Norway

Population

5,207,689

Population 0‑18

18.1%

Internet Users

96.3%

Facebook Users

3,200,000

Mobile Subscribers

6,400,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2001 - The Norwegian Media Authority (NMA) implemented Plan of Action – Children, Young People and the Internet, which focused on the online sexual abuse and exploitation of children, and promoted a safe and responsible use of new ICT. NMA launched Safety and Awareness for Teens – SAFT program (now the Safe Use Project (Trygg Bruk-Prosjektet)) that was developed in the framework of European Commission’s Safer Internet Program (Better Internet for Kids). The activities of the project are carried out in collaboration with a large national network of partners consisting of government, NGOs, ICT industry and representatives from teachers, colleges and universities focusing on children’s use of the Internet.

2004 - The Ministry of Education and Research (MER) implemented its Program for Digital Competence, a strategy focused on infrastructure, competence development, curricula and digital teaching resources to facilitate digital competence for all. The program was divided into four main focus areas to be achieved by 2008: an improved infrastructure and high-quality technical equipment, enhancement of R&D in the field, development of digital learning and teaching resources.

2006 - Through its Knowledge Promotion (Norwegian National Curriculum) Reform, Norway became the first European country to link digital skills with subject-related goals in its national curriculum. The Reform defined digital competence as one of the basic skill along with oral, reading, writing, and numeracy, it focused on investing in equipment, providing supplementary ICT training for teachers, implementing ICT in all school subjects, and training on the safe use of ICT.

2007 - A joint campaign between the Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education and the Norwegian Data Protection Authority launched Du bestemmer (You Decide), a teaching resource about privacy and digital responsibility for children from 9 to 18 years old. The campaign has been growing both in content and number of users and has been translated and implemented in more than 20 countries across Europe and North America.

The same year, SchoolNet ran an online resource called Ett klikk for mye?(One click too much), which educated Internet users about the offense and what young people can do if they have been violated on the Internet. It dealt with online violations of the law, teaching students which legislation applies to their online activities, and offered advice to those who have experienced online violence.

An educational portal Ovttas was established as part of the objective to upgrade learning resources in the Knowledge Promotion reform in 2007. The portal was developed in three Sami languages and Norwegian, it provides a complete and searchable overview of Sami teaching resources, shares images, books, films, audio files and articles on themes related to teaching, as well as pedagogical tips. Additionally, a digital learning resource portal, the National Digital Learning Arena (NDLA), was established in collaboration between eighteen county authorities. It provides learning resources, freely available to all, for several central subjects in upper secondary school.

2008 - To improve schools’ ICT standards, Norway launched Skolementor (School Mentor), which was created based on the British self-review framework. Through this online tool, schools can evaluate their achievements and status within six areas of ICT: administration and framework conditions, school resources, mapping and planning, digital competence, pedagogical practice, organisation. From 2012 to 2015, the Skolementor provided Larermentor (Teacher Mentor), an online tool where teachers were able to evaluate their digital literacy.

2009 - Telenor, Cross My Heart, and Barnevakten together launched Bruk Hue (Use Your Head) campaign, which is the largest school tour against cyberbullying. Since its establishment, the-tour visited 700 schools and talked to 200,000 children and 40,000 parents about cyberbullying and netiquette. The campaign is supported by many Norwegian athletes and artists, including Annsofie Pettersen, who has written a song (Don’t slaughter me) that talks about her experience of being harassed online.

The same year, two Norwegian broadcasting companies, NRK and TV2 created digital content for the education sector. NRK (Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) portal provides historical and contemporary video and audio clips that linked to curriculum goals for student and teachers in primary and secondary education. The TV2 School provides digital teaching aids for primary, secondary, and adult education.

From 2009 to 2012, Norway participated in European Schoolnet Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) project, eQNet, where it shared its digital learning resources with other European countries.

2012 - The Ministry of Education and Research adopted a Quality through Competency: A Strategy for Continuous Professional Development for Teachers (2012–2015). The strategy aimed to increase the number of teachers who have up to sixty credits of didactical competence in a certain subject. Teachers can apply to seventy-four different courses at twenty-five different universities and colleges.

The same year, the Norwegian Government introduced a national test for assessing ICT-skills for all students in the fourth grade. The students are tested in digital judgment, digital production, digital communication and the use of standard software.

