Arkansas

Population

2,978,204

Population 0‑18

23.8%

Internet Users

70.1%

Home Internet Subscribers

74.8%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2001 – A law on the use of computers in schools required each school district to implement a computer policy preventing users from accessing material harmful to minors by August 2001. The policy must contain punishments for student violations, with harsher penalties for repeat offenders.

Also in 2001, a law was passed requiring that each library implements a policy preventing minors from accessing harmful material online using public access computers, and suspends access for minors who violate the policy. Public access computers include those connected to the Internet in public schools and libraries.

2003 – Arkansas passed a law to institute a library media services program throughout the state. Libraries are to hire information specialists to assist in the use of technology for educational purposes and help incorporate technology into school curricula.

2007 – Initiated by the Governor, the eDATA Project assessed the technology resources in public schools, intending to utilize the results to formulate guidelines ensuring a safe Internet experience for students. The report found that only 98 out of a total of 256 school districts in the state provide annual Internet safety classes to students. No information could be found regarding the progress of the planned guidelines at the present time.

The same year, the state passed a law requiring every public school to have an anti-bullying policy. Policies are to include cyberbullying, and communications do not have to be sent from school property to be considered a violation. Bullying of a public school student is prohibited.

Also in 2007, the governor announced an education initiative reviewing the technology resources currently present in schools, identifying areas for improvement and monitoring how resources are used. Within the framework of the eDATA Project, the Arkansas Department of Education and the Department of Information Services are to formulate a timeline to ensure that children have “safe access to the online world.”

2013 – Arkansas passed a law governing the use of personal electronic devices in schools. School districts may establish student discipline policies and exemptions on the possession and use of personal electronic devices by students on school property, at school-sponsored functions and at after-school activities. The policy may allow or restrict possession or use of a personal electronic device, allow the use of such devices for instruction purposes at the discretion of teachers and administrators, limit the times or locations in which such devices may be used, and allow or prohibit the use of recording capabilities in schools, among other possible rules.

2014 – The state published its Strategic Plan for Information Technology to run from 2015 to 2017. This includes goals to improve education, expand workforce training and promote digital inclusion. Overall, the plan strives to improve citizen access to technology and maximize its potential.

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

This nonprofit focuses on education and child welfare, among other issues. Its Kids Count Coalition lobbies the state government to work in the interest of children and families.

Arkansas Attorney General

The Attorney General’s office provides online advice on cyber safety, social media safety, cyberbullying and online predation, as well as activities to help educate children and parents. Its Cyber Crimes Unit investigates online crimes against children, specifically online child pornography.

Arkansas CASA

This organization’s court appointed special advocates speak up on behalf of abused and neglected kids, as well as children in foster care.

Arkansas Crime Intervention Center

This center is tasked with providing law enforcement with technology services, including the sex offender registry database and the missing persons tracking system.

Arkansas Department of Education

The Arkansas Department of Education strives to ensure that all children in the state have access to a quality education by providing educators, administrators and staff with leadership, resources and training. Within the department is the Technology Initiatives & Resources division.

Arkansas Department of Human Services

This department has divisions focused on child care and early childhood education, children and family services, and youth services. Its website includes reporting guidelines for child abuse.

Arkansas Educational Television Network

The website of this public television network offers online learning resources and activities for kids on a wide range of educational subjects. It also has information and resources for teachers and parents.

ArkansasIDEAS – Internet Delivered Education for Arkansas Schools

A partnership between the Arkansas Department of Education and the Arkansas Educational Television Network, ArkansasIDEAS offers web-based professional development courses for teachers in every core subject. It also contains teaching resources on Internet safety.

Arkansas Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force

The Task Force is made up of 42 local police departments and sheriff’s offices, working together to keep children safe and prosecute online offenders, while also educating parents, children and teachers on safe online behavior.

Arkansas Society for Technology in Education

This professional organization for educational technology leaders is a forum for technological innovation and idea sharing to promote effective use of technology in Arkansas schools.

Arkansas State Police

The police department includes a specialized crimes against children division with a hotline for reporting abuse.

Children’s Advocacy Centers of Arkansas

This nonprofit provides services to child victims of abuse and their families at no cost. This includes advocacy, forensic interviews, medical exams and therapy.

