Nigeria

Population

181,562,056

Population 0‑14

43.0%

Internet Users

51.1%

Facebook Users

15,000,000

Mobile Subscribers

151,200,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2007 - The Ministry of Education developed a 10 Year Strategy Plan which lists 100% computer literacy for teachers across all levels of education through the development of training programs and certification as one of the main goals for ICT. Further objectives are the incorporation of ICT into the curriculum for students of all ages, as well as investment in affordable computers and training of staff. Over 80 schools have benefited from the Zenith Bank’s ICT for Youth Empowerment initiative, which focuses on assisting Nigerian youth to bridge the digital divide through early introduction to ICT.

2010 - Nigeria’s National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) launched ICT4D Strategic Action Plan to achieve the vision of making Nigeria one of the top 20 economies in the world, by year 2020 through the development of an information and knowledge-based economy and society. In the education sector, the ICT4D plan entails eleven programs, 44 implementation strategies, 32 plan actions, and 106 measurable targets. The programs include the promotion and facilitation of teachers training; the implementation of a compulsory E-curriculum portal (launched 2014); the procurement, installation, operation and maintenance of ICT equipment and software. Ericsson, Earth Institute at Columbia University, and Millennium Promise have launched the ‘Connect to Learn’ initiative to address some of the challenges relating to secondary education access and quality, particularly among the girls, by providing scholarships and bringing ICT to schools in remote, resource-poor parts around the world, including NIgeria, over mobile broadband.

2011 - Ministry of Communication Technology was created to facilitate universal, ubiquitous and cost effective access to communications infrastructure throughout the country, to promote the development of the ICT industry, to increase the contribution of the ICT industry to GDP, and to utilize ICT to drive transparency in governance and improve the quality and cost effectiveness of public service. The Ministry is also incharge of the implementation of Nigeria’s National Broadband Plan 2013 - 2018. Through their Badiliko project, the British Council and Microsoft are working together to introduce ICT to children across Africa. The project aims give teachers, students and the wider community access to ICT, as well as professional development training for teachers. Currently, the project has trained over 20,000 educators and set up 80 digital hubs in six countries, including Nigeria.

2012 - National ICT Policy reiterates the importance of integrating ICT into the education system in order to transform the Republic into a knowledge-based economy. ICT is envisaged to be integrated into the national education curriculum, whilst lifelong learning and the development of skilled ICT personnel will both be promoted. In his press conference, President Goodluck Jonathan promised that by 2017, ICT will be incorporated in syllabus starting in primary level and increase of the broadband penetration across the country. Passnownow.com was launched to support children in secondary schools by providing curriculum-based test preparation materials at no charge. Co-Creation Hub Nigeria (CcHub) launches Efiko is a mobile social, self-learning, and assessment platform tied to the school curriculum and designed to stimulate and personalize the learning experience outside of school.

2013 - GidiMobile Ltd. launched gidimo, a downloadable learning and lifestyle app that provides rich content such as past examination questions and study guides (based on the Nigerian education curriculum) to learners free of charge. Projects for all launched Hello World in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. The project provides isolated and vulnerable communities with educational content and Internet through Hello Hubs, an outdoor solar-powered and Internet-enabled computer stations.

2014 - Diamond Bank Nigeria has partnered with Paradigm Initiative Nigeria (PIN) to connect underserved youths of Abia State with Aba L.I.F.E (Life Skills. ICT. Financial Readiness and Entrepreneurship.), which provides young people training in ICT, entrepreneurship and life skills. Through the Hope for Children initiative, Samsung Electronics has launched the Solar Powered Internet Schools (SPIS) in Nigeria, Samsung hopes to reach 2.5 million learners across the continent in five years. Worldreader has launched its E-Reader Program where it provides e-readers and e-books to schools, libraries, and communities in Ghana that come with training and technical support. In partnership with USAID, Intel, World Pulse, World Vision, UN Women, and Women in Technology Nigeria, NetHope launched the Women and the Web Alliance at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. The alliance seeks to close the Internet gender gap by bringing more than 600,000 young women online in Kenya and Nigeria in the next three years.

