Sweden

Population

9,801,616

Population 0‑14

17.1%

Internet Users

94.6%

Facebook Users

5,600,000

Mobile Subscribers

14,800,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2008 - The Swedish National Agency for Education provided teacher training through its PIM (Practical ICT and Media skills) program. The program is an internet resource that aims to enhance teachers‟ skills in use of information technology for teaching and learning. PIM materials are free to access and can be used individually or by a group for training. Approximately 46000 teachers were active in their use of PIM.

2009 - There is no explicit national policy but it could be derived from the on-going assignments that the Swedish Government assigned to the National Agency for Education. The tasks given to the agency are: implement use of ICT in the teaching and learning processes, support the development of communication between schools, students and homes, monitor the development, research and other national and international studies, maintain and develop the dialogue with all stakeholders i.e. other agencies, interested organisations, vendors and other parties concerned, promote the safe and critical use of ICT.

The government’s Broadband Strategy, published in 2009, aims to equip 90% of households and businesses with broadband minimum at the speed of 100 Mbps by 2020, with 40% having access at that speed by 2015. This goal requires the establishment of regulations that aid good market conditions and eliminate technical obstacles. The strategy’s proposed initiatives include investments in broadband for rural areas, good market competition and spectrum management.

2010 - The Swedish Government passed Education Act 2010, where the new syllabuses gives more attention to the use of ICT in the education sector.

2011 - The Government published ICT for Everyone – A Digital Agenda for Sweden with objectives that Sweden will be the best in the world at exploiting the opportunities afforded by digitisation, including achieving a top ranking in other areas such as gender equality in the ICT sector, democracy and human rights, and the ability of schoolchildren to use computers. Four strategic areas have been developed, including providing an easy and safe to use ICT technology, providing services that create benefit, fulfilling the ICT need for infrastructure, and increasing role of ICT in societal development. Since 2011, all teachers are required to know how critically and safely use digital tools in the pedagogic activities upon their graduation from teachers training programs.

After a successful first phase in 2009, the e-Skills Council relaunched VäljIT (“Choose IT”), an initiative for getting more young people to study and work in ICT. The e-Skills Council (IT-Kompetensrådet), set up by IT&Telekomföretagen as a forum for agreeing on and developing joint activities for meeting business and public sector long-term e-skills needs. The Council researches and disseminates information about e-skills demand today and in the future, prepares proposals regarding the interface between industry and the education sector, and acts as a referral body for policy proposals from the government or other bodies.

2014 - All 21 regions in Sweden have agreed to create and sustain regional digital agendas, come into force during 2014, with emphasis on e-services, broadband, health, and schools. The IT&Telekomföretagen launched Next Up initiative to give students the opportunity to learn how it is to work with IT, it aims to inspire young people, especially girls, to study and career choices, leading to a future in the IT sector. Academedia launched ”Framtidens språk” (Future Language), an initiative that is run by the IT College and NTI high school to make programming more accessible to all as well as to encourage young people to try out programming and to influence the government to bring in programming and digital content creation in Swedish schools curriculum.

2016 - The Swedish Media Council and BRIS celebrated Safer Internet Day with a campaign for the children’s most important resource: their parents. The organization launched a kit for parents that holds information about young people and the internet, online bullying and hate speech, and a guide on how they can support their children in their digital lives.

BRIS - Children’s Rights in the Society

A politically and religiously independent children’s rights organization that listens to, supports and strengthens children and young adults’ rights in society. In addition, BRIS works to influence public opinion and decision makers, as well as increase the respect adults have for children as individuals. The knowledge BRIS gains through calls, chats and email on the Children’s Helpline, the BRIS-mail and the BRIS-chat constitutes an important resource in the work to raise awareness of the needs of children and young people among adults, the public and decision makers.