Through iTEC (Innovative Technologies for Engaging Classrooms), which ran from 2010 to 2014, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research collaborated with European Schoolnet, technology providers, and research organisations to transform the way that technology is used in schools. Over the course of the project, educational tools and resources were implemented in over 2,500 classrooms across 20 European countries.

2013 - After assuming responsibility for the day-care sector in 2012, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research implemented a new general plan and national guidelines for pre-school education. In its kindergarten program, the Norwegian Center for ICT in Education promotes digital literacy both in kindergarten and in pre-school education. The program uses ICT in a playful, stimulating, and safe way within the tasks defined by the general plan.

2016 - The Norwegian Media Authority, together with Cross My Heart (Helpline), NorSIS, Save the Children, and the Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education organised Safer Internet Day in Norway. The event focused on #hvagjørdu (#whatcanyoudo) so that the internet is a better and safer place for children and teenagers. The organisation conducted several workshops that discussed netiquette, digital judgement, gaming, digital bullying, personal security and growing up in a digital world.

Each year eTwinning, a free online education service network for teachers and students in 42 countries, sponsors a number of seminars and conferences around Europe. The seminars are a combination of professional expertise, training in the use of eTwinning Portal, networking and socializing. In June, eTwinning Norway held a seminar on creative use of ICT in kindergarten.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Europe

The ITU is is the UN agency for ICTs. Areas of focus in Europe include improving E-accessibility in Central and Eastern Europe, transitioning Europe to digital broadcasting, and sharing best practices for implementing e-applications.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online: Norway (2014)

European Commission

Report on Norway's commitment to stop Child Sexual Abuse Online

Making Use of ICT: Glimpses from Norwegian Teacher Practices (2014)

Barbara Wasson, Cecilie Hansen

This paper presents the Norwegian results of a baseline study of teacher practices with ICT. Through semi-structured interviews, six Norwegian teachers explain how digital technology not only changed aspects of their planning and classroom teaching, but also assessment and feedback.

Mapping Safer Internet Policies in the Member States (2014)

P. Baudouin, B. Mahieu, T. Dor, B. Good, J. Milayi, S. Nakajima

The purpose of the study was to set up a framework for analysing Better Internet for Children public policies covering EU Member States, and Norway and Iceland.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

Policy Influences and Country Clusters: A Comparative Analysis of Internet Safety Policy Implementation (2014)

B. O'Neill

The report examines the policy context of internet safety and looks at how countries within each cluster approach implementation.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Country classification: opportunities, risks, harm and parental mediation (2013)

Helsper, E.J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B., and de Haan, J.

This report explores the range and type of online opportunities and risks experienced by children in each country. The ways in which parents mediate or regulate their children’s internet use is also examined.

Country Report on ICT in Education: Norway (2013)

European SchoolNet

This report provides starus of implementation of ICT in Norway's educaion system.

In their own words: what bothers children online? (2013)

Livingstone S., Kirwil, L., Ponte C. and Staksrud E., with the EU Kids Online network

The results of a survey of nearly 10,000 children in 25 countries across Europe, this report details what children say upsets them and their friends online

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation (2013)

Helsper, E. J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B. and De Haan, J. with members of the EU Kids Online network

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Overview and Analysis of 1:1 Learning Initiatives in Europe (2013)

Intel

Intel 's report on the status of 1:1 Learning Initiative in Europe

Media Literacy in Europe: 12 Good Practices that will Inspire You (2013)

Evens Foundation

This document explores 12 cases across Europe of media literacy.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

EU Kids Online: Excessive Internet Use among European Children (2012)

Smahel, D, Helsper, E, Green, L, Kalmus, V, Blinka, L, Ólafsson, K,

This report uses the data from the EU Kids Online study to examine excessive use of the Internet by children in the 25 participating countries.

Excessive Internet Use by European Children (2012)

D. Smahel, E. Helsper, L. Green, V. Kalmus, L. Blinka, K. Ólafsson

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey. (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

The Protection of Children Online (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

ECPAT Global Monitoring Report: Norway (2012)

ECPAT

Report on the status of action against commercial sexual exploitation of children in Norway

Risks and safety on the internet: The perspective of European children. Full Findings (2011)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., Ólafsson, K

Building on the original study, EU Kids Online I, this second piece of research includes the findings from research which took place in 25 countries. Children in the 9 – 16 age group were surveyed on their experiences of online use, risk and safety

EU Kids Online: Final report (2009)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L.

