Indiana

Population

6,619,680

Population 0‑18

24.0%

Home Internet Subscribers

77.7%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2012 – In accordance with IC 20-32-6-1, schools must submit reports to the IDOE by July 1, regarding the number of reported bullying incidents involving a student, by category, among other reports.

2012- After changes to Public Law 73-2011, which altered state and local textbook adoption procedures, rules were relaxed to allow schools to choose whatever textbooks met their individual needs, including the purchasing of books in whatever format they wanted, such as e-book or print. Many schools started 1:1 initiatives and used digital books.

2013 – After a previous Indiana law was amended to incorporate safe school committees on bullying into K-12 schooling, Indiana DOE developed appropriate lesson plans, kits, and resources for schools and teachers to present bullying prevention information to students.

2013- Six school districts were given the Imagining and Creating Grant from the Indiana State Board of Education to focus on creating quality digital content. These districts formed the Digital Content Consortium and over 700 lessons were curated and assembled in one place for Indiana teachers.

2014 – IDOE adopted a program that allows schools to hold “virtual school” during either an inclement weather day, or on a make-up day at the end of the year where instruction can still persist despite the physical school being closed for the day. Districts must be able to prove that all students and teachers will have internet access and access to each other for help and questions throughout the virtual school day. Districts will have until 9 a.m. to send students their goals for the day.

2016- The Office of eLearning in the Indiana State Board of Education was awarded a $20,000 Teaching with Primary Sources Regional Grant from the Library of Congress. This allowed teachers involved in the Digital Content Consortium to become Level 1 and Level 2 certified by the LOC on how best to use primary sources in a classroom.

2016- Because of their Digital Content Curation campaign Indiana is named as one of the initial states in the #GoOpen Campaign from the US Office of Educational Technology in the Department of Education. The #GoOpen Campaign encourages states to uses openly licensed educational materials to transform teaching and learning for students.

Indiana Attorney General

The IN Attorney General has a tab for Internet crimes and cyberbullying, and resulting support services

Indiana Department of Education

The DOE has introduced many anti-bullying laws and policies as a result of new state laws that school districts have to adhere to.

Indiana Internet Crimes Against Children

This program aims to reduce the number of children being victimized online by predators, and provides trainings at schools to identify these problems.

Indiana State Library

The Indiana State Library has a patron code of conduct clause that allows libraries to police the websites visited on their computers for appropriateness or inappropriateness.

Net Literacy

Net Literacy is an NGO that teaches digital literacy to the elderly and adults, through volunteer services, and also donates hardware and software.

Prevent Child Abuse Indiana

PCA has a tab on how parents can keep their children safe online, and how to monitor their child’s online presence.

Preliminary Analysis of Indiana Adults' Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Surveys on Sexual Assault (2015)

Y. Shin, U. Amarasinghe, M. Breidenbach, A. Harsin, J. Parrish-Sprowl

This study looks at Indiana adults' adverse childhood experiences regarding sexual assault.

A Guidebook for Broadband Internet Expansion in Rural Areas of Indiana (2015)

T. Johnson

This thesis looks into the expansion of broadband Internet for rural areas of Indiana using legislation, case studies, and funding options.

Principal Perceptions About the Implementation and Effectiveness of Online Learning in Public High School in Indiana (2015)

T.W. Rayle

This dissertation examines principal perceptions about the implementation and effectivemenss of online learning in public high schools in Indiana.

Use of Social Media by Indiana Principals and Superintendents (2014)

R. Griffin, Jr.

This dissertation examines the use of social media by Indiana K-12 principals and superintendents.

Picture This: Legal Consequences of Teen Sexting, an Interview with Laurie Gray, Former Deputy Prosecuter of Allen County, Indiana (2010)

R. O'Connor

This article looks into the legal ramifications of sexting in Indiana in an interview with a former deputy prosecuter.

Attitudes of Indiana Special Education Teachers towards the Use and Implementation of Assistive Technology (2008)

B. Guggenberger

This dissertation examines the attitudes of Indiana k-12 special education teachers regarding the use of Assistive Technology to improve the educations of their students in preparation for standardized testing.

"It Is Just Easier To Do What You Did Before...": An Update on Internet Use in Secondary Social Studies Classrooms in Indiana (2008)

P. VanFossen, R. Waterson

This study replicated a 1999 study asking secondary social studies teachers about their Internet use in the classroom, for comparison purposes 6 years later.

Studying Indiana Public Libraries' Usage of Internet Filters (2005)

A. Comer

This article examines the usage of Internet filtering software in Indiana Public Libraries.

An Analysis of the Use of the Internet and World Wide Web by Secondary Social Studies Teachers in Indiana (2000)

P. VanFossen

This study looks into the Internet usage of secondary social studies teachers in their classrooms and the purposes of using the Internet.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent in Indiana is 16 years old.

In Indiana, sentencing for felony crimes is as follows, unless otherwise stated within an individual section:

  • Level 1 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of twenty years and a maximum term of 40 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.
  • Level 2 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of ten years and a maximum term of 30 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.
  • Level 3 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of three years and a maximum term of 16 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.
  • Level 4 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of two years and a maximum term of 12 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.
  • Level 5 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of one year and a maximum term of 6 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.
  • Level 6 Felony incurs a minimum term of imprisonment of six months and a maximum term of 2.5 years. A fine of up to $10,000 may also be levied.

