Maine

Population

1,329,328

Population 0‑18

19.5%

Internet Users

80.5%

Home Internet Subscribers

84.2%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2000 - Former Governor Angus King created the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) to provide the necessary tools and professional development to middle school and high school students in Maine. MLTI has five core operational goals: equity, integration with Maine’s Learning Results, sustainability/ avoiding obsolescence, teacher preparation and professional development and economic development .Through this initiative, funding was provided to equip all seventh and eighth grade students with portable computers.

2006- Maine Governor’s Children’s Cabinet created a guide for parents on the best practices in bullying and harassment prevention. Within this guide, there are suggestions on how to create a safe cyberspace and how to prevent cyber bullying.

2009- Because of Act 19153(2)(A)-(G), the Maine Department of Education is required to approve of online education providers. The Maine Online Learning Program was established to provide high-quality learning through online programs and courses for kindergarten through 12th graders.

2011- The Department of Education created Education Evolving, which is a plan towards building an education system in Maine that meets the needs of all students. As part of this plan, the Department of Education is focusing on the changing technological world and how this can benefit different students. Using the “Anytime, Anywhere learning”, students can have access to online and digital learning that is most effective for them.

2012- In accordance with the An Act to Prohibit Bullying and Cyberbullying in Schools, schools are required to address bullying behavior to ensure that students feel safe and included in their learning environment.

Crimes in Maine are classified with letters from A to E, with Class A crimes being the most serious. The terms of imprisonment for each class of crime are as follows:

  • Class A: imprisonment term up to 30 years
  • Class B: imprisonment term up to ten years
  • Class C: imprisonment term up to five years
  • Class D: imprisonment term up to one year in the county jail
  • Class E: imprisonment term up to six months in the county jail

In addition to terms of imprisonment, the court may order suspended sentences, fines and periods of probation. Those deemed to be repeat sexual assault offenders (that is, they have previously been convicted of any of a number of sex offenses, not only assault) can have a longer prison term imposed. Where the victim of a crime was aged under twelve at the time of the crime, the court must give the victim’s age serious consideration when considering sentencing. Details of the sentences available for crimes other than murder is available here: http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/17-A/title17-Asec1252.html