Delta Technology Education Center

This center aims to improve the economy in Southeast Arkansas through full access to technology for the public, additional educational opportunities, workforce training and collaboration with public schools.

Women and Children First

This organization provides a hotline, advocacy and case management, and awareness raising on domestic violence issues. Its website provides specific information on teen dating violence and the effects of domestic violence on children.

Report of the Arkansas Task Force for the Prevention of Human Trafficking (2014)

W. Jones, R. Stanford

This is the final report of a task force created to address every aspect of human trafficking in the state, including the forced labor trafficking and sex trafficking of U.S. citizens and foreign nationals.

Criminal Law - Teenage Sexting in Arkansas: How Special Legislation Addressing Sexting Behavior in Minors Can Salvage Arkansas's Teens' Futures (2012)

S.L. Leasure

This paper argues the need for special sexting legislation and what type of legislation would be most beneficial for Arkansas teens.

From LOL to Three Months in Jail: Examining the Validity and Constitutional Boundaries of the Arkansas Cyberbullying Act of 2011 (2012)

S.C. Rose

This paper examines the implementation and effects of the Arkansas Cyberbullying Act of 2011.

Sadness, Suicide, and Bullying in Arkansas: Results from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2011)

K. Kindrick, J. Castro, E. Messias

This study used the 2011 Arkansas Youth Risk Behavior Survey to estimate the prevalence of school bullying and cyberbullying and to measure its association with teen suicidality.

A Dangerous Leap: The Admission of Prior Offenses in Sexual-Assault and Child-Molestation Cases in Arkansas (2009)

G.A. Cossey

This article examines the use of character evidence for those accused of sexual assault and child molestation.

Suspended on Saturday - The Constitutionality of the Cyberbullying Act of 2007 (2009)

L.M. Ward

The paper evaluates Arkansas' 2007 cyberbullying law.

The Role of School Psychologists in the Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention of Cyberbullying (2008)

T. Diamanduros, E. Downs, S.J. Jenkins

This paper argues that, do to the unique aspects of cyberbullying, school psychologists need strategies to guide school communities faced with this threatening behavior.

Sex Offenders in Arkansas: Characteristics of Offenders and Enforcement of Sex Offender Laws (2000)

J.T. Walker, G. Ervin-McLarty

This report describes characteristics of sex offenders and enforcement of sex offender laws in Arkansas.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent in Arkansas is 16 years old.

Unless otherwise specified, felonies in the state of Arkansas are sentenced as follows:

  • Class Y felony: 10 to 40 years’ imprisonment, or life imprisonment.
  • Class A felony: Six to 30 years’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $15,000.
  • Class B felony: Five to 20 years’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $15,000.
  • Class C felony: Three to ten years’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $10,000.
  • Class D felony: Maximum of six years’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $10,000.

Unless otherwise specified, misdemeanors in the state of Arkansas are sentenced as follows:

  • Class A misdemeanor: Maximum of one year’s imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $2,500.
  • Class B misdemeanor: Maximum of 90 days’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $1,000.
  • Class C misdemeanor: Maximum of 30 days’ imprisonment. Fine not to exceed $500.

