Russia

Population

142,423,773

Population 0‑14

16.7%

Internet Users

70.5%

Facebook Users

11,000,000

Mobile Subscribers

248,100,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2002 - A federal target-oriented program Electronic Russia (e-Russia) 2002 – 2010, initiated by the Russian Government, aimed at computerizing the country and encouraging the development of IT and communications sectors. Additionally, the Ministry of Education and Science, in co-operation with regional authorities, completed a program of computerization in country schools, supplying hardware and software together with teacher training in 97 % of schools.

2006 - The cooperation between PH International and Microsoft launched the Information Dissemination and Equal Access (IDEA) project. The project provides training in basic and job-related computer skills and maintains the goal of increasing employability and marketability among undeserved and disadvantaged populations in Russia.Through a network of locally hosted, supported and committed 61 IDEA Centers managed in partnership with libraries, universities and other non-profits and with the support of regional and municipal authorities, IDEA learning centers provide critical skills to the community.

2007 - Intel and the charitable foundation Volnoe Delo partnered on the ‘Computers for Students’ project to develop 1:1 eLearning environments in a large number of primary schools in several regions across Russia. Prior to this initiative, Intel has been running an Intel Teach program in Russia since 2002. The program shows teachers how to successfully use ICT to support improved teaching and learning methods in the classroom. Meanwhile, Volnoe Delo has been equipped schools across Russia with PCs laptops, donating one million units to schools nationwide.

2008 - The president of Russia, Vladimir Putin, approved the Information Society Development Strategy, which was elaborated with the assistance of the Institute of the Information Society. The objectives of the strategy is to provide governmental support to competitive domestic production in the sphere of ICT, develop national information infrastructure, and introduce ICT in activity of separate governmental bodies. The World Bank completed its e-Learning Support Project, which was developed in line with the Government’s e-Russia and e-Education Programs. The project played a large role in the creation and distribution of new electronic teaching materials and teacher training in the introduction of ICT into classrooms. Russian secondary education portal was created to serve various users in the domain of the secondary education, among them are teachers, students and their parents, administration of the secondary education institutions, students and teachers of the pedagogical colleges.The portal contains information that is related school curricula, out-of-school and extracurricular activities, rules and regulations on education, primarily issued by the Ministry of Science and Education of the Russian Federation.

2009 - At Russian Internet Forum (RIF-2009) the participants led a discussions about children on RuNet, a Russian based internet sites, and various developments in the provision of websites for children. Since the launch of Intel Security Digital Safety Program, Intel volunteers have educated more than 250,000 children, parents, and teachers worldwide, including Russia, about how to remain safe and secure online.The program is a free global program designed to teach school-aged children and parents how to maintain safe and responsible online practices.

2011 - By the demand of the Ministry of Education and Science, Polymedia, Russian audiovisual market and software developer and provider of education, launched a Distant Learning (DL) system project for 124 schools in Krasnodar Territory in the framework of promoting new information technologies at regional education.

The same year, ECPAT International with the support from the Body Shop Norway, implemented Certified Safe Internet School Project in Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine, and Russia. Completed in 2013, the CISS project supported schools in understanding internet safety for children on child rights principles, including access to information and knowledge, protection from online risks. Through training, school teachers and administrators were educated on children’s behavior online and the related risks, and received tools for the implementation of policies and programs needed to protect children in schools.

2012 - The Ministry of of Telecom and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation set goals for distribution of internet and mobile telecommunication across the country from 2012 - 2018. Beeline, Russian telecommunication company, in cooperation with Children’s Radio, launched internet safety project for children, where safe internet and mobile lessons from Beeline broadcasted by the Children’s Radio.

Microsoft together with PH International launched “Tvoy Kurs: IT for Youth” project as part of the Microsoft global initiative YouthSpark, which aims to help young people realize their full potential in education, employment, and entrepreneurship. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) with support of Communication Administration of the CIS countries and in collaboration with UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies (IITE) and CISCO Network Academy organized the seminar dedicated to International Girls in ICT Day and World Telecommunication and Information Society Day in Moscow. The seminar was dedicated to the role of women in the ICT, where the participants led a discussion on possible ways of a more active involving of women in ICT.