2015 - Every year, Nigeria National Internet Governance Forum (NIGF) aims to provide a sustainable National Forum and structure that engages industry, government, lawmaker, the academia, civil society and all Stakeholders in a strategic national debate on internet governance” The NIGF 2015 called on the participants for national contributions towards empowering Nigerian youth, emerging sustainable development issues, and connecting the next billion. The Nigeria Women in Information Technology (NIWIIT) organised the 2015 Girls in ICT Day Event to raise empowering and encouraging girls and young women to consider studies and careers in ICT. As of December 1st, Youth for Technology Foundation (YTF) has impacted over a million youth and women and supported over 3000 communities. In Nigeria, YTF established Community Technology and Learning Center (CTLC) and the Owerri Digital Village (ODV) to help in integration of technology in a way that brings out the positive potential for the youth and encourages to bring stability, sustainability and meaningful life experiences to communities. Bridge International Academies, the world’s largest education company that uses a technology-enabled approach to provide standardized primary education, has opened two low-cost private schools in Nigeria. The National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) hosted eNigeria Summit, an annual information Technology (IT) summit for creation of ICT awareness, development of framework and goals for best practices to position Nigeria in the global information society.

2016 - Co-Creation Hub Nigeria (CcHub) launched re:learn edtech initiative, which is an open living lab that focuses on learning and the smart application of technology in schools.

Africa Child Online Protection Education & Awareness Center (ACOPEA)

The center focuses on education and awareness across Africa and the provision of mechanisms to report abuse and protect the rights of citizens in cyberspace.

Co-Creation Hub Nigeria

A social innovation center that focuses on accelerating the application of social capital and technology for economic prosperity.

Federal Ministry of Communications Technology

The Ministry fosters a knowledge based economy and information society in Nigeria and to facilitates ICT as a key tool in the transformation agenda in the areas of job creation, economic growth and transparency of governance.

Federal Ministry of Education

The Ministry is responsible for laying down national policies and guidelines for uniform standards for all levels of education in Nigeria as laid out in various statutory document, notably the National Policy on Education, the Education Decree No. 16 of 1985 and the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

iEARN Nigeria

An international non-profit organization that leads a national drive for training trainers, professional development of teachers/ educators and curriculum development (for ICTs in secondary education) thus preparing the country for true education in the 21st century.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

ISPCAN

The International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, multidisciplinary international organization that brings together a worldwide cross-section of committed professionals to work toward the prevention and treatment of child abuse, neglect and exploitation globally.

ITU Development Sector, Africa

ITU-D fosters international cooperation and solidarity in the delivery of technical assistance and in the creation, development and improvement of telecommunication and ICT equipment and networks in developing countries.

National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA)

The National Information Technology Development Agency is responsible for public sector IT projects in Nigeria.

NEPAD e-Africa Commission: e-Schools Project

The e-Schools initiative is currently operating in several African nations, including Ghana. The aim of the project is to provide students in both primary and secondary education with ICT skills and knowledge which will enable them to participate in the emerging Information Society and Knowledge Economy.

NetHope

The non-profit is a catalyst for productive collaboration, innovation, and problem-solving to create and deploy powerful, world-changing information and communication technology (ICT) solutions to those in need.

Nigeria Computer Emergency Response Team (ngCERT)

The National CERT for Nigeria which is domiciled in the Office of the National Security Adviser, was established to promote the philosophy of cybersecurity research initiatives in Nigeria.

One Laptop per Child (OLPC)

A nonprofit organization launched by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, whose aim to empower the world’s poorest children through education by providing a low cost laptops.

Paradigm Initiative Nigeria (PIN)

PIN partners with government, corporate and non-government entities to deliver ICT-related projects throughout Nigeria. One of its projects is the Internet Safety, Security and Privacy Initiative for Nigeria (ISSPIN) which is an annual program of workshops in schools and teaching safe online behavior to youth in general.

Passnownow.com

A social interaction website that supports learning by providing curriculum-based test preparation materials to users at no charge in Nigeria.

Plan Nigeria

Nonprofit organization that helps vulnerable children in Nigeria to access their rights to health, quality education and a sustainable future since 2014.

SchoolNet Nigeria

A non-profit organisation created to address the use of ICT in Nigerian secondary schools, it’s initiative is to mobilise Nigeria’s human and financial resources for the purpose of using ICTs in education.

Women in Technology Nigeria (WITHIN)

The organization provides networking, entrepreneurship and professional development opportunities for women, through technology. It educates, inspires and equips young people, especially girls to pursue and retain careers in STEM, while embracing the emerging tech market as inventors and innovators.

Worldleader

A non-profit organisation whose mission is to bring digital books to every child and her family, so that they can improve their lives.

Youth Crime Watch of Nigeria (YCW)

An NGO that operates in Special Consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. It is involved in a range of school programs and outreach to prevent all kinds of youth crime, including cybercrime and ICT use. YCW was also responsible for the Secure Africa 2012 Conference, at which cybercrime was a feature.

