Colorado

Population

5,456,574

Population 0‑18

23.3%

Internet Users

81.2%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2005 – The state’s school safety law was updated to include education and procedures for Internet safety. Each school district was encouraged to provide an age-appropriate Internet safety curriculum for K-12 students by the 2005-2006 school year. Districts were advised to incorporate the Internet safety topics into regular subjects rather than in a separate class, and to cover the following topics: predator identification, personal safety when interacting with others online, cyberbullying, online literacy, and online privacy, among others. To develop the curricula, schools were to utilize resources made available through nonprofit Internet safety foundations endorsed by the federal government, and also work closely with the local law enforcement agencies.

2008 – The Colorado School Safety Resource Center was created with the passage of C.R.S. 24-33.5-1801. The center was designed to provide free consultations, resources, training and technical assistance to foster safe learning environments in schools and crisis prevention. It supports schools and local agencies in preventing, preparing for, responding to and recovering from emergencies and crises.

2011 – The Act “Concerning Measures to Reduce the Frequency of Bullying in Schools” was signed into law. The law prohibits bullying, which is defined as any written or verbal expression, or physical or electronic act or gesture intended to coerce, intimidate, or cause any physical, mental, or emotional harm to any student.

2012 – A law was passed requiring colleges and universities to provide a statement to the campus community identifying the name and location at which members of the community can find law enforcement information regarding registered sex offenders.

2013 – By the end of this year, each school district was required to adopt and implement an internet safety policy for minors. The same applied to the state’s public libraries.

2014 – The governor signed a student data collection privacy protection law. The law defines different types of applicable student data and requires the state board of education to make publicly available which types of student data are currently collected. It must also make public procedures that comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and restrict access to personally identifiable information, among other requirements.

2015 – A measure encouraging schools to develop child sexual abuse and assault prevention plans for K-12 students was added to the school safety law. The curricula could address skills to recognize child sexual abuse and assault, unwanted forms of touching and contact, and behaviors offenders use to groom victims. Schools could also teach strategies to promote disclosure, reduce self-blame and mobilize bystanders. School districts were encouraged to include a professional development component for school personnel and education for parents.

The same year, the governor also passed a law regarding harassment through electronic media. This law changed the existing harassment statute to cover situations of harassment through an interactive electronic medium. Additionally, a new campus sexual assault law created new requirements for colleges and universities in the state concerning treatment and care of sexual assault victims.

Colorado Children's Campaign

This nonpartisan nonprofit advocates for data-driven public policies to improve children’s well-being. It conducts and reports research, and has organized a statewide network of advocates.

Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault

This membership organization works to promote safety, justice and healing for survivors, while working to eliminate sexual violence. It provides resources for survivors and lobbies for public policy changes.

Colorado Department of Education

The state education department provides resources on topics like school safety, bullying prevention and online learning on its website. The state also offers online schools and programs.

Colorado Division of Criminal Justice, Department of Public Safety

This department’s website offers information on the state’s response to sexual assault and human trafficking cases, as well as explanations of victims’ rights and compensation.

Colorado Governor's Office of Information Security

This office aims to provide leadership in the development, delivery and maintenance of information security programs by protecting the state’s information assets.

Colorado Human Trafficking Council

Created in 2014 by the Colorado House of Representatives, the council aims to bring together leadership across levels of government and the community to combat human trafficking. The council will work toward improving services for survivors of human trafficking, assist in prosecution of traffickers and enhance prevention efforts in Colorado.

Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance

A statewide coalition of nonprofits, COVA is committed to securing fairness and healing for victims of crimes, as well as their families and communities.

Colorado School Safety Resource Center

Established in 2008, the CSSRC has in person and online training programs for school administrators, staff and security personnel on all forms of school safety. The center has a youth advisory council and a program called Businesses Assisting Schools in Communities Prepare, which focuses on building safety-preparedness partnerships between businesses and schools.

Colorado Youth Matter

This nonprofit uses training, research, advocacy, education and partnerships to advance youth sexual health. Its goal is to help young people throughout the state make informed decisions about sexual health.