One of the foremost pieces of research into the online habits of children in the European Union is the EU Kids Online research, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Plus Programme between 2006 and 2009.

Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe (2009)

Eurydice

The study covers 30 European countries and provides information on whether online safety is taught and how it is taught in schools within the participating countries.

E-learning Nordic 2006 - Impact of ICT on Education (2006)

The Nordic Ministries of Education and Ramboll Managements

The study focuses on the impact of ICT in education in three key areas: pupils’ performance; teaching and learning processes; knowledge-sharing, communication and home-school co-operation. More than 8000 persons from Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark participated in the study.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of simple majority in Norway is eighteen. The age of consent for sexual activity is sixteen and the age of consent for marriage is eighteen.

In Norway’s legislation, any contact with child sexual abuse material is prohibited by law, including computer generated, morphed images, drawings and in some instances, text are included – as long as the content sexualizes children.

2008 - A requirement of universal design of information and communication technology came into force by the Anti-Discrimination and Accessibility Act, which is stated in Section 11 of the Act. New ICT solutions applies to technology and systems that are to be made available to the general public that support the undertaking normal functions. The obligation does not apply to ICT solutions whose design is regulated by other legislation.

In Norway, privacy protected by the Personal Data Act. In addition to Penal Code, anyone who publishes pictures or other personal information online must also deal with the Personal Data Act.

Norway has signed, ratified and entered into law the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (October 2006).