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Education in Sub-Saharan Africa (2015)

Peter Wallet

This document presents the current status of the Information and communication technologies in Education in the Sub-Saharan region.

Overview of Nigeria Cybersecurity Readiness (2015)

Segun H. Olugbile

This paper presents the challenges confronting Nigerian women and children within the context of cyberspace (Internet) and global and national response through implementation of cyber security measures towards addressing these challenges.

The Impacts (Positive and Negative) of ICT on Education in Nigeria (2014)

Israel B. Olaore

This paper examines the positive and negative impact of ICT on education

ECPAT Global Monitoring: Nigeria (2014)

ECPAT

Status of action against commercial sexual exploitation of children in Nigeria

Nigeria Contribution to ITU Council Working Group on Child Online Protection (2014)

ITU

Report on the iniciative that Nigeria is implementing to promote safer internet for the children.

Children’s Rights in the Digital Age (2014)

A. Third, D. Bellerose, U. Dawkins, E. Keltie, K. Pihl

This study found unequal access to digital media among youth from 16 countries, among other key findings on children's digital usage.

Education and Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Nigerian Educational System: The Journey So Far (2013)

Johnny O. Ogunji

Status of implmentation of ICT in Nigerian educaiton system as of 2013

Understanding what is happening in ICT in Nigeria (2012)

Fola Odufuwa

The report determines the state of information and communication technologies (ICTs), particularly telecommunications, in Nigeria through survey interviews with households, individuals and informal businesses focussed on understanding how technology products and services are being accessed and used.

Application of ICTs in Nigerian Secondary Schools (2010)

Esharenana E. Adomi

This report is on the status of ICT in Nigerian secondar schools

ICT in Education in Nigeria (2007)

Osei Tutu Agyeman

This report is on the initiatives that Nigeria is undertaking to implement ICT in Education

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of simple majority in Nigeria is eighteen. The age of consent for sexual activity and the age of consent for marriage is eighteen.