Human Trafficking Center

This nonprofit research and advocacy organization works to promote understanding of human trafficking – its causes, characteristics and possible solutions. The Human Trafficking Index is the main research project of the center, with an international scope. The center is part of the University of Denver.

iEmpathize

Focused on eradicating child exploitation, this human rights nonprofit works on prevention, intervention and advocacy efforts.

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

This group focuses on conducting research, training professionals and first responders and educating the public with the goal of ending human trafficking. One of its initiatives is The Colorado Project to Comprehensively Combat Human Trafficking, which aims to develop sustainable plans to end human trafficking with the input of people working on the ground.

Safe2Tell

This Colorado organization provides a place to report threatening behaviors safely and anonymously. It also gives advice and support to young people on a variety of topics, including cyberbullying and Internet safety. The organization is funded by the state Attorney General’s Office.

Sex Offenders Management Board

The board develops standards and guidelines for evaluation, treatment and supervision of sex offenders. It works toward systematic management and treatment of past offenders with the goal of improving safety and protecting citizens.

The Kempe Foundation

This organization engages in clinical care, advocacy, research and education to prevent child abuse and neglect, and treat its victims. It works in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

National Human Trafficking Resource Center: Colorado State Report (2015)

National Human Trafficking Resource Center

This report compiles 2014 data on human trafficking, including the number of reports made to NHTRC and demographic data on the state's trafficking victims.

Lifetime Supervision of Sex Offenders: Annual Report (2015)

Office of Planning and Analysis Colorado Department of Corrections

This report focuses on lifetime supervision of sex offenders in Colorado and associated costs.

Colorado Statewide Data Report (2013)

The Colorado Project to Comprehensively Combat Human Trafficking Project Team

The report evaluates efforts to combat human trafficking in Colorado and discusses potential further solutions.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

Since 1992, the penalties for sex offenders have been increased dramatically. The penalty for the Class 4 felony offense of sexual assault used to be between two and six years imprisonment but now, depending on the perceived severity of the crime, the sentence can be life imprisonment. Convicted sex offenders must register with the state for life, re-registering every 90 days and parole can last indefinitely depending on the level of risk determined by the Colorado Sex Offender Management Board.

Unless otherwise specified, felonies in the state of Colorado are sentenced as follows:

  • Class 1 felony: life imprisonment or death
  • Class 2 felony: presumptive range of between eight and 24 years’ imprisonment; extraordinary range of between four and 48 years’ imprisonment; fine of $5,000 - $1 million.
  • Class 3 felony: presumptive range of between four and 12 years’ imprisonment; extraordinary range of between two and 24 years’ imprisonment; extraordinary risk crimes carry a sentence of between four and 16 years’ imprisonment; fine of $3,000 - $750,000.
  • Class 4 felony: presumptive range of between two and six years’ imprisonment; extraordinary range of between one and 12 years’ imprisonment; extraordinary risk crimes carry a sentence of between two and eight years’ imprisonment; fine of $2,000 - $500,000.
  • Class 5 felony: presumptive range of between one and three years’ imprisonment; extraordinary range of between six months and six years’ imprisonment; extraordinary risk crimes carry a sentence of between one and four years’ imprisonment; fine of $1,000 - $100,000.
  • Class 6 felony: presumptive range of between one and one and a half years’ imprisonment; extraordinary range of between six months and three years’ imprisonment; extraordinary risk crimes carry a sentence of between one and two years’ imprisonment; fine of $1,000 - $100,000.

Note: Extraordinary risk crimes include first degree sexual assault, second degree sexual assault, third degree sexual assault, sexual assault on a child, and sexual assault on a child by someone in a position of trust.

Unless otherwise specified, misdemeanors in the state of Colorado are sentenced as follows:

  • Class 1 misdemeanor: maximum sentence of 18 months’ imprisonment.*
  • Class 2 misdemeanor: maximum sentence of 12 months’ imprisonment.
  • Class 3 misdemeanor: maximum sentence of six months’ imprisonment.