ECPAT Sweden

An International organization that collaborates with other NGOs, authorities and part of the industry to fight commercial sexual exploitation of children, as well as runs a web-based hotline, where the general public can anonymously report cases of CSEC.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

Financial Coalition against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

The organization works to impede and prevent the trade in images of child sexual abuse generate large revenues and is run just like other illegal enterprises that set out to make as much money as possible. It is also a member of European Financial Coalition against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children Online.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

iEARN Sweden

An international non-profit organization that leads a national drive for training trainers, professional development of teachers/ educators and curriculum development (for ICTs in secondary education) thus preparing the country for true education in the 21st century.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Europe

The ITU is is the UN agency for ICTs. Areas of focus in Europe include improving E-accessibility in Central and Eastern Europe, transitioning Europe to digital broadcasting, and sharing best practices for implementing e-applications.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

Internet Knowledge

This project produced sixteen training videos aimed to increase understanding of netiquette and online risks, teaching school children how to be better Internet users.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Kränkt.se

A website for victims of online abuse, primarily defamation. Here victims can find information, help and tips on how to protect themselves and what actions to take if they have suffered online abuse.

Länkskafferiet (Link Library)

This is a database of quality links for educational use, meant as a pedagogical aid for Swedish children between five and eighteen years of age, in their search for useful information on the Internet. Teachers and librarians can use the service to guide the pupils in their search and find good resources for lesson planning

Plan International Sweden

A non-profit organization that has been promoting children’s right to protection from all forms of violence and harmful practices.

Preventell

A national helpline for those who feel they have lost control of their sexual behavior, who are perhaps worried about their thoughts and actions, or who are afraid they might hurt themselves or someone else.

Radda Barnen (Save the Children Sweden)

A child rights organization that works to ensure that all children have their rights respected, they support children in vulnerable situations - in Sweden and in the world raise public opinion on children’s rights.

Safer Internet Centre Sweden (SIC SE)

The center, operated by the Swedish Media Council, promotes a safer and better use of the internet and mobile technologies among children and young people, as well as develops awareness raising material, organises campaigns and information sessions.

Surfa Lugnt

Translates as Calm Surfing, this website is a collaboration between a range of corporate organizations and government bodies. It covers a range of Internet safety topics from computer security to avoiding sexual predators and is aimed very much at teenagers.

Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB)

The MSB is responsible for issues concerning civil protection, public safety, emergency management and civil defense as long as no other authority has responsibility. Responsibility refers to measures taken before, during and after an emergency or crisis. Its Internet safety section on its website, providing advice to both business customers and consumers.

Swedish National Agency for Educatio

The Swedish National Agency for Education is the administrative body responsible for all public schools throughout Sweden. It runs a portal (i.e. search-engine) called Spindeln (“Spider” in English), which connects a number of archives. Spider is connected to the European Schoolnet LRE portal.

Swedish Police Tip Report Site

This unit of the National Criminal Police deals with sexual abuse against children and endeavors to stop the diffusion of pictures and films consisting in child pornography on the Internet. It is also a member of European Financial Coalition against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children Online.

The Swedish Media Council

The Council studies and reports biannually on the habits of children and young people, with an aim to reduce the risks of harmful effects of the media. The Council covers all moving image media, i.e. the Internet, film, television, computer and video games. It also operates the Swedish Safer Internet Centre, part of the EU’s INSAFE network.

A Survey on the Transposition of Directive 2011/93/EU on Combating Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography (2016)

Together Against Sexual Exploitation of Children

The study examines how seven key provisions of Directive 2011/93/EU on the fight against sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography have been adopted by the 27 European Union (EU) Member States bound by the Directive.

Committee on the Rights of the Child Reviews 12 countries’ Child Rights Records (2015)

OHCHR

This report reviews 12 States’ actions based on the obligations to the Convention of the Rights of the Child and its optional protocols

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

The impact of internet and new media on the occurrence of violence against children in Europe and Cyprus (2015)

Rosella Sala

This document demonstrate that countries lack of expertise on child sexual exploitation and struggle combating this issue by their own. It suggests to establish an international legal framework to prosecute offenders and protect children.

Child sexual exploitation: a study of international comparisons (2015)

Cameron, G., Sayer, E. M., Thomson, L., and Wilson, S

The report focuses on the issue of Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) in high income countries, including Sweden, Ireland, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the USA.

Child Sexual Explitation: A study of International Comparison (2015)

The Virtual Staff College

This report presents a rapid desk review of international comparisons of CSE.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

Young People Who Produce and Send Nude Images: Context, Motivation and Consequences (2015)

L. Jonsson, K. Cooper, E. Quayle, C.G. Svedin, K. Hervy

For this study, researchers interviewed young people who self-reported sending or posting nude images of themselves before the age of 18.