  • Arkansas Code (A.C.A.) §5-14-103. Rape. States that it is a criminal offense for a person to engage in sexual penetration or deviate sexual penetration with a person without his/her consent, by forcible compulsion or where the victim is under 14 in which case the offender must be more than three years older. This is a Class Y felony. Where it involves a victim under 14, the offense carries a minimum term of 25 years’ imprisonment.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-110. Sexual Indecency With a Child. States that it is unlawful for a person 18 years old or older to solicit a child aged under 15 to engage in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual activity or sexual contact, or to expose their sexual organs to a child of less than 15 with intent to gratify their sexual desire. The latter is not an offense if the offender was less than three years older than the victim. It is also an offense for an adult to cause or coerce a minor under the age of 14 to expose his/her sexual organs or the breast of a female. Sexual indecency with a child is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-124. Sexual Assault in the First Degree. States that where an adult in a position of trust engages in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse with a minor an offense is committed. Where the adult is a teacher, principal, athletic coach or counselor in a K-12 public or private school, and engages in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual activity with a person who is under 21 years old, is enrolled in the school employing the adult, and the adult is in a position of trust or authority over the student, an offense is also committed. This is a Class A felony, but it is a defense to show that the offender was less than three years older than the victim.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-125. Sexual Assault in the Second Degree. This section states that it is a crime to engage in sexual contact with another person without consent, or where the offender is over 18 and the victim is less than 14 years of age. This is a Class B felony offense. Where a teacher engages in sexual contact with a student enrolled in the school system who is under 21 years of age, they also commit a Class B felony. Also covered by this section is where a minor engages in sexual contact with another minor who is less than fourteen and at least three years younger than the offender; this is a Class D felony. It is a defense to a charge for the latter if the victim is less than 12 years of age and the offender is no more than three years older than the victim, or no more than four years older if the victim is aged 12 or above.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-126. Sexual Assault in the Third Degree. Defines, among other things, the offense of a minor engaging in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse with another person who is less than 14 years of age. This is a Class C felony, unless the offender is less than three years older than the victim in which case there is no offense.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-127. Sexual Assault in the Fourth Degree. States that where a person over the age of 20 engages in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual activity with a child under 16 a Class D felony is committed. Where the offender engages in sexual contact with a child under 16 it is considered to be a Class A misdemeanor.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-128. Registered Offender Living Near School, Public Park, Youth Center, or Daycare Prohibited. States that it is unlawful for a registered sex offender to reside within 2,000 feet of a public or private elementary or secondary school, public park, youth center, or daycare facility. This is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-129. Registered Offender Working with Children Prohibited. States that it is unlawful for a registered sex offender to knowingly engage in an occupation or participate in a volunteer position that requires the sex offender to work or interact with a child under 16 years old, or accept work to be performed at a privately owned daycare facility. A violation is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-131. Registered Offender Living Near Victim or Having Contact with Victim Prohibited. States that it is unlawful for a registered sex offender to reside within 2,000 feet of the residence of his/her victim or have direct or indirect contact with his or her victim for the purpose of harassment. Such an offense is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-133. Registered Offender Prohibited from Entering a Water Park Owned or Operated by a Local Government. States that it is unlawful for a registered sex offender to enter a water park operated or owned by a local government. A violation of this section is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-14-134. Registered Offender Prohibited from Entering a Swimming Area or Children’s Playground Contained within an Arkansas State Park. States that it is unlawful for a registered sex offender to enter a swimming area or children’s playground within an Arkansas State Park. A violation of this section is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-16-101. Crime of Video Voyeurism. This section states, among other things, that it is a crime to use any camera, videotape or other image recording device to secretly observe, photograph, film or view another person, without consent, in a private area where they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. This is deemed to be a Class D felony. The section also states that it is a Class B misdemeanor to use a camcorder, photographic camera or other equipment that is concealed or disguised to secretly film, photograph, record, or view by electronic means a person, without consent, in circumstances where they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. It is reclassified as a Class A misdemeanor if the offender posted the recording on the Internet.