*Extraordinary risk crimes such as Unlawful Sexual Contact increase the severity of the sentence.

  • Colorado Revised Statutes (C.R.S.) 16-22. Colorado Sex Offender Registration Act. Requires certain categories of convicted sex offenders to register their details and address with the nearest law enforcement agency to their place of residence. Sexually violent predators and adults convicted of the most serious sex crimes are required to register for life in Colorado with no possibility to discontinue their registration requirement. Registration is usually renewed annually, except in the case of violent sex offenders who can be required to re-register every 90 days. Offenders are required to register their address, date of birth, place of employment, email addresses, and chat and instant messaging details.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-305. Enticement of a Child. States that anyone who invites or persuades a child under the age of 15 years to enter any building, room or vehicle in order to commit sexual assault or unlawful sexual contact is guilty of a Class 4 felony. Where the offender has been convicted of a previous conviction of enticement of a child, sexual assault on a child or for conspiracy to commit either offense, in which case it is deemed to be a Class 3 felony. Should bodily injury be caused to the child, it also qualifies as a Class 3 felony. Class 3 and 4 felonies carry a sentence of up to life imprisonment.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-306. Internet Luring of a Child. This section states that anyone who, being more than four years older than the victim, communicates with a child under the age of 15 over a computer, computer network, telephone or data network, or by a text message or instant message, describing sexually explicit conduct and attempting to persuade or invite the child to meet in person, is guilty of an offense. With effective from July 2009 the section was amended to state that it is not a defense that a meeting did not occur. The offense is deemed to be a Class 5 felony unless it was committed with the intent to meet for the purposes of sexual exploitation, in which case it is deemed to be a Class 4 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-405. Sexual Assault on a Child. Defines the offense as subjecting a child under the age of 15 to sexual contact, when the offender is at least four years older than the victim. This is deemed to be a Class 4 felony. A Class 3 felony charge applies if any of the following conditions are met: (1) the actor uses force against the victim to accomplish or facilitate sexual contact; (2) the actor threatens imminent death, serious bodily injury, extreme pain or kidnapping against the victim or another person; (3) the actor threatens retaliation; or (4) the actor commits the offense as part of a pattern of sexual abuse. A person convicted on or after July 1, 2013 has no right to notification, responsibilities, inheritance or notification of adoption for a child conceived as a result of the offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-405.3 Sexual Assault on a Child by One in a Position of Trust. States that anyone in a position of trust over a victim who subjects a child under the age of 18 to a sexual offense guilty of an offense. If the victim is under 15 years of age or there is a pattern of abuse the offense is deemed to be a Class 3 felony. If the victim is between 15 and 18 years of age and there is no pattern of abuse it is deemed to be a Class 4 felony. A person convicted on or after July 1, 2013 has no right to notification, responsibilities, inheritance or notification of adoption for a child conceived as a result of the offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-405.4. Internet Sexual Exploitation of a Child. This section states that anyone who knowingly invites, entice or importunes through communication via a computer, computer network, telephone or data network, or by a text message or instant message a child under the age of 15 and at least four years younger than the offender to commit one of the following is guilty of an offense: to expose or touch their intimate parts, or to observe the offender touching his/her intimate parts. The offense is deemed to be a Class 4 felony. This section became effective in July 2009.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-405.6. Invasion of Privacy for Sexual Gratification. States that anyone who observes or photographs another person’s intimate parts without consent, in a situation where the victim has reasonable expectations of privacy, for the offender’s own sexual gratification is guilty of an offense. This is deemed to be a Class 1 misdemeanor and an extraordinary risk crime, which increased the maximum penalty to two years’ imprisonment. The offense is reclassified to a Class 6 felony extraordinary risk crime if the offense is committed subsequent to a prior conviction for unlawful sexual behavior (16-22-102), or the victim is under the age of 15 years. The latter does not aggravate the sentence if the offender is less than four years older than the victim.