Hawaii

Population

1,431,603

Population 0‑18

21.7%

Internet Users

75.4%

Home Internet Subscribers

85.0%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2007 – An acceptable use policy for internet use in Hawaiian Public Libraries was approved. The section on minors’ internet use states that the library does not serve in place of parents and library staff will not extensively supervise children when they go online. The policy also instructs parents to teach their children to protect their personal information online.

Also in 2007, the education department created the Online Learning Task Force, charged with creating a plan to expand online learning opportunities. The task force set the following goals for 2010: 10,000 public school students will take at least one online course during their school experience, all public secondary school students will have access to learning material to help them meet proficiency standards and graduate on time, and 500 teachers will have completed online teaching training. By 2012, all public secondary school students were to have access to online Advanced Placement courses on STEM topics.

2008 – The Board of Education’s Policy 2170.1, which provides Internet Access regulations, was last amended. It states that email will be monitored and that all schools must have web filtering in place to block access to a range of prohibited topics. The state’s Network Support Services Branch (NSSB) provides filtering at a state level and has purchased licenses so that schools may install the WebSense system and impose additional filtering controls at no additional charge. The policy bars offensive and hateful messages, as well as access to pornography and adult entertainment.

2009 – The Board of Education in Hawaii approved Policy 1110-12, which states that Internet access supports the efforts of the Department of Education and the Hawaii State Public Library System, enhancing educational and research activities and actively assisting in developing ICT literacy. It also states that in public schools, priority must be given to student/classroom educational use. The Department of Education is expected to provide training to ensure students use technology appropriately and ethically.

2011 – The State Department of Education’s Strategic Plan 2011-2018 took effect, and has since been updated. The plan includes the goals of making all students effective technology users and maintaining safe schools.

The same year, Hawaii passed the Safe Schools Act. The law requires the State Department of Education to maintain, monitor and enforce anti-bullying and anti-harassment policies to protect students. The policies must be applicable to grades K-12 and define cyberbullying. The DOE is also required to conduct annual trainings at schools on how to promote respect and intervene when any form of bullying or harassment occurs. It must have mechanisms for reporting bullying incidents and promptly investigate any such complaints.

2013 – The State Legislature allocated $8.2 million to fund the Access Learning pilot project in Hawaiian schools. The project provided professional development and laptops for teachers in the fall semester, and one-to-one laptops for students in the spring for eight schools. In the second year of the project, school staff were given more professional development and the results were evaluated.

The same year, the Hawaii State Public Library System began offering free, three-week netbook computer loan programs in 37 libraries. The laptops are internet compatible, contain Microsoft Office 2010, and online magazine subscriptions. The program was funded by federal Library Services and Technology Act grant.

2015 – More than 130 schools participated in the Hour of Code, hosted by the nonprofit Code.org during Computer Science Education Week. The event aimed to inspire schools to use computer programming to enhance education.

Child Welfare Services

Part of the Department of Human Services, CWS includes information for mandatory reporters of child abuse, as well as programs for child protection and family support.

Curriculum Research and Development Group

This research unit within the University of Hawaii at Manoā’s College of Education conducts research and creates, evaluates, and supports educational programs for pre-K through 12 educators. Its learning technology faculty develop more effective uses of technology for classrooms and professional development for teachers.

E-School

The State Department of Education provides online classes for all Hawaiian students through its E-School. These classes are supplemental and support the objectives of the Department’s strategic plan. Students are generally expected to use their own personal computers with an internet connection to access the courses.

Friends of Hawaii Robotics

This organization aims to build Hawaiian students’ skills through technology education. Its programs include robotics education, robotics competitions and STEM learning.

Hawaii Children’s Trust Fund

This nonprofit focuses on child abuse and neglect, working toward strengthening families. It provides resources for parents, community members and professionals in the field.

Hawaii Internet and Technology Crimes Unit (HITeC)

The Hawaii Internet and Technology Crimes Unit investigates and prosecutes technology-related crimes which have been committed against individuals, such as Internet fraud and identity theft.

Hawaii Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force

The Task Force’s website contains prevention and educational resources aimed at protecting children online. Teachers can also find lessons plans and activities for use in the classroom, while parents can find background information on cyber-threats. It also lists interactive games that teach online safety for kids and guidelines for parents on keeping children safe.

Hawaii State Department of Education

The Department of Education aims to improve school infrastructures and enhance community involvement regarding all public K-12 education. Its website provides online safety information, specifically mentioning cyberbullying, sexting and online sexual predation. The website also hosts acceptable online use guidelines and emphasizes digital citizenship. Select schools have specialized learning centers focused on technology, media arts and communications.