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Mapping Safer Internet Policies in the Member States (2014)

P. Baudouin, B. Mahieu, T. Dor, B. Good, J. Milayi, S. Nakajima

The purpose of the study was to set up a framework for analysing Better Internet for Children public policies covering EU Member States, and Norway and Iceland.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

Policy Influences and Country Clusters: A Comparative Analysis of Internet Safety Policy Implementation (2014)

B. O'Neill

The report examines the policy context of internet safety and looks at how countries within each cluster approach implementation.

Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online: Sweden (2014)

European Comission

Report on Sweden's commitment to stop Child Sexula Abuse Online

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Overview and Analysis of 1:1 Learning Initiatives in Europe (2013)

Intel

Intel 's report on the status of 1:1 Learning Initiative in Europe

In their own words: what bothers children online? (2013)

Livingstone S., Kirwil, L., Ponte C. and Staksrud E., with the EU Kids Online network

The results of a survey of nearly 10,000 children in 25 countries across Europe, this report details what children say upsets them and their friends online

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation (2013)

Helsper, E. J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B. and De Haan, J. with members of the EU Kids Online network

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives. (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

EU Kids Online: Excessive Internet Use among European Children (2012)

Smahel, D, Helsper, E, Green, L, Kalmus, V, Blinka, L, Ólafsson, K,

This report uses the data from the EU Kids Online study to examine excessive use of the Internet by children in the 25 participating countries.

Report on risks faced by children online and policies to protect them (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

Excessive Internet Use by European Children (2012)

D. Smahel, E. Helsper, L. Green, V. Kalmus, L. Blinka, K. Ólafsson

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children.

Risks and safety on the internet: The perspective of European children. Full Findings (2011)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., Ólafsson, K

Building on the original study, EU Kids Online I, this second piece of research includes the findings from research which took place in 25 countries. Children in the 9 – 16 age group were surveyed on their experiences of online use, risk and safety

ECPAT Global Monitoring Report: Sweden (2011)

ECPAT

Status of action against commercial sexual exploitation of children in Sweden

Online Behavior Related to Child Sexual Abuse (2011)

M. Ainsaar, L. Lööf

This report provides a review of studies, with a specific focus on sexually abusive online experiences and offline sexual abuse that have started with an online contact or where the contacts between the perpetrator and the young person have relied heavily on information and communication technologies.

2010 Norton Online Family Report (2010)

Norton by Symantec

The report reveals how children are spending more time online and have had more negative online experiences than parents realize. It highlights different approaches taken by families globally and uncovers the emotional impact of children’s negative online experiences.

Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe (2009)

Eurydice

The study covers 30 European countries and provides information on whether online safety is taught and how it is taught in schools within the participating countries.

EU Kids Online: Final report (2009)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L.

One of the foremost pieces of research into the online habits of children in the European Union is the EU Kids Online research, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Plus Programme between 2006 and 2009.

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU – a parents’ perspective. (2008)

Eurobarometer

The study covers 27 EU Member States and provides parental responses to a range of questions relating to Internet safety and their perception of risk.

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU - a parents' perspective (2008)

Eurobarometer

The study covers 27 EU Member States and provides parental responses to a range of questions relating to Internet safety and their perception of risk.

Child Trafficking in Europe, A broad vision to put children first (2008)

Unicef Innocenti Research Centre

This Innocenti report was developed with assistance of many experts. The report's key findings addresses child trafficking patterns and flow, which is occuring all over Europe; discusses positive developments; lists challenges; lists international standards and national legislations to combat child trafficking; discusses policy responses; and finally shares different approaches to combat this epidemic.

E-learning Nordic 2006 - Impact of ICT on Education (2006)

The Nordic Ministries of Education and Ramboll Managements

The study focuses on the impact of ICT in education in three key areas: pupils’ performance; teaching and learning processes; knowledge-sharing, communication and home-school co-operation. More than 8000 persons from Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark participated in the study.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of simple majority in Sweden is eighteen. The age of consent for sexual activity is fifteen, as defined by Chapter 6, Section 4 of the Penal Code. The age of consent for marriage is eighteen.