  • Section 190a, Penal Code. This section states that a fine or imprisonment not exceeding two years shall be imposed on unjustified take possession of someone else’s identity document or act with another person’s identity or an identity that is easy to confuse with someone else’s identity, with intent to obtain an unlawful gain for himself or another, or inflict another loss or disadvantage.
  • Section 192, Penal Code. This section states that anyone who commits a sexual act by means of violence or threats, or with a person who is unconscious or incapable of resisting the act, or by means of violence or threats compels any person to engage in a sexual act with another person, or to carry out similar acts with himself or herself, is guilty of the offense termed rape. The offender is liable to imprisonment for up to ten years. The section also states that importance should be attached to whether the victim was under the age of fourteen in deciding whether the offense made use of violence or threats or whether the victim was incapable of resisting. The minimum penalty will be two years’ imprisonment if the act consisted of sexual intercourse, or if the offender had rendered the victim in a helpless state in order to commit the act. The maximum penalty will be increased to 21 years’ imprisonment in the following aggravating circumstances: the rape was committed jointly by two or more persons; the rape was committed in a particularly painful or offensive manner; the offender has previously been convicted for rape or sexual intercourse with a child under the age of fourteen (Section 195); or the victim dies, sustains considerable injury to body or health, or an infectious disease as a result of the offense. The section also states that anyone who is guilty of rape through gross negligence is liable to imprisonment for up to five years. In the aggravating circumstances mentioned above, the penalty will be increased to up to eight years’ imprisonment.
  • Section 195, Penal Code. Defines the offense of engaging in sexual activity with a child under the age of fourteen. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to ten years. Where the activity was sexual intercourse a minimum penalty of two years’ imprisonment will apply. The penalty will be imprisonment for up to 21 years if the offense was committed jointly by more than one person; the act was committed in a particularly painful or offensive manner; the offender has previously been convicted for sexual intercourse with a child under the age of fourteen or for rape (Section 192); or the victim dies, sustains considerable injury to body or health, or an infectious disease as a result of the offense. Criminal liability shall not be excluded by any mistake made as regards age. A penalty below the minimum prescribed in this section may be imposed where the offender is of about equal age and development as the victim.
  • Section 196, Penal Code. States that it is a criminal offense to engage in sexual activity with a child under the age of sixteen. The penalty is imprisonment for up to five years. This will be increased to up to fifteen years’ imprisonment the offense was committed jointly by more than one person; the act was committed in a particularly painful or offensive manner; the offender has previously been convicted for or sexual intercourse with a child under the age of fourteen (Section 195) or sixteen, or for rape (Section 192); or the victim dies, sustains considerable injury to body or health, or an infectious disease as a result of the offense. Criminal liability shall not be excluded by any mistake made as regards age, unless there is no element of negligence in this respect. The offender might not be penalized if he/she is of about equal age and development as the victim.
  • Section 200, Penal Code. This section states that it is an offense to commit a sexual act with a person without their consent. The penalty is imprisonment for up to one year. Where the victim is a child under the age of sixteen, an increased penalty of up to three years’ imprisonment will apply. This may be further increased to up to six years’ imprisonment of the act has been committed under especially aggravating circumstances. In deciding whether especially aggravating circumstances subsist, particular importance shall be attached to how long the relationship has endured, whether the act is a misuse of a blood relationship, care relationship, position, or relationship of dependence or close trust, and whether the act has been committed in a particularly painful or offensive manner. The section also states that anyone who misleads a child under sixteen years of age to behave in a sexually offensive or otherwise indecent manner (as referred to in Section 201) will be liable to up to three years’ imprisonment. Criminal liability shall not be excluded by any mistake made as regards age, unless there is no element of negligence in this respect. The offender might not be penalized if he/she is of about equal age and development as the victim.
  • Section 201, Penal Code. States that anyone who, by word or deed, behaves in a sexually offensive or otherwise indecent manner in a public place; in the presence of or towards any person who has not consented thereto; or in the presence of or towards children under the age of sixteen, will be liable to fines or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.
  • Section 201a, Penal Code. States that any person who has agreed to meet a child under the age of 16, who with intent to commit an act as mentioned in sections 195, 196 or 200 second paragraph has arrived at the meeting place or place from which the meeting place can be observed shall be liable to fines or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year. Criminal liability shall not be excluded by any mistake made as regards age, unless there is no element of negligence in this respect. A penalty pursuant to this provision may be remitted if those who have agreed to meet are about equal as regards age and development.
  • Section 202, Penal Code. Defines the offense of promoting the engagement in prostitution, or letting premises for the purpose of prostitution. The offender is liable to fines or to imprisonment for up to five years. In addition, the section states that it is an offense to offer, arrange or ask for prostitution in a public announcement, punishable by imprisonment for up to six months.
  • Section 202a, Penal Code. States that anyone who procures sexual activity or a sexual act by providing or agreeing on payment, obtains sexual activity or a sexual act by such payment being agreed on or provided by another person, or gets a person to perform acts on himself or herself that correspond to sexual activity shall be liable to fines or imprisonment not exceeding six months or both. If the sexual activity or sexual act is committed in a particularly offensive manner, without the act being punishable pursuant to other provisions, the punishment shall be imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year
  • Section 203, Penal Code. This section states that anyone who, for payment, engages in sexual activity or commits a sexual act with a person under the age of eighteen is liable to fines or imprisonment for up to two years. Criminal liability shall not be excluded by any mistake made as regards age unless it is made in good faith without negligence.
  • Section 204, Penal Code. Defines pornography as sexual depictions that seem offensive or are in any other way likely to have a humanly degrading or corrupting effect, including sexual depictions involving the use of corpses, animals, violence and duress. Sexual depictions that must be regarded as justifiable for artistic, scientific, informational or similar purposes are not regarded as pornographic. The section imposes a penalty of imprisonment for up to three years or fines for anyone who publishes, sells or in any other way attempts to disseminate pornography; imports pornography with intent to disseminate it; delivers pornography to persons under eighteen years of age; gives a public lecture or arranges a public performance or exhibition of a pornographic nature. The section also states that any person who negligently commits any act referred to above will be liable to fines or imprisonment for up to six months. The same penalty applies to any proprietor or superior who willfully or negligently fails to prevent the commission in any activity of any act referred to above. This section does not apply to any film the Norwegian Media Authority has by prior control approved for commercial exhibition or sale.
  • Section 204a, Penal Code. This sections imposes a penalty of imprisonment for up to three years or a fine for anyone who produces, procures, imports, possesses, delivers to another person or for payment or systematically acquaints himself with any presentation of sexual abuse of children or any presentation of a sexual nature that involves children. The same penalty applies to anyone who concerns himself with presentations of sexual abuse of children or presentations of a sexual nature that involve children in any other way as referred to in Section 204, or induces a child under the age of eighteen to allow pictures of himself or herself to be taken as part of a commercial presentation of moving or non-moving pictures of a sexual nature, or who produces such presentations depicting any person under eighteen. Where the offense has been committed negligently, the offender will be liable to fines or imprisonment for up to six months. The same penalty applies to any proprietor or superior who willfully or negligently fails to prevent the commission in any activity of any act referred to above. The section also states that the penalty may be remitted in the case of any person who takes and possesses a picture of a person who is between the ages of sixteen and eighteen if the latter has consented thereto and both of them are about equal in age and development.
  • Section 205, Penal Code. States that any penal provision in this chapter will also apply to anyone who aids and abets the offense.
  • Section 222, Penal Code. This section states that any person who by unlawful conduct or by any threat thereof compels another person to do, submit to, or omit to do anything, or who aids and abets thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. Any person who by force, deprivation of liberty, improper pressure or any other unlawful conduct or by threats of such conduct forces anyone to enter into a marriage shall be guilty of causing a forced marriage. The penalty for causing a forced marriage is imprisonment for a term not exceeding six years. Any person who aids and abets such an offence shall be liable to the same penalty. Any person who by threatening to make an accusation or report of a criminal act or to make a defamatory allegation unlawfully compels another person to do, submit to, or omit to do anything, or who aids and abets thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.
  • Section 227, Penal Code. This section states that any person who by word or deed threatens to commit a criminal act that is subject to a more severe penalty than detention for one year or imprisonment for six months, under such circumstances that the threat is likely to cause serious fear, or who aids and abets such threat, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years.
  • Section 228, Penal Code. This section states that any person who commits violence against the person of another or otherwise assails him bodily, or who aids and abets thereto, is guilty of assault and shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months. If the assault causes injury to body or health or considerable pain, imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years may be imposed, but not exceeding five years if death or considerable injury results.
  • Section 246, Penal Code. This section states that any person who by word or deed unlawfully defames another person, or who aids and abets thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months.
  • Section 247, Penal Code. This section states that any person who by word or deed behaves in a manner that is likely to harm another person’s good name and reputation or to expose him to hatred, contempt, or loss of the confidence necessary for his position or business, or who aids and abets thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year. If the defamation is committed in print or in broadcasting or otherwise under especially aggravating circumstances, imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years may be imposed.
  • Section 390, Penal Code. This section states that any person who violates another person’s privacy by giving public information about personal or domestic relations shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months.

