Mexico

Population

121,736,809

Population 0‑14

27.6%

Internet Users

49.3%

Facebook Users

60,000,000

Mobile Subscribers

104,100,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

Education in Mexico falls under the remit of the Secretariat of Public Education. Its website contains information for parents, teachers and students but information on curricula and Internet safety is not readily accessible. Students and teachers do benefit from a range of online teaching materials and links to educational websites.

2005 - The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab instigated the now-famous project One Laptop per Child in an attempt to provide a basic laptop to all the poorest children in the world, especially in developing countries.

2008 - In an effort to address the growing issue of cyberbullying, the Internet Security Alliance (ASI) initiated the Centro de Evaluación de las TICs - CENETIC (ICT Evaluation Center) program, which urges schools to incorporate lessons in cyber citizenship and digital literacy into their academic program. The program aims to measures about the safe and responsible use of the Internet in schools, and includes practical lessons and teacher training. It uses examples of real cases received via their incident report line.

2009 - EducaTIC UNAM, an initiative of [email protected] puma, the Coordination Unit for Technologies in Education of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, aims to integrate modern technologies into the teaching-learning process, enabling students and teachers alike to develop their digital skills. The main focus lies on basic computer abilities and the use of computers as a digital tool in the classroom. Educators can work towards a diploma for ICT applications in teaching, and students can access a virtual classroom.

The Fundación Proacceso is the non-profit behind the Red de Innovación y Aprendizaje (RIA): a group of centers that connect under-served communities to quality education and technology. In 2009, with the support of the Council on Science and Technology of the State of Mexico (COMECyT), the Foundation launched its first ten RIA centers, which assisted more than 73,000 users in their first year of operation. The RIA was presented at the OECD Annual Forums in 2010 and 2011, as well as at a number of other high-profile events and was selected as one of the top 50 social projects transforming Mexico in 2010.

The Habilidades Digitales para Todos (HDT) (Digital Skills For All) program is an educational technology initiative that strives to transform Mexican schools and the teaching and learning process through the use of technology. The strategy aims to create technology centers within schools and equip classrooms with Internet access and hardware which improves both teaching and learning. One of the initiative’s four components focuses on technological infrastructure. 2010 - The Aulas Fundación Telefónica is a project related to the Proniño program, the social arm of the Telefónica Foundation, which seeks to increase the quality of education from primary schools through the inclusion of ICTs as a learning tool, as well as by including digital literature and culture as subject areas. Instructional Coordinators train teachers in the use of modern technologies, whilst educators commit to implementing technology into their teaching practices as well as to encourage their peers, parents and students to be trained in its use.

Among the resources offered by the RIA is a series of Educational Video Games for children. Each game uses a different theme and set of characters; teaching technology skills alongside traditional topics such as math and spelling. The portal Fundacion Proacceso hosting the games was launched with the support of the Secretariat of Public Education in 2010 and has so far seen more than 3,000 registrations from 47 countries around the world.

2011 - The Mexican government introduced the usage of Cinetransformers as part of the project “Plaza del conocimiento, un proyecto de inclusión digital” (Knowledge square: a project for digital inclusion). It consists of a mobile cinema service that brings digital literacy to remote areas with little access to technology. The project receive the support of Microsoft, Intel, IUSA, Cisco, Elara.

2012 - The State of Sonora received 5,000 XO laptops in 2012 under their Un Nuevo Futuro (A New Future) program, which aims to provide tools giving children access to knowledge and skills. Adoption of the One Laptop per Child program is part of the State of Sonora’s wider plan to improve Internet connectivity for all its citizens.

Internet safety information can be accessed through the website of the Internet Security Alliance(ASI) which is also the country’s reporting node. In May, the ASI held a congress in Mexico City, bringing together a range of stakeholders from youth, to law enforcement and other professionals. In addition to presentations from a range of experts on topics such as child pornography and the legal implications of online use, an inter-generational debate was held. During the debate, children and parents faced each other to discuss their positions and explain their views and concerns about Internet use.

2013 - the President of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto, announced the launch of the country’s National Digital Strategy. The strategy, Digital Mexico, detailing five main goals, the third of which is Quality Education. The integration of ICT into all aspects of teaching and learning is part of this goal.