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-501. Human Trafficking and Slavery. States that a person commits an offense if he/she sells, exchanges, barters or leases an adult and receives money or other compensation for the transaction, or receives an adult as a result of such a transaction. This is a Class 3 felony unless the trafficked person is illegally present in the United States, in which case it is a Class 2 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-502. Trafficking in Children. This section states that anyone who sells, exchanges, barters, or leases a child and receives any money or other consideration or thing of value for the child as a result of such transaction is guilty of a Class 2 felony. Receiving a child as a result of the above described transaction is also an offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-504. Human Trafficking for Sexual Servitude – States that a person who knowingly sells, recruits, harbors, transports, transfers, isolates, entices, provides, receives or obtains another person for the purpose of coercing him/her to engage in commercial sexual activity commits this offense, which is a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-504.2 Human Trafficking of a Minor for Sexual Servitude. States that a person who knowingly sells, recruits, harbors, transports, transfers, isolates, entices, provides, receives or obtains, maintains or makes available a minor for commercial sexual activity commits this offense. This is a Class 2 felony. It is not a defense that the minor consented to any of the above actions or that the defendant did not know the minor’s age or believed them to be 18 or older. A person need not receive proceeds of the commercial sexual activity to commit this offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-3-602. Stalking – Penalty – Definitions. States that a person is guilty of stalking if they make a credible threat to another person and then repeatedly surveils, follows, approaches, contacts or otherwise makes communication with that person or a member of his/her family. The definition of stalking also includes any above action that causes the recipient of the communication serious emotional distress. Stalking is a Class 5 felony for a first offense and a Class 4 felony for any subsequent offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-5.5-102. Computer Crime. Describes various forms of computer crime, such a unauthorized access, damaging or interrupting the transmission of a computer network, fraudulent access to a computer network, or access with intent to commit theft.
  • **C.R.S. 18-6-403. Sexual Exploitation of a Child. States that a child below the age of 18 years is incapable of giving informed consent to sexual acts. Defines, among other things, “sexually exploitative material” as any photograph, motion picture, video, print or other electronically, mechanically or digitally reproduced visual material that depicts a child engaged in, participating in, observing, or being used for explicit sexual conduct. The section states that anyone who causes, induces, entices, or permits a child under the age of 18 years to engage in, or be used for, any explicit sexual conduct for the making of sexually exploitative material is guilty of the sexual exploitation of a child. It is also an offense to prepare, arrange for, produce, promote, make, sell, finance, advertise, deal in, offer, exhibit, distribute or publish, including through digital or electronic means, any such material, or possess such material with intent to do any of the above. The definition of sexual exploitation of a child also covers to cause, entice, permit or induce a child to engage in or be used for sexual conduct for the purpose of producing a performance. Sexual exploitation of a child is a Class 3 felony. The section also states that possessing or controlling any sexually exploitative material for any purpose is a Class 5 felony offense; this is aggravated to a Class 4 felony if it is a subsequent offense or the offender possesses more than 20 different items qualifying as sexually exploitative material.
  • C.R.S. 18-6-404. Procurement of a Child for Sexual Exploitation. States that anyone who transports, provides, gives or makes available to another a child for the purpose of sexual exploitation is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-6-701. Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor. States that anyone who induces, encourages or aids a child under the age of 18 to violate any law is guilty of a Class 4 felony offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-102. Obscenity. This section states that anyone who wholesale promotes any obscene material, or possesses with intent to do so, to a minor is guilty of a Class 6 felony. The section also defines promotion of obscenity to a minor, which is also a Class 6 felony. If the obscenity is promoted to someone 18 or older, it is either a Class 1 or 2 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-107. Posting a Private Image for Harassment. States that a person who is 18 or older commits this offense if he/she posts or distributes through social media or any website a photograph, video or other image displaying the private intimate parts of an identifiable or identified person who is 18 or older, with the intent to harass the depicted person and inflict serious emotional distress. Such an act is done without the depicted person’s consent, when the actor knew or should have known the depicted person had a reasonable expectation the image would remain private, and the conduct results in serious emotional distress for the depicted person. Posting a private image for harassment is a Class 1 misdemeanor and can carry a fine of up to $10,000 in addition to any other sentence the court imposes. The victim can also sue for civil damages.