2013 - To promote online safety in Russia, Google launched “Razbiraem Internet” (Analyzing Internet) in collaboration with Moscow State University’s Department of Psychology, the Foundation for Internet Development, and the Russian Institute for Education Development of the Ministry of Education. The program provides advice on how to tell facts from lies on the web, what copyright online is, what information should and should not be shared about yourself and others, and how to protect your data from fraudsters and phishing.

2014 - Currently, Russia is on its second stage of the Russian Innovation Strategy 2020, where the government aims for the development of radical enlargement of innovative entrepreneurs class by supplying necessary education and skills to introduce modern innovative behavioral patterns. In the 2014 - 2020 stage, more emphasis will be given to further development of the elements of innovation infrastructure and increase of their efficiency.

2016 - i-SAFETY Cyber Security Forum, the main Russian conference event on digital safety, is observed every year since 2008 by a large number of Russian and foreign digital safety expert .The primary aim of the Forum is to facilitate exchange of practical experiences and discussion of best practices in the field of digital safety, including awareness-raising, technological issues, strategies and solutions, legislation and governance, as well as analyzing new actual trends in this field. The forum is the official event of Safer Internet Day campaign in Russia and is the main event of Safe Runet Week – the official SID campaign in the Russian Federation, which is held annually since 2008. Kaspersky Lab, a private Russian computer security software company, launched Kaspersky Safe Kids program that allows parents to monitor children’s online activity, prevent them from going to inappropriate websites, and regulate the amount of time they can spend on their computers or mobile devices.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

Foundation for Educational, Scientific and Cultural Cooperation (IFESCCO)

The foundation contributes to the further development of humanitarian cooperation and intercultural communication in the Commonwealth of Independent States in the area of education, science, culture, mass communications, information, archives, sport, tourism and youth matters.

Friendly RuNet Foundation

The Foundation works in close collaboration with Russian Internet users, NGOs, companies and government agencies with the aim of eliminating the circulation of illegal Internet content and other unlawful activities. The Foundation also operates a Hotline as part of the INHOPE network, which they joined in May 2009.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Ministry of Education and Science

A federal executive body responsible for drafting and implementing government policy and legal regulation in the field of education, science, research and development.

Ministry of Telecom and Mass Communications

The Ministry is responsible for telecommunications, mass media, IT and postal services. It is also responsible in developing and implementing national policy and legal regulation in information technology and internet governance.

PH International

Registered under the legal name Project Harmony, Inc., the organization was founded in 1985 for the purpose of cultural and educational exchanges between the then-USSR and the United States. PH International’s mission is to build strong global communities by fostering civic engagement, cross-cultural learning, and increased opportunities in the digital age.

Promethean Planet

International online community that allows teachers to download an interactive whiteboard resources for secondary school lessons and share experiences on the use of interactive whiteboards in schools.

ROCIT

A non-profit organization that promotes the development and distribution of Internet technology in the interests of Russian citizens.

Safe Internet League (STI)

The largest Russian organization fighting dangerous Web content. Their aim is to eradicate dangerous content through community action by IT professionals, industry players, and regular Internet users.

Safer Internet Center-Russia

Formerly, known as the National Internet Safety Node in Russia, the Safer Internet Center became part of the INHOPE network in May 2009 and allows the anonymous reporting of suspected illegal content found on the Internet. It also fulfills an educational purpose, giving information on computer and Internet safety. It is also is part of the Russian National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Soprotivlenie

A NGO, founded in 2005, which provides free legal aid to victims and witnesses of crime, punishable under the Criminal Code, violence, rape, fraud, etc.

Stellit

The promotion of health and social well-being of people through the implementation of evidence-based and effective prevention programs, in the practice of professionals. The NGO established an alliance against CSEC (commercial sexual exploitation of children) with ECPAT International in 2004.

Tvidi.ru

A portal aimed at children which incorporates aspects of social networking but also provides online games, chat rooms and allows members to create their own websites. Registrants to the site are required to be under the age of seventeen and must obtain parental permission before they proceed.

Volnoe Delo

A NGO that was created in 1998 to invest in the future of the country and take an active part in as many different socially significant projects and initiatives as possible.

World Vision

The international organization helps to enact sustainable solutions for the future of children, families, and communities in Russia.