  • Maine Revised Statutes (MRS) Title 17-A §210-A. Stalking. This section states that a person is guilty of the offense if they intentionally embark on a course of conduct directed at one person which would cause a reasonable person to suffer emotional distress, to fear death or serious injury to themselves or to a close relation or to fear the destruction of their property. This is classified as a Class D crime.
  • MRS 17-A §253. Gross Sexual Assault. States that it is a crime to engage in a sexual act with, amongst others, a person who has not yet reached the age of fourteen. This is defined as a Class A offense. Where the offender has a supervisory role over a student who has yet to reach the age of eighteen it is deemed to be a Class C offense. Where the offense was committed against a child under the age of twelve, a minimum prison term of twenty years will apply.
  • MRS 17-A §254. Sexual Abuse of Minors. The offense is defined as engaging in a sex act with a person who is either fourteen or fifteen and where the offender is at least five years older. This is a Class D crime. Where the offender is ten years older than the victim, the crime is classified as Class C offense. Where the person is 21 and they engage in a sex act with someone aged sixteen or seventeen with whom they have a teacher/student relationship it is deemed to be a Class E crime.
  • MRS 17-A §255-A. Unlawful Sexual Contact. This section states, among other things, that it is an offense to participate in any sexual contact with a person under the age fourteen where the offender is at least three years older. Violation of this is a Class C crime. In cases that involve actual penetration it becomes a Class B offense. Where the victim of the sexual contact is under the age of twelve and the offender is at least three years older, it is classed as a Class B crime; actual penetration elevates the offense to a Class A crime. If the victim is aged fourteen or fifteen and the offender is at least ten years older, sexual contact is deemed to be a Class D offense. Where the child is less than twelve and the offender is at least three years older it becomes a Class B offense; if the sexual contact includes penetration it becomes a Class A crime.
  • MRS 17-A §256. Visual Sexual Aggression Against Child. It is defined as an offense where a person who is over eighteen exposes their genitals, for the purpose of arousing or satisfying sexual desire, to a person who is not yet fourteen. This is a Class D crime. Where the child is under twelve then it becomes a Class C crime. In the case where the offender engages in surveillance, video or otherwise, of the uncovered breasts, buttocks, genitals, anus or pubic area of a child under fourteen then he is liable for a Class D crime. Where the child is less than twelve years of age it is a Class C offense. In both cases the victim must have an expectation of privacy.
  • MRS 17-A §258. Sexual Misconduct with a Child Under 14 Years of Age. This section defines the crime of showing sexually explicit materials to a child under fourteen by an adult with the intent to encourage the child to engage in a sexual act. Violation of this section carries a Class D penalty. Where the child is under twelve it is a Class C offense.
  • MRS 17-A §260. Unlawful Sexual Touching. Defines as a crime the situation where the offender subjects another person, who is under fourteen and at least five years younger than the offender, to sexual touching. This is classified as a Class D crime.
  • MRS 17-A §261. Prohibited Contact with a Minor; Sex Offender Restricted Zone. States that a person is guilty where they have been convicted of a sexual crime against a child under fourteen and they then initiate direct or indirect contact with another child under fourteen. This is defined as a Class E crime. Where the original offense was against a child of less than twelve and contact is initiated against a child under fourteen then it is a Class D offense.
  • MRS 17-A §282. Sexual Exploitation of Minor. States that a person is guilty of an offense under this section if they employ or solicit (amongst others) a minor to engage in sexually explicit conduct, knowing that it will be recorded or photographed. This is a Class B crime. Where this is a second offense it becomes a Class A crime. If the child is under twelve then it is automatically a Class A offense. Where a parent permits this to happen they are guilty of a Class B offense.
  • MRS 17-A §283. Dissemination of Sexually Explicit Material. This section states that it is an offense to disseminate or possess material that depicts a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct. The material may be in many forms including books or computer data files. Possession of more than ten units gives rise to the presumption that the offender had intent to disseminate the material. This is a Class C crime. Where the child appears to be under twelve the offense is classified as Class B, whilst previous convictions on the part of the adult increase the sentence available by one class. The law allows minors to be prosecuted under this section and, if tried outside the juvenile court, could lead to sex offender registration.
  • MRS 17-A §284. Possession of Sexually Explicit Material. This section outlaws the possession, purchase or transport of images (whether electronically or printed) depicting a child under sixteen engaging in sexually explicit conduct. This is considered to be a Class D crime. It is elevated to a Class C crime where the child is under twelve. Previous convictions for these offenses increase the penalty by one level.
  • MRS 17-A §285. Forfeiture of Equipment Used to Facilitate Violations. The offender upon a request by the State may forfeit equipment used to facilitate the above offenses.
  • MRS 17-A §506. Harassment by Telephone or by Electronic Communication Device. States that a person is guilty of this offense if they contact another person, without consent, by means of electronic communication device or telephone and make any obscene or offensive comment, suggestion or request, or anonymously with intent to annoy, threaten, abuse or alarm the receiver. The offense is deemed to be a Class E crime.
  • MRS 17-A §852. Aggravated Sex Trafficking. This section states that anyone who promotes the prostitution of a minor under the age of eighteen is guilty of a Class B offense.
  • MRS 17-A §854. Indecent Conduct. Decrees that it is an offense to engage in a sexual act or expose one’s genitals in a public place, which is deemed to be a Class E crime. Any subsequent offense is a Class D crime. The section also states that anyone who exposes one’s genitals in a private place, with intent to be seen from another private or public place, is guilty of a Class E offense; subsequent offenses aggravate the crime by one degree.
  • MRS 20-A §1001. Duties of School Board. States, among other things, that school boards have to adopt a student code of conduct, establishing policies and procedures to address bullying and harassment.