The sentencing for crimes deemed to be misdemeanors is as follows, unless otherwise stated within an individual section:

  • Class A misdemeanor incurs a term of imprisonment no more than one year. A fine of up to $5,000 may also be levied.
  • Class B misdemeanor incurs a term of imprisonment of no more than 180 days. A fine of up to $1,000 may also be levied.
  • Class C misdemeanor incurs a term of imprisonment of no more than 60 days. A fine of up to $500 may also be levied.

  • Indiana Code (IC) 20-26-5-33. Programs Concerning Consequences of Sharing Sexually Suggestive or Explicit Materials through Digital Media. States a school corporation may offer classes, instruction, or programs regarding the potential risks and consequences of creating and sharing sexually suggestive or explicit materials through cellular telephones, social networking web sites, computer networks, and other digital media.
  • IC 35-42-3.5-1. Promotion of human trafficking; sexual trafficking of a minor; human trafficking. States that anyone who recruits, harbors, or transports another person into forced labor or involuntary servitude, or to force the other person into marriage, prostitution or to participate in sexual conduct, is guilty of a Level 4 felony. If the other person is a child less than eighteen or sixteen years of age, then they are guilty of a Level 3 felony. A person who is at least eighteen years old who sells or transfers custody of a child less than eighteen years of age for the purpose of prostitution commits a Level 2 felony. But a person who pays, offers to pay, or agrees to pay money or property for an individual who has been forced into labor, servitude, or prostitution commits human trafficking, incurring a Level 5 felony.
  • IC 35-42-4-3. Child Molesting. The section defines as an offense where a child under the age of fourteen years old is submitted to sexual intercourse or deviate sexual conduct. It is deemed to be a Level 3 felony which may be increased to Level 1, with a sentence of between 20 and 40 years’ imprisonment, when the offender is over 21 years old. A person who performs any fondling or touching of either the adult or a child under fourteen years of age with intent to arouse or to satisfy the sexual desires of either the child or the older person is guilty of a Level 4 felony, with a jail sentence of between two and twelve years, but could increase to a Level 2 felony if there is threatened deadly force.
  • IC 35-42-4-4. Child Exploitation; Possession of Child Pornography; Exemptions; Defenses. Defines the offense as knowingly or intentionally managing or producing (among other definitions) any performance or incident of sexual conduct by a child under eighteen years old and then disseminating, exhibiting that to another person or making available a computer knowing that the fixed drive or peripheral device depicts such images of sexual conduct. They commit a Level 5 felony, with a minimum sentence of 1 year and a maximum sentence of 6 years. A person who knowingly or intentionally possesses a picture, drawing or other item that depicts or describes sexual conduct by a child who the person knows is less than sixteen years of age, which lacks serious literary, artistic value, is guilty of a Level 6 felony which incurs a sentence of between six months and two and one half years imprisonment. It is a valid defense to a charge under this section if all of the following apply: the image was produced, possessed or disseminated via a cell phone, other wireless communication device or social networking website; the offender is under the age of 22 and no more than four years older than the depicted minor or the person who received the image; the offender and victim were in a dating relationship or ongoing personal relationship; the recipient of the image or depicted person consented in the defendant’s actions. However, this defense does not apply if the image is disseminated to a person other than the one depicted or the one who sent the image.
  • IC 35-42-4-5. Vicarious Sexual Gratification; Sexual Conduct in Presence of a Minor. Defines the offense as when a person of eighteen years or older directs, aids or induces, among other definitions, a child under the age of sixteen to touch or fondle himself or another child under that age with the intent to arouse or satisfy the sexual desires of a child or the older person. The offense is deemed to be a Level 5 felony. This becomes a Level 4 felony where the child is under fourteen years of age. A person of eighteen years or older who knowingly or intentionally directs, aids, induces, or causes a child under the age of sixteen to engage in sexual intercourse with a child under sixteen, with an animal or in deviate sexual conduct is guilty of a Level 4 felony. Where a person over the age of eighteen knowingly engages in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual conduct or touches or fondles the person’s own body in the presence of a child under fourteen with the intent to arouse or satisfy the sexual desires of the child or the older person then they are guilty of a Level 6 felony.
  • IC 35-42-4-6. Child Solicitation. States that where a person over the age of eighteen intentionally solicits a child under fourteen to engage in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual conduct or any fondling or touching intended to arouse or satisfy the sexual desires of either the child or the older person, they are guilty of a Level 5 felony. This is upgraded to a Level 4 offense where a computer network is used or if the offender has a previous conviction.
  • IC 35-42-4-7. Child Seduction. Defines the offense of a person aged over eighteen who is a guardian, adoptive parent, adoptive grandparent, custodian, or stepparent, child care worker or military recruiter and engages with the child in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual conduct or fondling or touching with intent to arouse. This is a Level 6 felony with a sentence of between 6 months and 2.5 years.