Growing Up Online What Kids Conceal (2016)

Kaspersky Lab

A global study into the behaviors of children online and how constant connectivity impacts the way they communicate and leverage technology in their daily lives.

Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A Qualitative Exploratory Study Across Seven Countries (2015)

S. Chaudron

This report presents a pilot qualitative study designed and implemented in collaboration with a selected group of academic partners in different European countries that aims at pioneering in Europe the exploration of children younger than 8 years old and their families` experiences with new technologies.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (2014)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Reducing violence agains children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Reducing violence against children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI) (2013)

Microsoft

The survey, Computing Safety Index, measures the steps people report taking to protect their computers, mobile phones, and info online in the categories of foundational, technical and behavioral.

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

Zero to Eight: Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, Donell, Green, Lelia and Livingstone, Sonia

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI). (2013)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation. (2013)

Ellen J. Helsper, Veronika Kalmus, Uwe Hasebrink, Bence Sagvari, Jos de Haan

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

Russian Kids Online: Key findings of the EU Kids Online II survey in Russia (2013)

Galina Soldatova, Elena Rasskazova, Ekaterina Zotova, Maria Lebesheva, Marina Geer and Polina Roggendorf

This report gives detailed results from the national survey undertaken in Russia as part of the EU Kids II programme, including how and where Russian children access the Internet, and their experiences of Internet issues such as cyberbullying.

ECPAT Global Monitoring Report: Russian Federation (2012)

ECPAT

Status of action against commercial sexual exploitation of children in Russia

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Global Digital Communication: Texting, Social Networking Popular Worldwide (2012)

J. Menasce Horowitz, K. Simmons, J. Poushter, C. Barker

The report is a part of the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project, which conducts opinion surveys on subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day.

Promotion of the use of Information and Communication Technologies in Technical and Vocational Education and Training in CIS countries (2012)

UNICEF

This analytical report presents the results of a comparative study on current situation and main tendencies in ICT use in TVET in CIS countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. Besides, the report includes recommendations on further development and improvement of the use of modern ICTs in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET).

EU Kids Online: National perspectives. (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

Small World, Big Responsibility: The UK’s role in the global trade in children (2012)

Erika Hall, Phillippa Lei

This report preset information on the different forms of child exploitation. Its purpose is to raise awareness to this global issue.

ICT in Primary Education (2012)

Ivan Kalaš, Haif E. Bannayan, Leslie Conery, Ernesto Lava, Diana Laurillard, Cher Ping Lim, Sarietjie Musgrave, Alexei Semenov, Márta Turcsányi-Szabó

Status of implementation of ICT in primary schools in Slovakia, Jordan, United States, Chile, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, South Africa, Russia, and Hugnary.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey. (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Online Behavior Related to Child Sexual Abuse (2011)

M. Ainsaar, L. Lööf

This report provides a review of studies, with a specific focus on sexually abusive online experiences and offline sexual abuse that have started with an online contact or where the contacts between the perpetrator and the young person have relied heavily on information and communication technologies.

Safety and Security on the Internet Challenges and Advances in Member States (2011)

World Health Organization

Evaluation of public health threat presented by the Internet in every Member States.

RuNet Generation (2011)

UNICEF

This report focuses on the technological reality in Russia and the peculiarities of its digital landscape, investigates the use of digital networked technologies by Russian adolescents and young people, and analyses the research available on the types of safety risks faced by the Russian youth when navigating the Internet.

Child Pornography: Industry of Violance (2010)

Friendly Runet Foundation

Status of distribution of child porngoraphy in Russia

Education Transformation in Russia (2009)

Intel Corporation

A case study about the transformation of Russian education system in to the 21st century

Combating Child Sex Tourism: Question and Answers (2008)

ECPAT

This is a general information document on Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children. It also gives an overview of the global situation.

Regional Overview on Child Sexual Abuse Images Through the Use of Information and Communication Technologies in Belarus, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine (2008)

ECPAT

This regional report provides an overview of the situation based on the information collected in the literature reviews and the detailed analysis of cases.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of full majority is eighteen, as established by the Civil Code and the age of consent for sexual activity is sixteen as determined by Article 134 of the Criminal Code.