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-108. Posting a Private Image for Pecuniary Gain. States that a person who is 18 or older commits this offense if he/she posts or distributes through social media or any website a photograph, video or other image displaying the private intimate parts of an identifiable or identified person who is 18 or older, with the intent to obtain a pecuniary benefit from any person as a result of the posting, viewing or removal of the image, and when the actor has not contained the depicted person’s consent or the actor should have known the depicted person had a reasonable expectation that the image would remain private. Such an offense is a Class 1 misdemeanor and can carry a fine of up to $10,000 in addition to any other sentence the court imposes. The victim can also sue for civil damages.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-201. Prostitution Prohibited. States that any person who performs or offers or agrees to perform any act of sexual intercourse, fellatio, cunnilingus, masturbation, or anal intercourse with any person not his spouse in exchange for money or other thing of value commits prostitution. Such an offense is a Class 3 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-202. Soliciting for Prostitution. States that a person commits this offense if he/she solicits another for prostitution, arranges or offers to arrange a meeting of persons for the purpose of prostitution, or directs another to a place for the purpose of prostitution. This is a Class 3 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-203. Pandering. This section states that any person who does any of the following actions for money commits this offense: (a) inducing a person by menacing or criminal intimidation to commit prostitution, or (b) knowingly arranging or offering to arrange a situation in which someone may practice prostitution. Pandering under paragraph (a) is a Class 5 felony; pandering under paragraph (b) is a Class 3 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-204. Keeping a Place of Prostitution. States that any person who exercises control over the use of a place which offers seclusion or shelter for prostitution, and performs one or more of the following commits this offense: knowingly grants the use of such a place for prostitution or permits the continued use of such place for prostitution after becoming aware it was being used for prostitution. Such an offense is a Class 2 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-205. Patronizing a Prostitute. States that engaging in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual conduct with a prostitute, or entering and remaining in a place of prostitution with intent to engage in such an act with someone who is not his/her spouse is an offense. This is a Class 1 petty offense, except if the person has committed two or more prior convictions of a violation of this section, in which case it is a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-206. Pimping. States that any person who knowingly lives on or is supported or maintained in whole or in part by money or other thing of value earned, received, procured, or realized by any other person through prostitution commits pimping. This is a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-207. Prostitute Making Display. States that any person who by word, gesture, or action endeavors to further the practice of prostitution in any public place or within public view commits a Class 1 petty offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-301. Public Indecency. States that anyone who commits any of the following in a public place is guilty of public indecency, a Class 1 petty offense: sexual intercourse; lewd exposure of intimate parts (except genitals) with intent to arouse or satisfy the sexual desire of any person; lewd fondling or caress of another person’s body; exposure of genitals with intent to cause alarm or affront.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-302. Indecent Exposure. Defines the offense as exposing his/her genitals to another person in circumstances where such behavior is likely to cause alarm or affront with intent to arouse or satisfy the sexual desire of any person. Masturbating in the view of any person causing affront or alarm is also covered by the definition. This is a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-402. Soliciting for Child Prostitution. Defines the offense as soliciting another, arranging a meeting of persons, or directing another person to a place for the purpose of prostitution by a child. This is a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-403. Pandering of a Child. States that anyone who, for financial gain or other valuable thing, induces a child by menace or criminal intimidation to commit prostitution, is guilty of a Class 2 felony. Arranging a situation in which a child might practice prostitution, is a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-403.5. Procurement of a Child. This section states that anyone who intentionally gives, provides, transports, or makes available, or who offers to do so, to another person a child for the purpose of prostitution of the child is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-404. Keeping a Place of Child Prostitution. States that anyone who has or controls the use of a place which offers seclusion or shelter for the practice of prostitution commits this offense if he/she knowingly grants use of said place for prostitution of or by a child, or permits the continued use of said