Hawaii Virtual Learning Network

The Virtual Learning Network leads the creation of expanded learning programs, educational resources, multimedia programs and other services that use 21st century skills and technologies. This includes establishing a task force to review state education policies with regard to online learning, making online curriculum information accessible to parents and students, developing an online training program for educational staff, standardizing the credit granting process for online courses, and supporting teachers who teach online courses. It is a partner of the Department of Education’s E-School.

Joyful Heart Foundation

This nonprofit was founded in Honolulu in 2004 and has since expanded to New York and Los Angeles. The organization provides services for survivors of sexual assault and child abuse, and promotes advocacy, healing and education on these topics, as well as internet safety guidelines.

Ohana Komputer

This nonprofit provides computer literacy classes to disadvantaged children, teens and adults in Hawaii. It has opened computer labs and worked with schools to create programs for students.

State of Hawaii Department of the Attorney General

The Department of the Attorney General has dedicated criminal justice and public safety divisions, and is responsible for the formation of the Hawaii Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force and HITeC, the Hawaii Internet and Technology Crimes Unit. The website also hosts the state sex offender registry.

The Children’s Advocacy Project of Hawaii (CAP4Kids)

This website lists resources and services for parents regarding child abuse, domestic violence, education and safety.

The Kukui Center

The center provides services for vulnerable, abused and disadvantaged children and families in locations throughout the community.

The Sex Abuse Treatment Center

This statewide center provides treatment services for sexual assault survivors, prevention programs, and promotes awareness, education and public policy to this end. Its website contains information specifically for teens and regarding child sexual abuse by a household member, grooming tactics, online risks, cyberbullying, sexting and signs of abuse. The center also has a child sexual abuse prevention toolkit.

The Impact On Student Achievement When A Teacher Uses Digitally Developed Educative Curriculum Materials (2015)

J. Olson, M. Olson, S. Capen, F. Zenigami

This paper discusses the effects on student achievement when teachers implement a digital curriculum.

Internet Safety: A Core Feature of a 1-to-1 Device Program in Hawai‘i (2015)

T.T. Nguyen, M. Yap

This study found that internet safety programming as part of a one-to-one computing program in Hawaii was well-recieved by schools.

Sexual Assault Victims in Honolulu: A 2001 – 2010 Statistical Profile (2012)

D. Nelson, E. Yanagida, C. Plummer

The report analyzes data from survivors of recent and childhood sexual assault who accessed services throught the Sex Abuse Treatment Center.

Hawaii: A Pacific Crossroads for Distance Education (2011)

M. Iding, M.E. Crosby

In this paper, the authors provide a history of the leading role that the University of Hawaii has taken in distance education, from the 1960’s development of the ALOHA Network, to 1970’s computer programming instruction via teletype dial-up to a time-sharing computer.

The Impact of Cyberbullying on Substance Use and Mental Health in a Multiethnic Sample (2011)

D. Goebert, I. Else, C. Matsu, J. Chung-Do, J.Y. Chang

This study investigates the relationship between cyberbullying and mental health problems among a multiethnic sample of high school students in Hawaii.

Student, Educator, and Parent Perceptions of Cyberbullying in Three Hawai`i Middle Schools (2009)

L.K. Mark

This study examined the phenomenon of cyberbullying in three Hawaii middle schools.

Hawaii Broadband Task Force Final Report (2008)

M.M. Higa

The report evaluates the activities of the Hawaii Broadband Task Force established in 2007.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent in Hawaii is 16 years old.

Unless otherwise specified, felonies in the state of Hawaii are sentenced as follows:

  • Class A felony: indeterminate term of imprisonment for 20 years.
  • Class B felony: indeterminate term of up to 10 years’ imprisonment.
  • Class C felony: indeterminate term of up to five years’ imprisonment.

For sexual offenses that constitute a felony under chapter 707 committed against a child under the age of eight, the following sentences will apply:

  • Class A felony: indeterminate life term of imprisonment.
  • Class B felony: indeterminate 20 year term of imprisonment.
  • Class C felony: indeterminate 10 year term of imprisonment.

Misdemeanors are punished by imprisonment for up to one year, or 30 days in case of a petty misdemeanor.