  • IC 35-42-4-9. Sexual Misconduct with a Minor. This section states that any adult who performs or submits a child aged between fourteen and sixteen to sexual intercourse or deviate sexual conduct is guilty of a Level 5 felony, which becomes a Level 4 felony where the adult is aged over 21 and a Level 1 felony when deadly force is threatened. Where the person over eighteen performs or submits the child to touching or fondling it is deemed to be a Level 6 felony, which is increased to a Level 5 felony where the adult is over 21 or Level 2 felony if there is threatened deadly force.
  • IC 35-42-4-10. Unlawful Employment Near Children. States that any convicted sexually violent predator or offender against children, who knowingly or intentionally works for compensation or as a volunteer at a school, in a youth program or in a public park is guilty of a Level 6 felony.
  • IC 35-42-4-11. Sex Offender Residency Restrictions. States that a convicted sex offender may not reside within 1,000 feet of a school, youth program center or public park or within one mile of the residence of the victim. If they do so then it is deemed to be a Level 6 felony.
  • IC 35-42-4-12. Sex Offender Internet Offense. States that a person who is required to registered as a sexual offender commits a Class A misdemeanor if they use a social networking website or instant messaging or chat room to communicate directly with a child less than sixteen years of age. This offense is a Level 6 felony if the person has a prior unrelated conviction.
  • IC 35-42-4-13. Inappropriate Communication with a Child. States that it is an offense for a person over 18 to communicate with a child under fourteen on matters concerning sexual activity with the intent to gratify the sexual desires of the person. This is deemed to be a Class B misdemeanor that becomes Class A misdemeanor when a computer network is used.
  • IC 35-45-2-1. Intimidation. Defines the offense as when a person threatens another person with the intent of causing the other to engage in conduct against their will. The offense is deemed to be a Class A misdemeanor.
  • IC 35-45-2-2. Harassment. Defines the offense as, among other things, using a computer network or other form of electronic communication to communicate with a person with intent to harass, annoy or alarm the receiver, or to transmit an obscene message. This is deemed to be a Class B misdemeanor.
  • IC 35-45-4-1. Public Indecency. This section states that anyone who knowingly or intentionally engages in sexual intercourse, deviant sexual conduct, appears in a state of nudity or fondles the person’s genitals commits a Class A misdemeanor. A person over the age of eighteen who intends to be seen by a child under sixteen is also guilty of a Class A misdemeanor. If the offender has a previous conviction for this offense it becomes a Level 6 felony.
  • IC 35-45-4-4. Promoting Prostitution. This section states that anyone who entices or compels another person to become a prostitute, or procures a person for the purpose of prostitution, is guilty of a Level 5 felony. This is aggravated to a Level 4 felony if the victim is under the age of eighteen. The same applies for anyone who receives money or other property from a prostitute, or directs another person to a place of prostitution.
  • IC 35-45-4-5. Voyeurism; Public Voyeurism. Defines the offense as being committed by a person who “peeps” either by entering private property or by peeping into an area where occupants can be expected to disrobe, such as a restroom or dressing room. The offense is deemed to be a Class B misdemeanor. However it becomes a Level 6 felony where it is committed with a camera or if the person committing the offense has a prior unrelated conviction. The term “peep” is defined as any looking of a secretive nature.
  • IC 35-45-10-5. Criminal Stalking. States that a person who stalks another is guilty of a Level 6 felony. This may increase to a Level 4 felony where the person is in possession of a deadly weapon or certain additional factors are present.
  • IC 35-49-3-1. Sale, Distribution, or Exhibition of Obscene Matter. States that it is an offense to bring to Indiana or offer for distribution any material of an obscene nature. This is deemed to be a Class A misdemeanor but becomes a Level 6 felony where it is seen to depict anyone who is, or appears to be, under the age of eighteen.
  • IC 35-49-3-2. Obscene Performance. States that it is an offense to engage in or exhibit an obscene performance. The offense is deemed to be a Class A misdemeanor but becomes a Level 6 felony where the participants appear to be under the age of eighteen years of age.
  • IC 35-49-3-3. Dissemination of Matter or Conducting Performance Harmful to Minors. This section states that anyone who knowingly disseminates material to minors that is, in itself, harmful to them is guilty of a Level 6 felony. This includes showing the content to a child, placing it where a child can see it or engaging in a performance. This only applies to dissemination through the Internet if the content is obscene, it is child pornography or the content is sent to a child of less than eighteen or the sender believed them to be so.
  • IC 35-49-3-4. Defense to Prosecution for Dissemination of Matter or Conducting Performance Harmful to Minors. States, among other things, that it is a valid defense to a charge under IC 35-49-3-3 (and all other provisions of IC-3-49-3) if all of the following apply: the image was produced, possessed or disseminated via a cell phone, other wireless communication device or social networking website; the offender is under the age of 22 and no more than four years older than the depicted minor or the person who received the image; the offender and victim were in a dating relationship or ongoing personal relationship; the recipient of the image or depicted person consented in the defendant’s actions. However, this defense does not apply if the image is disseminated to a person other than the one depicted or the one who sent the image.