place for prostitution of or by a child after becoming aware of facts of such prostitution. This offense is a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-405. Pimping of a Child. States that anyone who knowingly lives, wholly or in part, on the earnings of a child realized through prostitution is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-405.5. Inducement of Child Prostitution. States that anyone who, by word or action, induces a child to engage in an act of prostitution is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-406. Patronizing a Prostituted Child. This section states that anyone who engages in an act of prostitution with a child, or enters or remains in a place of prostitution with intent to engage in an act of child prostitution is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-502. Unlawful Acts. States, among other things, that it is unlawful for any person to sell or loan for money to a child under the age of 18 any picture, drawing, photograph, sculpture, film, or similar visual representation or image of a person or portion of the human body depicting sexually explicit nudity, sexual conduct, or sadomasochistic abuse and which, taken as a whole, is harmful to children. It is also unlawful to sell or loan any book, pamphlet, magazine, printed matter or sound recording containing descriptions or narrative accounts of the above. This is deemed to be a Class 2 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-7-801. Criminal Invasion of Privacy. Constitutes that anyone who knowingly observes or photographs another person’s intimate parts without consent in a situation where that person can reasonably expect privacy is guilty of a Class 2 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-9-111. Harassment. Defines harassment and includes in the definition the initiation of contact by telephone, telephone network, data network, text message, instant message, computer, computer network, computer system, or other interactive electronic medium in a manner intended to harass or threaten bodily injury or property damage. It is also classed as harassment to make any comment, request, suggestion, or proposal by telephone, computer, computer network, computer system, or other interactive electronic medium that is obscene. Such communication can be direct or indirect, and can be done anonymously or otherwise. Harassment is deemed to be a Class 3 misdemeanor. Where the reason for the harassment is either the victim’s race, color, religion, ancestry or national origin, it is deemed to be a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • C.R.S. 18-21. Sex Offender Surcharge. Levies a fine on convicted sex offenders, the amount of which is determined by the level of the offense of which they are convicted. The aim of this charge is to reduce the burden on the taxpayer and to contribute to the cost of evaluating, identifying, treating and continued monitoring of offenders. Surcharges range from $150 for a Class 3 misdemeanor to $3,000 for a Class 2 felony offense.
  • C.R.S. 18-24. Crimes Against Children Surcharge. Defines crimes against children as, among other things, Internet luring of a child (18-3-306), invasion of privacy for sexual gratification (18-3-405.6) when the victim is a child, procurement of a child for sexual exploitation (18-6-404), pimping of a child (18-7-405), Internet sexual exploitation of a child (18-3-405.4), human trafficking of a minor for involuntary servitude (18-3-503), and others. Surcharges range from $75 for a Class 3 misdemeanor to $1,500 for a Class 2 felony offense.
  • C.R.S. 22-32-109.1. Board of Education – Specific Powers and Duties – Safe Schools. States, among other things, that each school district board shall adopt a bullying prevention and education policy, which has to, at its minimum, include a biennial survey of students’ impressions of the severity of bullying in their schools. The policy shall also include disciplinary consequences for bullies. The definition of bullying explicitly includes electronic acts. The section encourages each school district to provide an age-appropriate Internet safety curriculum for K-12 students, as well as emergency communications. It suggests including the following subjects in the curriculum: predator identification, personal safety, cyberbullying, online literacy and online privacy. It is advised that Internet safety topics are incorporated into regular subjects rather than in a separate class. To develop the curricula, schools should utilize resources made available through nonprofit Internet safety foundations endorsed by the federal government, and also work closely with the local law enforcement agencies. Each school district shall also adopt and implement a safe school plan, following the state’s requirements. Each district must also report conduct and discipline code violations. Specifically, the number of acts of sexual violence on school property or at school-sponsored events must be reported, but without any personally identifiable information.
  • C.R.S. 22-87-101 to 107. Children’s Internet Protection Act. Requires public schools to implement Internet safety policies and filtering systems to protect children from harmful content.
  • C.R.S. 24-90-603. Adoption and Enforcement of Policy of Internet Safety for Minors Including Technology Protection Measures – Public Libraries. Requires the governing body of each public library to have an Internet safety policy and filtering system in place to protect minors from harmful content.