  • Section 214, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Offences Against Morality. States that anyone who has anal intercourse with a person or permits a male to have such intercourse with him/her is guilty of a felony and liable to imprisonment for fourteen years.
  • Section 215, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Attempt to Commit Unnatural Offenses. This section states that anyone who attempts to have anal intercourse with a person is guilty of a felony and liable to imprisonment for seven years.
  • Section 216, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Indecent Treatment of Boys under Fourteen. Defines the offense of unlawfully and indecently dealing with a boy under the age of fourteen. This is deemed to be a felony and the offender is liable to imprisonment for seven years. In this section, the term ‘deal with’ includes any act which, if done without consent, would constitute an assault.
  • Section 217, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Indecent Practices between Males. This section states that it is illegal for a male person, whether in public or private, to commit any act of gross indecency with another man, to procure another man to commit any act of gross indecency with him, or to attempt to procure the commission of any such act by any man with himself or with another male person. The offender is guilty of a felony and liable to imprisonment for three years.
  • Section 218, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Defilement of Girls under Thirteen. States that anyone who has sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of thirteen years is guilty of a felony and liable to imprisonment for life, with or without caning. Attempting to have sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of thirteen years is also deemed to be a felony and is punishable by imprisonment for fourteen years, with or without caning.
  • Section 221, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Defilement of Girls under Sixteen and above Thirteen, and of Idiots. Defines the offense of having or attempting to have sexual intercourse with a girl of or above thirteen years and under sixteen years of age; or knowing a woman or girl to be an idiot or imbecile, having or attempting to have sexual intercourse with her. The offender is guilty of a misdemeanor, and will be punished with imprisonment for two years, with or without caning. This section also states that it is a defense to a charge of either of the offenses firstly defined in this section to prove that the offender believed, on reasonable grounds, that the girl was of or above the age of sixteen years.
  • Section 222, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Indecent Treatment of Girls under Sixteen. This section states that anyone who unlawfully and indecently deals with a girl under the age of sixteen is guilty of a misdemeanor, and is liable to imprisonment for two years, with or without caning. Where the victim is under the age of thirteen years, the offender is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years, with or without caning. This section also states that it is a defense to a charge under this section to prove that the offender believed, on reasonable grounds, that the girl was of or above the age of sixteen years. The term ‘deal with’ includes doing any act which, if done without consent, would constitute an assault.
  • Section 222C, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Restriction on Defense of Reasonable Belief. It shall only be a defense to a charge of the first offense defined in Section 221 (defilement of girls under sixteen and above thirteen) and Section 222 (indecent treatment of girls under sixteen) to prove that the offender believed, on reasonable grounds, that the girl was of or above the age of sixteen years if the offender himself was under the age of 21 years at the time of the offense and has not previously been charged with any of such offenses.
  • Section 223, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Procuration. This section states that it is an offense to procure a girl or woman who is under the age of eighteen to have sexual intercourse with another person or persons, to become a common prostitute, or to leave her home or even Nigeria with the intent that she may become a prostitute in a brothel elsewhere, either in Nigeria or outside the country. This misdemeanor is punishable by imprisonment for two years. The section also states that a person cannot be convicted of any of the offenses defined in this section upon the uncorroborated testimony of one witness only.
  • Section 224, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Procuring Defilement of Woman by Threats or Fraud, or Administering Drugs. This section states that it is a misdemeanor to procure or attempt to procure any girl or woman by threat or intimidation, or by false pretense, to have sexual intercourse, either in Nigeria or elsewhere. The offender is liable to imprisonment for two years. The same sentence applies to anyone who applies, administers to, or causes to be taken any drug, matter or thing by a girl or woman, with intent to stupefy or overpower them and hence enable any man to have sexual intercourse with the victim. The section also states no one shall be convicted of an offense under this section upon the uncorroborated testimony of one witness only.
  • Section 225, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Abduction of Girl under Eighteen with Intent to have Carnal Knowledge. States that anyone who, with intent that an unmarried girl under the age of eighteen years may have sexual intercourse with a man, whether a particular man or not, takes her or causes her to be taken out of the custody or protection of her parents or guardian, and against the will of the parent or guardian, is guilty of a misdemeanor and liable to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 225A, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Persons Trading in Prostitution. This section states that any male person who knowingly lives, wholly or in part, on the earnings of prostitution, or persistently solicits or importunes for immoral purposes in any public place, commits an offense and is liable to imprisonment for two years. Subsequent offenses are, in addition to any term of imprisonment, punishable by caning. A person shall be deemed to be knowingly living on the earnings of prostitution if they live with or are habitually in the company of a prostitute, or if they have exercised control, direction or influence over the movements of a prostitute in such manner as to show that the offender is aiding, abetting or compelling the prostitution. This section also states that any female person who is proved to have, for the purposes of gain, exercised control, direction or influence over the movements of a prostitute in such a manner as to show that she is aiding, abetting or compelling her prostitution, will be liable to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 226, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Unlawful Detention with Intent to Defile, or in a Brothel. Defines the offense of detaining a woman or girl against their will in or upon any premises or in a brothel, with the intent that the victim shall have sexual intercourse with a man, whether with any man in particular or generally. This crime is deemed to be a misdemeanor and the offender is liable to imprisonment for up to two years. A person shall be deemed to detain, and compel or induce to remain, a victim in such premises or brothel with the intention of prostituting the victim, where the offender withholds the victim’s personal clothes or property, or where clothes have been lent or otherwise supplied to the victim. The section also states that no legal proceedings shall be taken against any girl or woman for taking away or being found in possession of any such clothes which were necessary to enable the victim to leave such premises or brothel.
  • Section 227, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Conspiracy to Defile. Defines the offense of conspiring with another person to induce any woman or girl, by means of false pretence or other fraudulent means, to permit any man to have sexual intercourse with them. The offender is guilty of a felony and will be punished by imprisonment for three years. Section 231, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Indecent Acts. Defines the offense of willfully and without lawful excuse doing any indecent act in a public place, with or without intent to insult or offend any person. This is classed as a misdemeanor and the offender is liable to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 233, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Knowledge of Age Immaterial. States that, in the case of any of the offenses committed with respect to a woman or girl under a specified age it is irrelevant that the accused person did not know that the woman or girl was under that age, or believed that she was not under that age, except as otherwise expressly stated.
  • Section 233B, Chapter 21A, Criminal Code. Obscene Publications. Defines the term ‘article’ in this chapter, as anything capable of being or likely to be looked at and read or looked at or read, and includes any film or record of a picture or pictures, and any sound records. The term ‘distributes’ includes circulating, lending, selling, letting on hire or offering for sale or hire.