Sweden has signed, but not ratified the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (November 2001).

  • Section 1, Chapter 5, Penal Code. Defamation. Defines defamation as accusing somebody of a crime or as having a reprehensible way of living, or otherwise furnishing information intended to cause exposure to the disrespect of others. Defamation is punishable by a fine. Where expressing the information was part of the offender’s duty, if the supply of the information was defensible, or if the matter was true, no punishment will be imposed.
  • Section 2, Chapter 5, Penal Code. Gross Defamation. States that where the defamation is regarded as gross, an aggravated penalty of a fine or imprisonment for up to two years will apply. When assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration shall be given to whether the information was intended to bring serious damage.
  • Section 3, Chapter 5, Penal Code. Insult. Defines insulting behavior as vilifying another person by an insulting epithet or accusation or by other infamous conduct. The penalty for this offense is a fine. Where the crime is gross, an aggravated penalty of a fine or imprisonment for up to six months will apply.
  • Section 1, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Rape. This section states that anyone who, by assault, violence or threat forces another person to have sexual intercourse or to commit or endure another sexual act similar to sexual intercourse, is guilty of the offense termed rape and liable to imprisonment for between two to six years. The same sentence applies to anyone who exploits another person’s state of unconsciousness, sleep, intoxication or other drug influence, illness, physical injury or mental disturbance, or otherwise helpless state in order to have sexual intercourse with that person. Where the offense is considered less aggravated, a reduced sentence of up to four years’ imprisonment will apply. Where the crime is considered gross, the penalty will be increased to imprisonment for a term of between four to ten years. Gross circumstances include, but are not limited to, situations where the offense was committed jointly by more than one perpetrator; the violence or threat was of a particularly serious nature or where the offender exhibited particular ruthlessness or brutality.
  • Section 2, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Sexual Coercion. Defines sexual coercion as inducing another person by unlawful coercion to undertake or endure a sexual act, unless the act constitutes a more serious crime as specified in Section 1. Anyone guilty of the offense is liable to imprisonment for up to two years. The same sentence applies to anyone who exploits another person’s state of unconsciousness, sleep, intoxication or other drug influence, illness, physical injury or mental disturbance, or otherwise helpless state in order to carry out a sexual act with that person. Where the crime is considered gross, the penalty will be increased to imprisonment for a term of between six months to six years. When assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration should be given to whether the offense was committed jointly by more than one perpetrator, or whether the offender exhibited particular ruthlessness or brutality.
  • Section 4, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Rape of a Child. This section states that anyone who has sexual intercourse with a child under fifteen years of age, or who with such a child carries out another sexual act comparable to sexual intercourse, will be sentenced for rape of a child to imprisonment for a minimum of two and a maximum of six years. The section also states that where the offense is considered gross, a sentence of imprisonment for a minimum of four and a maximum of ten years shall be imposed for gross rape of a child. When assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration should be given to whether the offense was committed jointly by more than one perpetrator, or whether the offender exhibited particular ruthlessness or brutality.
  • Section 5, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Sexual Exploitation of a Child. States that if the rape of a child under the age of fifteen is considered less serious, the offender shall be sentenced for sexual exploitation of a child to imprisonment for up to four years.
  • Section 8, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Exploitation of a Child for Sexual Posing. Imposes a penalty of imprisonment for up to two years for anyone who promotes or exploits performance and participation in sexual posing by a child under fifteen years of age. The same sentence applies to anyone who commits such an act against a child who has attained the age of fifteen but not eighteen if the posing is by its nature likely to damage the child’s health or development. The section also states that where the offense is considered gross, a sentence of imprisonment for between six months and six years shall be imposed. In assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration should be given to whether the offense has concerned a large-scale activity, brought significant financial gain or involved ruthless exploitation of the child.
  • Section 9, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Purchase of a Sexual Act from a Child. This section states that it is an offense to induce a child to undertake or endure a sexual act in return for payment. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to two years. The sentence also applies if the payment was given or promised by another person.