2012 - On September of 2012, Federal Law of the Russian Federation, signed on December 29, 2010, N 436-FZ “On protection of children from information harmful to their health and development”, came into effect. The Law regulates the relations connected with the protection of children from information harmful to their health and development. The information prohibited for distribution to children includes information that encourages children to commit acts that threaten their life; uses of narcotics, psychotropic, intoxicants, tobacco, alcohol, gambling, prostitution, begging; encourages cruelty to carry out acts of violence against people or animals; denies family values ​​and forming disrespect for parents; contains foul language; and contains the information of a pornographic nature.

2014 - The Russian Government amended the Federal Law No. 149-FZ “On Information, Information Technologies and Protection of Information” by extending the application of enforcement measures from movies to all objects of copyright and related rights, which can be distributed in the Internet (exception for photographic works and works obtained by processes similar to photography).

2016 - Signed by the president in July, 2015, the Law N264-FZ “Right to be Forgotten” came into effect on January 2016, amending Articles 29 and 402 of the Civil Procedure Code of the Russian Federation. It allows internet user to hide online false or outdated information about themselves. Russian citizens can contact a search engine and asked to remove links to their pages from the search list.

The country has not signed the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (April 2016).

  • Chapter 17, Criminal Code. Article 126. Abduction. This Article states that abduction is punishable by deprivation of liberty for between four and eight years. An increased sentence of imprisonment for between five and ten years is applicable (among other conditions) where the crime was committed by more than one person; where the victim was a juvenile; where violence or threat were used or where weapons or other dangerous objects were used by the offender.
  • Chapter 17, Criminal Code. Article 127.1. Human Being’s Trafficking. States that the he purchase-and-sale of a human being, other transactions with respect to a person, as well as the recruiting, carriage, transfer, concealment or receiving performed for the purpose of his or her exploitation - shall be punishable by compulsory labor for a term of up to five years or by deprivation of liberty for a term of up to six years.
  • Chapter 17, Criminal Code. Article 129. Slander. Defines the crime of the deliberate spreading of falsified information that denigrates the honor and dignity of another person or undermines the victim’s reputation. The offense is punishable by a fine of up to 80,000 Rubles or up to six months’ salary, by compulsory work for between 120 to 180 hours or by corrective labor of up to one year. The Article also states that where slander was committed in a contained public space or in mass-media, the penalties increase to up to 120,000 Rubles or up to one year’s salary, compulsory work for between 120 to 180 hours, corrective labor for up to one year or arrest for a term of three to six months.
  • Chapter 17, Criminal Code. Article 130. Insult. This Article defines the crime of insult, which is described as the denigration of the honor and dignity of another person, expressed in an indecent form. This offense is punishable by a fine of up to 40,000 Rubles or up to three months’ salary, by compulsory work for up to 120 hours or by corrective labor for up to six months. If the insult was committed in a contained public space or in mass-media, the penalties increase to up to 80,000 Rubles or up to six months’ salary, compulsory work for up to 180 hours or corrective labor for up to six months.
  • Chapter 18, Criminal Code. Article 131. Rape. Defines the offense as engaging in sexual relations through the application of force or with the threat of its application to the victim or to other persons, or by making use of the helpless state of the victim. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for between three to six years. If the victim is known to be a minor, the minimum term of imprisonment increases to four years. The maximum term of imprisonment does not increase. Where the victim is under the age of fourteen, the punishment is imprisonment for between eight and fifteen years.
  • Chapter 18, Criminal Code. Article 132. Violent Sexual Actions. Defines the offense of making homosexual, lesbian or other advances of a sexual nature with the application of force or with the threat of its application to the victim (male or female), or to other persons, or making use of the helpless state of the victim (male or female). This offense is punishable by imprisonment for between three and six years. If the offense is committed against a minor of either sex, it is punishable by imprisonment for a between four and ten years. If the offense is committed against a child under the age of fourteen, it is punishable by imprisonment for between eight and fifteen years.
  • Chapter 18, Criminal Code. Article 133. Compulsion to actions of a sexual character. This Article states that compelling a person to engage in sexual relations, homosexuality, lesbianism or to perform other actions of a sexual character by means of blackmail, threat of destruction, damage or seizure of property is an offense. This is punishable by fine of between 200 to 300 times the amount of the minimal labor wage or in the amount of the labor wage or other income of the convicted person for a period of between two to three months. Alternatively, a sentence of correctional work may be imposed for a period of up to 2 years, or a term of imprisonment for up to one year.