  • Section 233C, Chapter 21A, Criminal Code. Test of Obscenity. This section states that an article shall be deemed to be obscene for the purposes of this chapter if its effect taken as a whole is such as to tend to deprave and corrupt persons who are likely to read, see or hear the matter contained or embodied in it.
  • Section 233D, Chapter 21, Criminal Code. Prohibition of Publication of Obscene Matter. This section states that anyone who, whether for gain or not, distributes or projects any article deemed to be obscene, commits an offense punishable by imprisonment for a maximum of three years, or a fine not exceeding 400 Naira, or by both. The section also states that a person shall not be convicted of an offense against this section if he proves that he had not examined the article and had no reasonable cause to suspect that it was obscene in any way.
  • Section 351, Chapter 29, Criminal Code. Assault. Defines the offense of unlawfully assaulting another person. The offender is guilty of a misdemeanor and liable, if no greater punishment is provided, to imprisonment for one year.
  • Section 352, Chapter 29, Criminal Code. Assault with Intent to Commit Unnatural Offenses. States that anyone who assaults another person with intent to have anal intercourse with him or her is guilty of a felony, and is liable to imprisonment for fourteen years.
  • Section 353, Chapter 29, Criminal Code. Indecent Assault on Males. This section states that anyone who unlawfully and indecently assaults any male person is guilty of a felony, and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
  • Section 357, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Definition of Rape. Defines the crime of rape, which is described as having unlawful sexual intercourse with a woman or girl without her consent, or with her consent, if the consent is obtained by force, means of threat, intimidation, fear of bodily harm, or by means of false representations as to the nature of the act, or, in the case of a married woman, by personating her husband.
  • Section 358, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Punishment of Rape. States that anyone who commits the offense of rape is liable to imprisonment for life, with or without caning.
  • Section 359, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Attempt to Commit Rape. This section states that anyone who attempts to commit rape is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for fourteen years, with or without caning.
  • Section 360, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Indecent Assault on Females. This section states that anyone who unlawfully and indecently assaults any woman or girl is guilty of a misdemeanor and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 361, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Abduction. Defines the crime of taking a woman away or detaining her against her will, with intent to marry or perform sexual intercourse with her, or to cause her to marry or have sexual intercourse with another person. The offense is deemed to be a felony and is punishable by imprisonment for up to seven years.
  • Section 362, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Abduction of Girls under Sixteen. States that anyone who unlawfully takes an unmarried girl under the age of sixteen years out of the custody or protection of her father, mother or other person having the lawful care or charge of her, and against the will of the parent or guardian, is guilty of a misdemeanor and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 363, Chapter 30, Criminal Code. Ignorance of Age of Girl, or Consent, no Defense. States that, in respect of any of the offenses under this section, it is irrelevant that the accused person believed that the girl victim was above the age of sixteen, or that the girl was taken with her own consent or at her own suggestion.
  • Section 371, Chapter 32, Criminal Code. Child Stealing. States that anyone who, with intent to deprive a parent or guardian of a child under the age of twelve years of the possession of such child or to steal from the child, forcibly or fraudulently takes or entices away, or detains the child, or receives or harbors the child, knowing that it has been taken, enticed away or detained, is guilty of a felony and liable to imprisonment for fourteen years.
  • Section 373, Chapter 33, Criminal Code. Definition of Defamatory Matter. States that defamatory matter is matter likely to injure the reputation of a person by exposing him to hatred, contempt or ridicule, or likely to damage any person in his profession or trade by an injury to his reputation.
  • Section 374, Chapter 33, Criminal Code. Definition of Publication. States that defamatory matter can be expressed in spoken words; any audible sounds; in words legibly marked on any substance whatever; or by any sign or object signifying such matter other than by words, and may be expressed either directly or by insinuation or irony. This section also states that sounds, if defamatory, are deemed to be published if they are reproduced in any place to the hearing of persons other than the person causing it to be reproduced.
  • Section 375, Chapter 33, Criminal Code. Publication of Defamatory Matter. This section states that any person who publishes any defamatory matter is guilty of a misdemeanor, and is liable to imprisonment for one year. Where the person publishing the defamatory matter knows it to be false, the punishment shall be increased to imprisonment for two years.
  • Section 376, Chapter 33, Criminal Code. Publishing of Defamatory Matter with Intent to Extort. States that anyone who publishes, threatens to publish, offers to abstain from publishing, or offers to prevent the publication of defamatory matter, with intent to extort money or other property, or with intent to induce any person to give, confer, procure, or attempt to procure, to, upon, or for, any person, any property or benefit of any kind is guilty of a felony. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for seven years.
  • Section 23 (1), Cybercrime Act 2015. States that any person who intentionally uses any computer system or network to produce child pornography, offers or makes available child pornography, distributes or transmits child pornography, procures child pornography for oneself or for another person, possess child pornography in a computer system or on a computer-data storage medium commits an offence.
  • Section 23 (2), Cybercrime Act 2015. Child pornography and related offences. States that any person who knowingly makes or sends other pornographic images to another computer by way of unsolicited distribution shall be guilty of an offence.
  • Section 23 (3), Cybercrime Act 2015. Child pornography and related offences. States that any person who, intentionally proposes, grooms or solicits, through any computer system or network, to meet a child for the purpose of engaging in sexual activities with the child commits an offence under this Act.
  • Section 23 (4), Cybercrime Act 2015. Child pornography and related offences. The term “child pornography” includes pornographic material that visually depicts a minor, a person appearing to be a minor, and realistic images representing a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct.
  • Section 23 (5), Cybercrime Act 2015. Child pornography and related offences. The term “child” or “minor” means a person below 18 years of age.
  • Section 24 (1), Cybercrime Act 2015. Cyberstalking. Any person who knowingly or intentionally sends a message or other matter by means of computer system of network that is grossly offensive, pornographic or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character or causes any such a messages commits an offence. Any person who send the message which is known to be false, for the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience danger, obstruction, insult, injury, criminal intimidation, enmity, hatred, ill will or needless anxiety to another commits an offence under this Act.
  • Section 24 (2), Cybercrime Act 2015. Cyberstalking. Any person who knowingly or intentionally transmits or causes the transmission of any communication through a computer system or network to bully, threaten or harass another person, where such a communication places another person in fear of death, violence or bodily harm or to another person commits an offence. Any computer communication containing any threat to kidnap or any harm to the person, any demand or request for a randsom fro the release of any kidnapped person, to Export from any person, firm, association or corporation, any money or other things of value commits an offence. Any computer communication containing any threat to harm the property of reputation of the addressee of of another or the reputation of deceased person or any threat to accuse the addressee of any other person of a crime commits an offence under this Act.
  • Section 7, Sexual Offences Bill, 2015. A person who commits an act which causes penetration with a child under age of eighteen is guilty of an offence called defilement and sentence to imprisonment for life.