  • Section 10, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Sexual Molestation. States that anyone who sexually touches a child under fifteen years of age or induces the child to undertake or participate in an act with sexual implications, is guilty of an offense and liable to a fine or imprisonment for up to two years. This also applies to a person who exposes himself or herself to another person in a manner that is likely to cause discomfort, or who otherwise, by word or deed, molests a person in a way that is likely to violate that person’s sexual integrity.
  • Section 11, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Purchase of Sexual Services. States that it is an offense to obtain sexual relations in return for payment. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to six months. The sentence also applies if the payment was given or promised by another person.
  • Section 12, Chapter 6, Penal Code. Procuration. Defines the crime of procuration as the promotion or improper financial exploitation of a person’s engagement in casual sexual relations in return for payment. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to four years. Where the offense is considered gross, an increased penalty of imprisonment for a term between two to eight years will apply. In assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration should be given to whether the offense concerned a large-scale activity, brought significant financial gain or involved the ruthless exploitation of another person.
  • Section 13, Chapter 6, Penal Code. States that where an offence under this Chapter is committed in respect of a person under a certain age, it is immaterial that the accused did not know that the person had not attained that age, but had reasonable grounds for assuming the victim to be under the given age.
  • Section 15, Chapter 6, Penal Code. This section states that an attempt to commit any of the aforementioned crimes shall be punished according to Chapter 23 of this Code.
  • Section 10a, Chapter 16, Penal Code. Child Pornography. Imposes a penalty of imprisonment for up to two years or, if it is a petty crime, a fine or imprisonment for up to six months for anyone who depicts children in a pornographic picture; distributes, transfers, shows, puts such a picture of a child at another person’s disposal or in another way makes such a picture available for another person; acquires or offers such a picture of a child for sale; procures contacts between buyers and sellers of such picture of children or takes another similar measure with the view to promoting trafficking in such pictures; or has such a picture of children in his possession. The term child refers to a person whose puberty development is not completed or who is under the age of eighteen. The section also states that anyone who professionally or in another way for the purpose of making money through negligence distributes such a picture that is referred to above is liable to the same punishment. Where the offense is considered gross, an aggravated penalty of imprisonment for a term between six months to four years will apply. In assessing whether the crime is gross, special consideration should be given to whether the offense has been committed professionally or for the purpose of making profit; has formed part of criminal activities that have been carried on methodically or to a great extent; has concerned an especially large number of pictures or has concerned pictures where children are subjected to especially ruthless treatment.
  • Section 17, Chapter 16, Penal Code. States that anyone who prepares or conspires to mutiny, or who fails to disclose a mutiny, shall be sentenced in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 23. The same also applies to the crime of attempting to commit child pornography-related crimes described in Section 10a, first paragraph if it is not petty, and to attempts or preparation to commit gross child pornography crime.
  • Section 1, Chapter 23, Penal Code. Attempt to Commit Crimes. This section states that anyone who has begun to commit an offense without completing it will be sentenced for the attempt to commit crimes, if there was a danger that the act would lead to the completion of the crime or such danger had been precluded only because of fortuitous circumstances. The penalty to attempt will be at most what is applicable to a completed crime and no less than imprisonment if the least punishment for the completed crime is imprisonment for two years or more.
  • Section 4, Chapter 23, Penal Code. States that the penalties provided for an act will not only be imposed on the person who committed the crime but also on anyone who furthered the offense by advice or deed. Anyone who induced another person to commit an offense will be sentenced for instigation of the crime and otherwise for aiding the crime.
  • Section 5, Chapter 23, Penal Code. States that if someone has been induced to be an accomplice to crime by coercion, deceit or misuse of his youth, innocence or dependent status or has been an accomplice only to a minor extent, the punishment imposed may be less than that otherwise provided for the crime. Punishment shall not be imposed in petty cases.
  • Section 1, Act on Responsibility for Electronic Bulletin Boards. Scope. States that this Act applies to electronic bulletin boards, which is defined as a service for mediation of electronic messages.
  • Section 5, Act on Responsibility for Electronic Bulletin Boards. Obligation to Erase Certain Messages. This section states that if a user submits a message to an electronic bulletin board, the supplier must remove the message, or in some other way make it inaccessible, if the content is about child pornography, among other things.
  • Section 7, Act on Responsibility for Electronic Bulletin Boards. Penalties. Imposes a penalty of a fine or imprisonment for up to six months for anyone who intentionally or through gross carelessness violates Section 5. This will be increased to imprisonment for up to two years if the offense is grave. Minor violations will not be sentenced.