  • Hawaii Revised Statute (HRS) §707-726. Custodial Interference in the First Degree. Defines the offense as knowingly taking, enticing or concealing a minor under the age of 11 years old from his/her lawful guardian. The offense is a class C felony.
  • HRS §707-727. Custodial Interference in the Second Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she intentionally or knowingly takes, entices, conceals or detains a minor knowing he/she has no right to do so. This is a misdemeanor if the minor is enticed, concealed, taken or detained within the state. If any of these actions occur outside of the state it is a class C felony.
  • HRS §707-732. Sexual Assault in the Third Degree. States that anyone who knowingly subjects another person under 14 years old to sexual contact, or knowingly engages in sexual contact with a person who is 14 or 15 years old where the offender is not less than five years older. An offense under this section is a class C felony.
  • HRS §707-733.6. Continuous Sexual Assault of a Minor Under the Age of 14 Years. A person commits this offense if they either reside in the same home as a minor under 14 years old or has recurring access to the minor, and engages in three or more acts of sexual penetration or sexual contact with the minor while the minor is under 14 years old. A defendant may be charged only with one count under this section unless more than one victim is involved. This crime is a class A felony.
  • HRS §707-750. Promoting Child Abuse in the First Degree. Defines the offense as producing or participating in the preparation of child pornography or pornographic material that uses or employs a minor (under the age of 18) engaging in or assisting others to engage in sexual conduct. It is also an offense to engage in a pornographic performance that uses or employs a minor. Child pornography is defined as a pornographic visual representation of sexual conduct of a minor, including any photograph, film, video, picture, or computer or computer-generated image or picture. The offense is a class A felony.
  • HRS §707-751. Promoting Child Abuse in the Second Degree. Defines the offense as disseminating or reproducing child pornography with intent to disseminate. It also includes possessing 30 or more child pornography images. This includes material stored on a computer disk. The offense is deemed to be a class B felony.
  • HRS §707-752. Promoting Child Abuse in the Third Degree. Defines the offense as possessing child pornography; any book, magazine, film, electronically stored data, computer disk or other material that contains an image of child pornography; any pornographic material that uses a minor. The offense is deemed to be a class C felony.
  • HRS §707-753. Affirmative Defense to Promoting Child Abuse. States that possession of less than three images of child pornography, and taking reasonable steps to destroy each image or reporting the incident to the police is a defense to the charge of promoting child abuse in the third degree.
  • HRS §707-756. Electronic Enticement of a Child in the First Degree. Defines the offense as intentionally communicating with a minor under the age of 18 via a computer or other electronic device, agreeing to meet the minor for the purposes of committing a class A felony or other prohibited act as defined in section 846E-1, and actually travelling to the agreed meeting place at the agreed time. Section 846E-1 covers crimes against minors and sexual offenses. The offense is deemed to be a class B felony and offenders are liable to an indeterminate term of imprisonment.
  • HRS §707-757. Electronic Enticement of a Child in the Second Degree. Defines the offense as intentionally communicating with a minor under the age of 18 via a computer or other electronic device, agreeing to meet the minor for the purposes of committing a felony, and actually travelling to the agreed meeting place at the agreed time. This is deemed to be a class C felony, punishable by minimum prison term of one year.
  • HRS §707-759. Indecent Electronic Display to a Child. States that anyone who masturbates or exposes his/her genitals in a lewd and lascivious manner live over a computer online service, Internet service or local bulletin board service to a minor under the age of 18 is guilty of a misdemeanor.
  • HRS §708-892. Computer Damage in the First Degree. Defines this offense as intentionally causing or attempting to cause damage to a computer, computer system, or computer network that manages or controls any critical infrastructure when the damage results in the substantial impairment of the computer’s operation or the infrastructure controlled by the computer. This is a class A felony.
  • HRS §708-892.5. Computer Damage in the Second Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly causes the transmission of a program, information, code or command and thereby causes unauthorized damage to a computer, computer network or computer system. It is also an offense to intentionally access a computer, computer system or computer network without authorization and knowingly causing damage. This is a class B felony.
  • HRS §708-892.6. Computer Damage in the Third Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly accesses a computer, computer system or computer network without authorization and thereby recklessly causes damage. This is a class C felony.
  • HRS §708-893. Use of a Computer in the Commission of a Separate Crime. Defines the offense as (among other criteria) using a computer to commit the offenses of promoting child abuse in the second degree or promoting pornography for minors. It also includes using a computer to identify, solicit, coerce, entice, harass, contact, annoy or alarm a victim of another offense. Use of a computer in the commission of a separate crime is an offense one class or grade greater than the offense facilitated.
  • HRS §711-1106. Harassment.This section states that anyone who, with intent to annoy, harass or alarm another person, repeatedly makes any form of electronic communication, including email, without purpose of legitimate communication, is guilty of this crime. This is a petty misdemeanor.
  • HRS §711-1106.5. Harassment by Stalking. A person commits this crime if he/she, with intent to harass, annoy or alarm another person, or in reckless disregard of the risk thereof, that person engages in conduct including the pursuit, surveillance or nonconsensual contact upon the other person on more than one occasion without legitimate purpose. Nonconsensual contact includes electronic communication. This is a misdemeanor, and a person convicted may be required to undergo a counseling program.
