects and age groups. Teachers can also get support and advice on how to integrate the resources into the classroom, and exchange ideas in an online community.

Spletno Oko (Online Eye)

Spletno Oko is a service to anonymously report illegal Internet content. It specifically focuses on child sexual abuse imagery and hate speech online. Handling varies depending on the location of the server for the content, with content on Slovenian servers removed with help from Slovenian police.

Tom

Tom is a youth crisis hotline. By calling 116-111, young people can access a network of roughly 200 qualified advisors. Established in 1990, this helpline resource is under the Friends of Youth Association Slovenia (PSM) and conducts analysis of calls as well as connecting callers with resources. In addition to the phone number, there are web chats available, and many of their topics are web-centric. In May of 2017 they connected with their partner, Center for Safer Internet, to discuss web trends among young people.

Varni Na Internetu (Safe on the Internet)

A project implemented by SI-CERT with the overall objective of raising the public’s awareness on the safe use of the Internet. Activities are aimed at informing the public about online threats and strategies to stay safe, secure online banking, shopping and networking as well as the protection of personal information.

A Survey on the Transposition of Directive 2011/93/EU on Combating Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography (2016)

Together Against Sexual Exploitation of Children

The study examines how seven key provisions of Directive 2011/93/EU on the fight against sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography have been adopted by the 27 European Union (EU) Member States bound by the Directive.

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

The impact of internet and new media on the occurrence of violence against children in Europe and Cyprus (2015)

Rosella Sala

This document demonstrate that countries lack of expertise on child sexual exploitation and struggle combating this issue by their own. It suggests to establish an international legal framework to prosecute offenders and protect children.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Policy Influences and Country Clusters: A Comparative Analysis of Internet Safety Policy Implementation (2014)

B. O'Neill

The report examines the policy context of internet safety and looks at how countries within each cluster approach implementation.

Mapping Safer Internet Policies in the Member States (2014)

P. Baudouin, B. Mahieu, T. Dor, B. Good, J. Milayi, S. Nakajima

The purpose of the study was to set up a framework for analysing Better Internet for Children public policies covering EU Member States, and Norway and Iceland.

Country classification: opportunities, risks, harm and parental mediation (2013)

Helsper, E.J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B., and de Haan, J.

This report explores the range and type of online opportunities and risks experienced by children in each country. The ways in which parents mediate or regulate their children’s internet use is also examined.

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation (2013)

Helsper, E. J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B. and De Haan, J. with members of the EU Kids Online network

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

In their own words: what bothers children online? (2013)

Livingstone S., Kirwil, L., Ponte C. and Staksrud E., with the EU Kids Online network

The results of a survey of nearly 10,000 children in 25 countries across Europe, this report details what children say upsets them and their friends online

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

The Protection of Children Online (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

EU Kids Online: Excessive Internet Use among European Children (2012)

Smahel, D, Helsper, E, Green, L, Kalmus, V, Blinka, L, Ólafsson, K,

This report uses the data from the EU Kids Online study to examine excessive use of the Internet by children in the 25 participating countries.

Excessive Internet Use by European Children (2012)

D. Smahel, E. Helsper, L. Green, V. Kalmus, L. Blinka, K. Ólafsson

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children.

Risks and safety on the internet: The perspective of European children. Full Findings (2011)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., Ólafsson, K

Building on the original study, EU Kids Online I, this second piece of research includes the findings from research which took place in 25 countries. Children in the 9 – 16 age group were surveyed on their experiences of online use, risk and safety

ICT in the Education of the Balkan Countries (2010)

Dr. Rossita Penkova, Dr. Violeta Mircheva, Nikolina Tsvetkova, Mirena Legurska

This is a comprehensive document on the situation of the ICT in education in the Balkan countries.

EU Kids Online: Final report (2009)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L.

One of the foremost pieces of research into the online habits of children in the European Union is the EU Kids Online research, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Plus Programme between 2006 and 2009.

Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe (2009)

Eurydice

The study covers 30 European countries and provides information on whether online safety is taught and how it is taught in schools within the participating countries.

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU - a parents' perspective (2008)

Eurobarometer

The study covers 27 EU Member States and provides parental responses to a range of questions relating to Internet safety and their perception of risk.

Safer Internet for Children and Adolescents in the new Member States. Full Report (2004)

Eurobarometer

This report covers the ten accession countries of the time: Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent for sexual activity in Slovenia is fifteen. The age of majority is eighteen, as is the age of consent for marriage. However, under certain conditions, the court may allow marriage from the age of sixteen.

Slovenia has signed, ratified and entered into law the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (November 2001).

  • Article 158, Penal Code. Insult. Imposes a penalty of a fine or imprisonment for up to three months for anyone who insults another person. If the offense was committed through the press, radio, television or other means of public information or at a public assembly, an increased punishment of a fine or imprisonment for up to six months will apply. If the injured party returns the insult, the Court may punish both parties or one of them, or may remit the sentence.