2004 - In partnership with Norwegian Criminal Investigation Service (NCIS), Telenor has developed Child Sexual Abuse Anti Distribution Filter, which blocks websites that considered illegal by Kripos.

2005 - The Norwegian Red Cross began operating Kors på halsen (Cross my Heart) national helpline for issues related to children’s safe use of the internet and mobile devices. In 2010, the hotline became the official Norwegian INSAFE helpline where children and young people under 18 can talk about their digital life experiences and receive advice, counselling and support.

2008 - Norway joined the Nordic’s campaign against child pornography, which includes a closer police co-operation through joint training about sexual abuse and child pornography, a new Nordic project to develop software and technology for use in online investigations,and the setting up of a joint distribution server to disseminate technical information about images of abuse.

In addition to operating the hotline, KRIPOS (Norwegian National Criminal Investigation Service) launched a red button service to prevent grooming and make it easier for children, young people and the general public to report any Internet related offences, including sexual exploitation of children, human trafficking, and racism. A red button ‘Politi” icon is provided on many popular children and young people’s websites; when used, it directly reports to the KRIPOS’s hotline. In 2011, the hotline received 2,338 tips, of which 1,355 were related to sexual exploitation of children. NCIS works closely with providers of “child websites”, who routinely use the hotline to report what they believe are adults trying to groom children etc.

2010 - The Norwegian Center for Information Security (NorSIS) launched Slettmeg.no (deleteme.no) to provide support service to people who experience privacy violations online. It offers advice and guidance to people of all ages who find offending material about themselves on the Internet.

2012 - Norway joined the Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online along with 54 countries around the world. The Alliance unites Ministers of the Interior and of Justice from each country to fight against Child Sexual Abuse Online, to rescue victims, to develop more effective prosecution, and to reduce the amount of child sexual abuse images available online.

2015 - Officer from KIPROS participated in the 16th Europol training course on “Combating the Sexual Exploitation of Children on the Internet” (COSEC), which was held in Germany .This ten-day course provided training for 63 representatives from EU Member States, non-EU States, and Interpol.