1996 - Sweden hosted the First World Congress against the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and also assisted the organisational committee in preparing for the two conferences that followed.

2005 - ECPAT Sweden initiated the voluntary blocking cooperation between Swedish National Police and the ISPs. Furthermore, ECPAT Sweden launched hotline where internet users can report online child sexual abuse material. ECPAT Sweden is also an active member in the INHOPE global association of hotlines. Since its launch, ECPAT has . As of 2015, ECPAT received received approximately 50 000 reports of possible online child sexual abuse material. The first “Barnahus” (Children’s Advocacy Center) was established in Sweden. Barnhus is a reception and advocacy centre for child victims of sexual abuse and exploitation, which is composed of police, public prosecutors, forensic doctors, social workers and child psychologists who aim to provide child victims one place to go for legal and other support services. As 2015, 30 centers have opened around the country.

2007 - Sweden updated its National Action Plan for Safeguarding Children from Sexual Exploitation. Ten measures were implemented by the Government in cooperation with other relevant stakeholders between 2007 and 2012. These broadly include actions to address child sex tourism; dissemination of knowledge and information; identification of measures aimed at offenders; increased cooperation at the national and international levels; and review of legislation.

2008 - ECPAT Sweden founded a Financial Coalition against Child Pornography, which includes most Swedish banks and the members, in collaboration with Police, impede and prevent payments for commercial child pornographic material.

2012 - Along with 54 countries, Sweden has joined the Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online. The Alliance unites Ministers of the Interior and of Justice from each country to fight against Child Sexual Abuse Online, to rescue victims, to develop more effective prosecution, and to reduce the amount of child sexual abuse images available online. Linköping University in partnership with other institutions completed ROBERT, a project intended to make online interaction safe for children and young people through learning from experiences of online abuse and factors that make individuals vulnerable. The research project focused on increasing the understanding of the way online contacts may develop into ones that are sexually abusive.

2013 - The mobile operator Telenor developed a filtering system across several Scandinavian countries, including Sweden. Working in partnership with Kripos (the Norwegian Criminal Investigation Service) Telenor utilizes technology to block websites with child sexual abuse content and other websites that are deemed illegal by Kripos. Furthermore, Telenor Sweden has partnered up with ECPAT to takes a stand against sexual abuse of children. The partnership aims to prevent child sex trafficking in existing and new products and services, and to raise awareness on the issue among employees, customers and suppliers. In 2015, the partnership developed a Telenor Safe Report, a bookmark available in all Telenor mobile devices, which enables the user to report illegal content directly to ECPAT Hotline.

2014 - The Swedish Government commissioned the Centre for Andrology and Sexual Medicine at Karolinska Institute to operate and further develop the national ‘stop telephone service’ called ‘PrevenTell’ in order to reach persons, who practice or are at risk of committing sexual violence, and further to create an interactive website to supplement the telephone-based services.

2015 - Telenor Sweden launched “Safe on Internet”, a long-term initiative to help customers and their families to feel safe on internet. To support parents in this dialogue, Telenor created a web talk-guide in cooperation with partner Surfa Lugnt, which offers an easy way for parents to start talking and engage with their children about life online.

The Council of Baltic Sea States Children’s Unit met in Stockholm to discuss ‘child exploitation: cross national child protection in practice’ and reflect on the PROTECT Children on the Move Expert Meetings series. The PROTECT initiative, ran from 2013 - 2015, aimed to identify child rights standards, good practices, and key agencies responsible for protecting children on the move recognising that this group of children is particularly vulnerable to exploitation.The project will produce a report from the expert meeting series, guidelines on the human rights and best interests of the child in transnational situations, and a ‘wiki’ as an online tool outlining relevant laws and policies for transnational child protection.

2016 - The Centre for Andrology and Sexual Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital launched the Priotab study (Paedophilia at risk – Investigations of treatment and biomarkers) to find treatments for individuals in the risk zone for committing sexual assaults on children. They have been investigating whether preventive medication can reduce the risk of someone committing assaults on children.