  • Article 159, Penal Code. Defamation. This Article states that it is an offense to assert or circulate anything untruthful about another person which is capable of damaging the defamed’s honor or reputation and which the offender knows to be false. The offense is punishable by a fine or imprisonment for up to six months. Where the offense was committed through the press, radio, television or other means of public information or at a public assembly, an increased punishment of a fine or imprisonment for up to one year will apply. If the untruth is of such nature that it may bring grave consequences for the victim, the perpetrator will be liable to imprisonment for up to two years.

  • Article 160, Penal Code. Injurious Accusation. Defines the offense of asserting or circulating anything about another person which is capable of causing damage to the honor or reputation of the victim. The offense is punishable by a fine or imprisonment for up to three months. Where the offense was committed through the press, radio, television or other means of public information or at a public assembly, an increased punishment of a fine or imprisonment for up to six months will apply. If the untruth is of such nature that it may bring grave consequences for the victim, the perpetrator will be liable to a fine or imprisonment for up to one year. If the offender can prove either the truth of his assertions or that they had reasonable cause to believe them to be true, they will not be punished for injurious accusations but either for insult (Article 158) or for reproach of a criminal offense with the intention to disparage (Article 162).

  • Article 170, Penal Code. Rape. This Article states that anyone who compels another person to have sexual intercourse by force or threat of imminent attack on life or body is liable to imprisonment for one to ten years. Where the offense was committed in an atrocious or especially humiliating manner, or successively by several persons, a penalty of three to fifteen years’ imprisonment will apply. If the offender committed the offense by threatening the victim with the disclosure of a secret which could damage the victim’s reputation or honor, or their next of kin’s honor or reputation, or which could cause large property damage, a prison sentence between six months to five years will apply.

  • Article 171, Penal Code. Sexual Violence. States that anyone who uses force or threatens a person with imminent attack on life or body to compel the person to submit or endure any sexual act not covered by the preceding Article will be liable to imprisonment for between six months to ten years. Where the offense was committed in an atrocious or especially humiliating manner, or successively by several persons, a penalty of three to fifteen years’ imprisonment will apply. If the offender committed the offense by threatening the victim with the disclosure of a secret which could damage the victim’s reputation or honor, or their next of kin’s honor or reputation, or which could cause significant property damage, a prison sentence of up to five years will apply.

  • Article 173. Penal Code. Sexual Assault on a Person Younger Than Fifteen Years. Defines the offense of having sexual intercourse or another sexual act with a person below the age of fifteen. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for a term of between three to eight years. A punishment of five to fifteen years’ imprisonment will apply if the victim is a frail person below the age of fifteen. Where the offense was committed by a teacher, educator, guardian, adoptive parent, parent, priest, medical doctor or any other person who through the abuse of his position has sexual intercourse or performs any sexual act with a person under the age of fifteen years and which is entrusted to him to teach, raise, protect or care for, will be sentenced to imprisonment for between three and ten years. The Article also states that whomever, under any of the circumstances above, violates in any other manner the sexual integrity of a person under the age of fifteen, will be sentenced to imprisonment for up to five years.

  • Article 175, Penal Code. Abuse of Prostitution. This Article states that it is an offense to participate for exploitative purposes in the prostitution of another, or to instruct, obtain or encourage another person to engage in prostitution with force, threat or deception. The offense is punishable with imprisonment for a term of between three months to five years. Where the crime is committed against a minor or more than one person, or where the offender acts as part of an organized group, an aggravated penalty of imprisonment for one to ten years will apply.

  • Article 176, Penal Code. Presentation, Manufacture, Possession and Distribution of Pornographic Material. States that anyone who sells, presents or publicly exhibits documents, pictures or audiovisual or other items of a pornographic nature to a person under fifteen years of age, enables them to gain access to these in any other way or shows them a pornographic performance will be liable to a fine or a prison sentence of not more than two years. The Article also states that anyone who abuses a minor in order to produce pictures or audiovisual or other items of a pornographic nature, or uses a minor in a pornographic performance, shall be sentenced to imprisonment for between six months and five years. The same penalty applies to anyone who produces, distributes, sells, imports or exports pornographic material depicting minors, supplies it in any other way, or possesses such material with the intention of producing, distributing, selling, importing, exporting it or supplying it in any other way. If an offense in this paragraph was committed by an organized group, the punishment will increase to one to eight years’ imprisonment. Any pornographic material will be confiscated or its use disabled in some other manner.

  • Amendments - 2015 - Forced Marriages of Underage Persons
    Amendments to the Criminal Code address forced marriages, stating a person responsible for a forced marriage can be imprisoned for three years, or five years when these offenses take place against a minor or impoverished person (Article 17 of the Amendments).