  • HRS §711-1106.6. Harassment by Impersonation. A person commits this offense if he/she poses as another person, without authorization, and makes or causes to be made a transmission of that person’s personal information by electronic, among other, means with the intent to annoy, alarm or harass any person. This is a misdemeanor offense.
  • HRS §711-1110.9. Violation of Privacy in the First Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she intentionally or knowingly installs and/or uses, in a private place, a device for observing, recording, amplifying or broadcasting a person in a state of undress or sexual activity without the observed person’s consent. Where a person knowingly discloses an image or video of another identifiable person in the nude or engaging in sexual conduct without the depicted person’s consent and with intent to harm the depicted person’s health, safety, business, or reputation, among other interests, the crime is also committed. This is a class C felony. The court may order the destruction of any recording made in violation of this section.
  • HRS §711-1111. Violation of Privacy in the Second Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she trespasses on property for his/her own sexual gratification; peers into a dwelling for the purpose of spying on another person for a lewd or unlawful purpose; installs or uses a device in a private place to record, amplify or broadcast a person in a state of undress or sexual activity without his/her permission; covertly records or broadcasts an image of another person’s intimate area underneath clothing when that person is in a public place and does not consent; nonconsensually intercepts a message or photographic image by electronic means or other means of communicating privately; nonconsensually divulges the contents of a message or photographic image by electronic or other means when the accused knows the message was unlawfully intercepted; or knowingly possesses material created in violation of section 711-1110.9. Any such offense is a misdemeanor. The court may order the destruction of any recording made in violation of this section.
  • HRS §712-1202. Promoting Prostitution in the First Degree. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly advances or profits from prostitution of a person under 18 years old, among other conditions. This is a class A felony.
  • HRS §712-1209. Solicitation of Prostitution Near Schools or Public Parks. A person commits this offense if, within 750 feet of a school or public park, the person offers or agrees to pay a fee to another person to engage in sexual conduct. This is a misdemeanor offense.
  • HRS §712-1209.1. Solicitation of a Minor for Prostitution. A person 18 or older commits this crime if the person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly offers or agrees to pay a fee to a minor or to a member of a police department, a sheriff, or a law enforcement officer who represents that person’s self as a minor to engage in sexual conduct. This is a class C felony, punishable by a fine of at least $5,000.
  • HRS §712-1215. Promoting Pornography for Minors. Defines the offense as disseminating pornographic material to a minor under the age of 16. Parents, guardians, siblings and library staff acting in the capacity of their work are specifically excluded under this offense. Promoting pornography to minors is a class C felony.
  • HRS §712-1215.5. Promoting Minor-Produced Sexual Images in the First Degree. A person 18 years old or older commits this offense if the person intentionally or knowingly commands, requests or encourages a minor to use a computer, cell phone or any other device to transmit to any person a nude photograph or video of a minor. For the purposes of this section, a minor is anyone under 18 years old. This offense is a misdemeanor.
  • HRS §712-1215.6. Promoting Minor-Produced Sexual Images in the Second Degree. A minor commits this offense if he/she knowingly uses a computer, cell phone or similar device to transmit or distribute a nude photograph or video of a minor or of him/herself to another person; or intentionally or knowingly commands, requests or encourages another minor to do so. A person of any age commits this offense if the person knowingly possesses a nude photograph or video of a minor transmitted or distributed in violation of the previous clauses. It is a defense that the person took reasonable steps to destroy or eliminate the material. In this section, a minor is anyone under 18 years old. This crime is a petty misdemeanor.
  • HRS §712-1218. Failure to Maintain Age Verification Records of Sexual Performers. A person commits this offense if he/she fails to maintain age verification records of sexual performers when the person knowingly produces any pornographic material that contains one or more pornographic visual depiction of sexual conduct. This also includes knowingly making or causing to be made a false entry into the age verification records, or knowingly failing to verify the age of a sexual performer. This is a class C felony.
  • HRS §712-1218.5. Failure to Maintain Age Verification Records of Sexually Exploited Individuals. A person commits this offense if he/she fails to maintain age verification records of sexually exploited individuals if, with the intent to profit therefrom, the person knowingly provides sexually exploited individuals to patrons or customers of a public establishment or provides sexually exploited individuals to a private club or event, and the person: (a) knowingly fails to create and maintain age verification records for each sexually exploited individual; (b) knowingly makes or causes to be made any false entry into the age verification records of sexually exploited individuals required by this section; or (c) knowingly fails to produce the age verification records of sexually exploited individuals required by this section upon request by a law enforcement officer for the purpose of verifying the age of a sexually exploited individual. This is a class C felony.
  • HRS §846E. Registration of Sex Offenders and Other Covered Offenders and Public Access to Registration Information. This section establishes registration requirements for sex offenders in Hawaii. An offender who fails to follow the registration protocol is guilty of a class C felony.