  • Chapter 18, Criminal Code. Article 134. Illicit Sexual Relations or Other Sexual Actions with a Person Who Has Not Attained 16 Years of Age. This Article defines the offense of sexual relations, homosexual or lesbian acts, performed by a person over the age of eighteen with a person who is under the age of sixteen. This offense is punishable by ‘limitation of liberty’ for up to three years, or by imprisonment for up to four years. The deeds stipulated by Part One and Two of this Article committed by a person who has reached twelve years of age but has not reached fourteen years of age - shall be punishable with deprivation of freedom for a term of three to ten years.
  • Chapter 18, Criminal Code. Article 135. Depraved Actions. The commission of lecherous actions without using violence by a person who has reached eighteen years of age in respect of a person who has not reached sixteen years of age and sexual maturity - shall be punishable by obligatory labour for a term of up to 480 hours, or by restriction of liberty for a term of up to three years, or by compulsory labour for a term of up to five years.The same deed committed in respect of the person who has reached twelve years of age but has not reached fourteen years of age - shall be punishable with deprivation of freedom for a term of three to eight years with or without deprivation of the right to hold certain posts.
  • Chapter 25, Criminal Code. Article 240. Attraction to Prostitution. States that anyone who attracts a person to prostitution or forces someone to continue prostitution will be punished by a fine of up to 200,000 Rubles, one year’s salary or by deprivation or restriction of liberty for up to two years. The sentence will increase to deprivation of liberty for up to six years in the following cases: where violence or threat of violence was used; where the victim was moved across the borders of the Russian Federation or where the crime was committed by a group of people. The Article also states that where the crime was committed by an organized group or where the victim was a minor, the offender will be liable to an increased sentence of imprisonment for between three and eight years.
  • Chapter 25, Criminal Code. Article 241. Organization of Prostitution. This Article states that organizing prostitution or maintaining premises for prostitution is unlawful and is punishable by a fine of between 100,000 to 500,000 Rubles, between one year’s to three years’ salary, restriction of liberty for up to three years or by deprivation of liberty for up to five years. The Article also states that if the offense was committed against a minor, the punishment will be increased to imprisonment for up to six years. Where the minor victim is under the age of fourteen, the offender will be liable to a term of imprisonment for between three to ten years.
  • Chapter 25, Criminal Code. Article 242. Illegal Making and Distribution of Pornographic Material or Objects. This Article states that Illegal making and/or movement across the State Border of the Russian Federation for the purpose of distribution, public demonstration or advertising, or distribution, public demonstration or advertising of pornographic materials or objects, - shall be punishable with a fine or by compulsory labor for a term of up to two years, or by deprivation of liberty for the same term. As well as distribution, public demonstration or advertising of pornographic materials or objects to minors, or involvement of minors in distribution of pornographic materials effected by a person who has reached eighteen years of age - shall be punishable by deprivation of liberty for a term of two to five years.
  • Chapter 25, Criminal Code. Article 242.1. Making and Distribution of Materials or Objects with Pornographic Pictures of Minors. This Article states that it is unlawful for an adult to make, keep or move across the state border of the Russian Federation pornographic images, materials or articles depicting minors for the purpose of dissemination, public showing or advertising. It is also unlawful to use minors as performers in entertainment events of a pornographic nature. The offender is liable to a term of imprisonment of up to six years. An increased sentence of imprisonment of between three and eight years applies if the offense is committed by a group of people or an organized group; by a parent or guardian, teacher or employee working for an educational or pedagogical institution; where the victim is under the age of fourteen.
  • Chapter 25, Criminal Code. Article 242.2. Using a Minor for the Purpose of Making Pornographic Materials or Objects. The Article states that making photos, films or videotapes showing a minor for the purpose of making and/or distributing pornographic materials or objects, or attracting a minor as a performer in an entertainment of pornographic nature by a person who has reached eighteen years of age - shall be punishable by deprivation of liberty for a term of three to ten years.
  • Chapter 28, Criminal Code. Article 272. Illegal Access to Computer Information. The Article states that illegal access to legally-protected computer information, if this deed has involved the destruction, blocking, modification or copying of computer information, - shall be punishable with a fine in the amount of up to 200 thousand rubles.
  • Chapter 28, Criminal Code. Article 273. Creation, Use, and Dissemination of Harmful Computer Programs. The Article states that creation, dissemination or use of computer programs or other computer information, which are knowingly intended for unsanctioned destruction, blocking, modification or copying of computer information or for balancing-out of computer information security facilities - shall be punishable by restraint of liberty for a term of up to four years.