  • A.C.A. §5-16-102. Voyeurism. Defines the offense of viewing or looking, for the purposes of sexual arousal, into a place where a person could be expected to be nude, without their consent. This is a Class A misdemeanor, unless the person viewed is under 17 and the person viewing them is in a position of trust, in which case it is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-18-103. Trafficking of Persons. A person violates this section if he/she knowingly: (a) recruits, harbors, transports, obtains, entices, solicits, isolates, provides, or maintains a person knowing that the person will be subjected to involuntary servitude; (b) benefits financially or benefits by receiving anything of value from participation in a venture under the previous clause; (c) subjects a person to involuntary servitude; (d) recruits, entices, solicits, isolates, harbors, transports, provides, maintains, or obtains a minor for commercial sexual activity; or (e) sells or offers to sell travel services that he or she knows includes an activity prohibited under this section. It is no defense to prove that the actor did not know the victim’s age or believed mistakenly that the victim was not a minor. Trafficking of persons is a Class A felony, but increases to a Class Y felony if the victim was a minor at the time of the offense. A person who violates this section by offering to pay, agreeing to pay, or paying a fee to engage in sexual activity upon conviction must pay a fine of $250 to the Safe Harbor Fund for Sexually Exploited Children.
  • A.C.A. §5-18-104. Patronizing a Victim of Human Trafficking. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly engages in commercial sexual activity with another person knowing that the other person is a victim of human trafficking. This is a Class B felony, unless the victim was a minor at the time of the offense, in which case it is a Class A felony.
  • Arkansas Code §5-26-314. Unlawful Distribution of Sexual Images or Recordings. A person commits this offense if, being 18 years of age or older, with the purpose to harass, frighten, intimidate, threaten, or abuse another person, the actor distributes an image, picture, video, or voice or audio recording of the other person to a third person by any means if the image, picture, video, or voice or audio recording is of a sexual nature or depicts the other person in a state of nudity and the other person is a family or household member of the actor, or another person with whom the actor is in a current or former dating relationship. The fact that an image, picture, video, or voice or audio recording was created with the knowledge or consent of the other person or that the image, picture, video, or voice or audio recording is the property of a person charged under this section is not a defense to prosecution under this section. This is a Class A misdemeanor.
  • Arkansas Code §5-27-221. Permitting Abuse of a Minor. A person commits this offense if, being a parent, guardian, or person legally charged with the care or custody of a minor, he or she recklessly fails to take action to prevent the abuse of a minor. It is a defense to a prosecution for this offense if the parent, guardian, or person legally charged with the care or custody of the minor takes immediate steps to end the abuse of the minor, including prompt notification of a medical or law enforcement authority, upon first knowing or having good reason to know that abuse has occurred. An offense against this section is a Class B felony if the abuse of the minor consisted of sexual intercourse, deviate sexual activity, or caused physical injury or death to the minor. It is a Class D felony if the abuse of the minor consisted of sexual contact or caused physical injury to the minor.
  • Arkansas Code §5-27-303. Engaging Children in Sexually Explicit Conduct for Use in Visual or Print Medium. States that it is a Class B felony to use, employ, entice, coerce or persuade a child to engage in sexually explicit conduct for the purposes of producing any visual or print material. Subsequent offenses are punishable as Class A felonies. A parent or guardian who allows their child to take part in such activity may be punished as per a Class B felony, or a Class A felony for subsequent offenses.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-304. Pandering or Possessing Visual or Print Medium Depicting Sexually Explicit Conduct Involving a Child. States that it is unlawful to sell, distribute, solicit or possess any material which depicts a child engaged in sexually explicit conduct. This is deemed to be a Class C felony for the first offense, increasing to a Class B felony for subsequent offenses.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-305. Transportation of Minors for Prohibited Sexual Conduct. A person commits this offense if the person transports, finances in whole or part the transportation of, or otherwise causes or facilitates the movement of any minor, and the actor knows or has reason to know that prostitution or sexually explicit conduct involving a minor will be commercially exploited by any person, and acts with the purpose that the minor will engage in prostitution or sexually explicit conduct. This is a Class A felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-306. Internet Stalking of a Child. This section states that it is a criminal offense for a person over the age of 21 to use the Internet to solicit, seduce, lure or entice a child aged 15 or under, or a person the offender believes to be of this age, in an effort to arrange a meeting with the child to engage in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual activity or sexually explicit conduct. Also covered in this section is the dissemination or purchase of identifying information of a child aged 15 or under for the purposes of committing the above acts. Both offenses are considered to be Class B felonies if a meeting is arranged, and elevate to a Class A felony offense if a meeting actually takes place, even if the attempted sexual act does not take place.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-307. Sexually Grooming a Child. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly disseminates to a child 13 years of age or younger with or without consideration a visual or print medium depicting sexually explicit conduct with the purpose to entice, induce, or groom the child 13 years of age or younger to engage in sexual intercourse, sexually explicit conduct or deviate sexual activity. This offense is a Class D felony if the actor is 21 years or older or a Class A misdemeanor if the actor is younger than 21 years old. It is a defense under this section to prove that the actor was not more than three years older than the victim, but it ignorance of the child’s age is not a defense.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-402. Employing or Consenting to the Use of a Child in a Sexual Performance. Defines the crime of any person employing, authorizing or inducing a child under the age of 18 to engage in a sexual performance. This is a Class C felony for a first offense, rising to a Class B felony for subsequent breaches of this section.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-403. Producing, Directing, or Promoting a Sexual Performance by a Child. Defines the Class B felony offense of producing or directing a sexual performance by a child under 18 years of age.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-602. Distributing, Possessing, or Viewing of Matter Depicting Sexually Explicit Conduct Involving a Child. States that it is a crime to receive for the purpose of selling, procure, deliver, manufacture, provide, mail, give, lend, trade, publish, transfer, distribute, circulate, present, disseminate, advertise, exhibit, or offer any material which depicts sexually explicit conduct by a child, including in an electronic form and via the Internet. It is also an offense to possess or view through any means, including the Internet, any such material. This is a Class C felony for a first offense rising to a Class B felony subsequently. It is a defense to a charge under this section that the accused believed the child to be 17 or older.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-603. Computer Child Pornography. This section states that it is a Class B felony to use a computer network to facilitate or encourage the creation or sharing of any material depicting sexually explicit conduct by a child.
  • A.C.A. § 5-27-604. Failure to Report Computer Child Pornography. States that it is a criminal offense for an owner, operator, or employee of a computer online service, Internet service, or bulletin board service to knowingly fail to report child pornography found on a computer. The offense is a Class A misdemeanor.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-605. Computer Exploitation of a Child. This section states that it is an offense in the first degree to cause or permit a child to engage in sexually explicit conduct, knowing that this will be filmed, photographed, reproduced, or reconstituted in any manner, including online. This is a Class B felony for a first offense, rising to a Class A felony for subsequent breaches of this section. It is a crime in the second degree to photograph a child engaged in sexually explicit conduct or to use a computer to create or reconstruct an image of a child engaged in this behavior. This is deemed to be a Class C felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-27-609. Possession of Sexually Explicit Digital Material. A minor commits this offense, commonly known as “sexting,” if he/she purposely creates, produces, distributes, presents, transmits, posts, exchanges, disseminates, or possesses through a computer, wireless communication device, or digital media, any sexually explicit digital material. It is a defense to this offense that a minor has not solicited the material, does not subsequently distribute, present, transmit, post, print, disseminate, or exchange the sexually explicit digital material, and deletes or destroys the material upon receipt. It is also a defense under this section if a minor creates a photography or other depiction of himself/herself and does not subsequently distribute, present, transmit, post, print, disseminate, or exchange the photograph, digitized impact, or visual depiction of himself or herself. Otherwise, a violation of this section is a Class A misdemeanor. A minor who pleads guilty or nolo contendere to, or is found guilty of, violating this section for a first offense may be ordered to eight hours of community services.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-103. Computer Fraud. A person commits this crime if the person intentionally accesses or causes to be accessed any computer, computer system, computer network, or any part of a computer, computer system, or computer network for the purpose of: (a) devising or executing any scheme or artifice to defraud or extort; or (b) obtaining money, property, or a service with a false or fraudulent intent, representation, or promise. An offense is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-104. Computer Trespass. A person commits this offense if he/she intentionally and without authorization accesses, alters, deletes, damages, destroys, or disrupts any computer, computer system, computer network, computer program, or data. This is a Class C misdemeanor if it is a first violation that does not cause any loss or damage, and a Class B misdemeanor if it is a second or subsequent violation that does not cause any loss or damage, or a violation that causes loss or damage of less than $500. Violations that cause greater financial loss or damage are liable to Class A misdemeanor or Class D felony charges.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-108. Unlawful Computerized Communication. States that it is an offense to harass, frighten, threaten, intimidate or abuse a person by using email or other electronic means. It is also an offense to send an electronic message containing lewd, obscene or profane language. This is a Class A misdemeanor.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-202. Unlawful Act Regarding a Computer. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly and without authorization: (a) modifies, damages, destroys, discloses, uses, transfers, conceals, takes, retains possession of, copies, obtains or attempts to obtain access to, permits access to or causes to be accessed, or enters data or a program that exists inside or outside a computer, system, or network; (b) modifies, destroys, uses, takes, damages, transfers, conceals, copies, retains possession of, obtains or attempts to obtain access to, permits access to or causes to be accessed, equipment or supplies that are used or intended to be used in a computer, system, or network; (c) destroys, damages, takes, alters, transfers, discloses, conceals, copies, uses, retains possession of, obtains or attempts to obtain access to, permits access to or causes to be accessed, a computer, system, or network; (d) obtains and discloses, publishes, transfers, or uses a device used to access a computer, system, network, or data; or (e) introduces, causes to be introduced, or attempts to introduce a computer contaminant into a computer, system, or network. This is usually a Class A misdemeanor, but is a Class C felony if the act was committed to devise or execute a scheme to defraud or illegally obtain property, caused damage of more than $500, or caused an interruption or impairment of a public service.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-203. Unlawful interference with access to computers – Unlawful use or access to computers. A person commits unlawful interference with access to computers if the person knowingly and without authorization interferes with, defines, or causes the denial of access to or use of a computer, system, or network to a person who has the duty and right to use the computer, system, or network. A person also commits this crime if he/she knowingly and without authorization uses, causes the use of, accesses, attempts to gain access to, or causes access to be gained to a computer, system, network, telecommunications device, telecommunications service, or information service. These crimes are Class A misdemeanors. If the violation was committed to devise or execute a scheme to defraud or illegally obtain property, the person is guilty of a Class C felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-204. Unlawful Use of Encryption. A person commits this offense if he/she knowingly uses or attempts to use encryption, directly or indirectly, to: commit, facilitate, further or promote any criminal offense; aid, assist or encourage another person to commit any criminal offense; conceal the commission of any criminal offense; conceal or protect the identity of a person who has committed any criminal offense; or delay, hinder, or obstruct the administration of the law. A person who violates any provision of this section commits a criminal offense that is separate and distinct from any other criminal offense and may be prosecuted and convicted pursuant to this section whether or not the person or any other person is or has been prosecuted or convicted for any other criminal offense arising out of the same facts as the violation of this section. This is a Class D felony if the criminal offense concealed by encryption is a Class Y, Class A or Class B felony. It is a Class A misdemeanor if the criminal offense concealed was a Class C, Class B or unclassified felony. It is a misdemeanor classified one degree below the misdemeanor concealed by encryption.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-205. Unlawful Act Involving Electronic Mail. A person commits this offense if, with the purpose to devise or execute a scheme to defraud or illegally obtain property, the person knowingly and with the purpose to transmit or cause to be transmitted the item of electronic mail to the electronic mail address of one or more recipients without their knowledge of or consent to the transmission falsifies or forges any data, information, image, program, signal, or sound contained in the email, among other actions. Any offense under this section is a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-41-206. Computer Password Disclosure. A person commits this offense if he/she purposely and without authorization discloses a number, code, password or other means of access to a computer or computer network that is subsequently used to access a computer or computer network. This is a normally a Class D misdemeanor, but is a Class D felony if the violation was committed to devise or execute a scheme to defraud or illegally obtain property.
  • A.C.A. §5-68-502. Selling, Loaning, or Displaying Pornography to Minors. A person violates this section if he/she knowingly displays material that is harmful to minors in such a way that the material is exposed to the view of a minor as part of the invited general public. The person is not deemed to have displayed material harmful to minors if the material is kept behind devices commonly known as “blinder racks” so that the lower two-thirds of the material is not exposed to view or material harmful to minors is not contained on the front cover, back cover, or binding of the displayed material. It is an offense to sell, furnish, present, distribute, allow to view, or otherwise disseminate to a minor with or without consideration any material that is harmful to minors. It is an offense to present to a minor or participate in presenting to a minor with or without consideration any performance that is harmful to minors. However, these offenses do not apply to dissemination by a parent, guardian, or relative of the minor, or with the consent of the minor’s parent or guardian. An offense is a Class B misdemeanor.
  • A.C.A. §5-70-104. Promoting Prostitution in the First Degree. This section states that anyone who advances prostitution or profits from the prostitution of a minor under the age of 18 is guilty of a Class D felony.
  • A.C.A. §5-71-217. Cyberbullying. Defines the offense as to transmit, post or send electronic communication in furtherance of severe, repeated, or hostile behavior to another person with the intent to coerce, frighten, threaten, intimidate, abuse, alarm or harass that person. Cyberbullying is a Class B misdemeanor. It is a Class A misdemeanor if the victim was a school employee.
  • A.C.A. §12-12-9. Sex Offender Registration Act of 1997. Requires convicted sex offenders to register with the authorities when residing in Arkansas. Failure to register or failure to notify a change of address is a Class C felony.