2008 - Microsoft Nigeria partnered with Paradigm Initiative Nigeria (PIN) to launch the Microsoft Internet Safety, Security & Privacy Initiative for Nigeria (MISSPIN). The project aims to teach safe behaviors to youth and to encourage them to turn away from cybercrime. One of the focuses of the second phase of the project (initiated in 2010) was to record a music track which it is hoped will become an anthem within Nigeria in Raise political awareness and commitment to combat cybercrime.

2011 - Paradigm Initiative Nigeria (PIN) in partnership with Microsoft Nigeria launched an internet campaign to obtain signatures for an online petition that will be forwarded to legislators for the required cybercrime legislation that Nigeria needs. Along with 54 countries, Nigeria has joined the Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online. The Alliance unites Ministers of the Interior and of Justice from each country to fight against Child Sexual Abuse Online, to rescue victims, to develop more effective prosecution, and to reduce the amount of child sexual abuse images available online.

2013 - Since her appointment as the ITU’s Champion for Online Child Protection, Nigeria’s First Lady, Dame Patience Jonathan has been working to identify risks and weaknesses children face on internet, create maximum awareness of basic online security measures, develop tools that minimize risks and, share knowledge and experience through multi-dimensional means. Nigerian Communications Commission has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ITU to establish a Regional Cybersecurity Center in the country. The Center facilitates collaboration on combating cyber threats at the regional and national levels, with an emphasis on protecting children online.

2014 - Nigeria launch its National Child Online Protection Policy, a policy for all stakeholders to commit to and drive safer use of the cyber space for children and adults, focusing on policy makers, regulators, private sectors, operators, children, parents and institutions of learning. The Office of the National Security Adviser established the Nigerian Computer Emergency Response Team (ngCERT) to promote the philosophy of cybersecurity research initiatives in Nigeria.

2015 - The Senate passed Cybercrime Bill, 2015 and has been signed into law by the president May 15th. Along with fighting against cybercrime in Nigeria. the bill contains provisions for misuse of a computer or computer network to produce or distribute child pornography. Microsoft Nigeria has joined forces with the Office of the National Security Adviser (ONSA) and other industry stakeholders, to tackle cybercrime causing in Nigeria. NITDA has concluded plans to collaborate with ONSA to develop a framework aimed at addressing child online abuse in the country. Nigerian Senate passes Sexual Offences Bill, 2015 into Law.