2008 - The Safer Internet Center-Russia, member of INHOPE since 2009, launched a hotline where internet users can report illegal or harmful material on the web, including child sexual abuse material. In addition to reports of possible child sexual abuse material, the hotline performs checks on possible missing children and receives concerns about racism/hate speech, bullying, and substance abuse. In 2014, since its inception in 2008, the hotline has received almost 16,000 reports, in total more than 53,000 reports regarding possible child sexual abuse material since its launch.

2009 - The Friendly Runet Foundation, active member of the INHOPE association of global hotlines, is a provider of hotline services where Internet users can report instances of possible child sexual abuse material and other online illegal content. In addition to hotline services, the Foundation works closely with Internet Service Providers, law enforcement, and government to support issue based research and encourage policy development. In 2014, the hotline has received close to 38,000 reports, in total 177,000 reports has been received since its launched .

2011 - Three main cell phone providers in Russia, VimpelCom, TeleSystems and Megafon, together with the state telecom company Rostelecom, launched the Internet Safety League (STI) in Moscow, whose board includes Russia’s Communications and Press Minister Igor Shchyogolev. Volunteers are asked to monitor the Internet and report child pornography content. The league’s purpose will be extended to police other negative content in the coming years. The Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) held a three-day regional training seminar in Lithuania on sexual abuse of children on the Internet, which was attended by several representatives from Russian. The aim of the conference was for the countries, attending the seminar, to share their current situation of online child sexual exploitation and offer assistance and suggestions of improvement for law enforcement officials. At the first gathering of the Child Protection Sub–Working Group of the US-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission (BPC), established in 2009 by Presidents Obama and Medvedev, the United States and Russia met to discuss cooperative strategy regarding the rapid spread of child pornography in their countries.

2012 - Russian Ministry of Communication created “Clean Internet”, which stands for the Center for Protection of Rights and Legal Interests of Citizens in the Digital Sphere to develop mechanisms that regulate distribution of illegal content on RuNet and create a positive online environment. RuNet users can also report computer incidents through the Cyber Security and Incident Response Team for the governmental networks of the Russian Federation (GOV-CERT.RU. The Safer Internet Center – Russia became the base for the Russian National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, which has been operated by a non-profit organization ROCIT, works with support from law enforcement, the Internet and communications industry, and government policy makers. The organization offers outreach and training to communities, families, and child protection professionals, direct victim support, victim identification, and contributes to issue based research and policy development.

2014 - A draft for Russia’s Cyber Security Strategy is underway. Russian NGO Stellit has been implementing a project in Russia that was launched internationally by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. The project aims to reduce violence against children, particularly sexual exploitation of children and sexual tourism.

2015 - Safer Internet League introduced an internet filter that blocks content not appropriate for children for millions internet users in Russian. Russian government imposed stricter environment on in Internet search engines. The Russian government has the authority to shut down websites containing information deemed harmful to children. In addition to child pornography, this policy covers web content on suicide, drugs, and homosexuality. Yandex, a Russian search engine, provides option to apply filter that blocks any adult content websites that considered inappropriate for children.

2016 - Every year since 2010, the Safe Internet League organized the Safe Internet Forum, which is a conference on online child and adult safety. The Forum is supported by the Ministry of Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation, the State Duma Committee on Family, Women, and Children, and the Interior Ministry of the Russian Federation. The 2016 forum will focus on Russia-China ICT Development & Security. Stellit, in coordination with the Nobody’s Children Foundation - Poland, ECPAT Norway, Caritas Lithuania, launched a project that aimed at prevention of commercial sexual exploitation of children in the Baltic Sea region.