2014 - In March, the Federal Government of Mexico launched the pilot of the Programa de Inclusión Digital (Digital Inclusion Program) in the states of Morelos, Queretaro and Guanajuato. The program focuses on the delivery of laptops to public school students in fifth and sixth grade, and seeks to meet different deployment models of technology in the classroom, as well as best practices and strategies of training teachers and students. The program receives support and feedback from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), UNESCO regional offices and the Civil Society Committee composed of officials of foundations and organizations that promote quality education.

Nearly 4,500 students from the states of Morelos, Queretaro and Guanajuato have directly benefited from the pilot, which is the result of eight partnerships in the technology industry, formed by companies including Intel, Google, Cisco, and national NGOs including the Fundación Alejo Peralta and the Fundación México Educado. Within these partnerships, other companies, including Microsoft, Promethean and Eurail are also involved. Alejandra Lagunes, the country’s National Digital Strategy Coordinator, spoke about the program at FOSI’s roundtable event in Mexico City in April 2014](https://www.fosi.org/events/mexico-city-roundtable-2014/). She highlighted the need for digital inclusion, and called on industry and civil society to collaborate with governments to provide the tools to teach safe online behaviors to newly-connected children.

[The National Autonomous University of Mexico, through its tv channel, TV UNAM, in partnership with the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), through the Communication and Education Department, the Public Broadcasting System of Mexico (SPR), with support of UNESCO hosted on December 10th and 11th in Mexico City the first Latin American and Caribbean Forum on Media and Information Literacy (LAC MIL Forum or Foro AMILAC).

The General Assembly of the United Nations Organization has adopted a resolution submitted by Mexico on the protection of children from bullying. This proposal seeks to create awareness on the international community about the seriousness of the problem of bullying among peers and urges States to take urgent action to combat it.

2016 - It was launched in January The Centro para la prevencion del Bullying (Center for Bullying Prevention). This is a platform developed by Facebook in collaboration with UNICEF, the Yale University Center for Emotional Intelligence and the Network for the Rights of Children in Mexico that offers tools to help young people, parents and teachers to prevent and combat bullying .

Safer Internet day doesn’t have a formal SID Committee operating in Mexico, However there are various supporters in schools, individuals and organisations who have celebrated the day.

National Development Plan 2013 - 2018 eHealth and innovation in women’s and children’s health - 2013 survey

Clic Seguro (Click Security)

launched by the Secretariat of Public Education provides online safety information to all ages, with sections for children of different ages, parents and teachers. It contains games, quizzes, tips and videos, all of which aim to teach children to use the Internet safely.

Fundación Proacceso

Is a non-profit organization which uses technology and its educational benefits to reduce the digital divide, by using it to drive the social and economic development of people living in marginalized communities in Mexico. The Foundation works to foster digital inclusion and its main project is the Red de Innovación y Aprendizaje (RIA) ( Learning and Innovation Network). This comprises a group of centers which connect under-served communities in Mexico to quality education and technology.

Instituto Interamericano del Niño, la Niña y Adolescente (INN)

A specialized body of the Organization of American States (OAS) on children and adolescents policy that provides guidance to the different states on how they must assume protection.

Internet Security Alliance (ASI)

Is a partnership between corporate organizations such as Telmex and online safety organizations such as iSAFE and FOSI. Its aim is to provide information on Internet safety in order to protect the country’s children and young people. The site is also the reporting node for Mexico, allowing users to report selected illegal content online.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Latin American Network of Educational Portals (La Red Latinoamericana de Portales Educativos – RELPE)

Formed in 2004 by an agreement of the Ministries of Education from sixteen Latin American countries, a network of educational portals, allowing the collaboration and sharing of educational content between the member countries. It also provides for the construction of standards and methodologies of processes to position the network as a benchmark in the region and the world on collaborative management of educational content.

Latin American Network of ICT and Education (Red Iberoamericana de TIC y Educación – RIATE)

This organization promotes bilateral or multilateral cooperation for development through the exchange of information, initiatives and projects that promote the integration of ICT in education in 21 countries.

One Laptop per Child (OLPC)

A nonprofit organization launched by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, whose aim to empower the world’s poorest children through education by providing a low cost laptops.

Secretariat of Public Education

This website provides online teaching materials, news on the latest developments in the field of education and links for students to enable them to access online subject-based information.

Telmex Foundation

The telecommunications provider, operates a number of digital inclusion initiatives as part of its Corporate and Social Responsibility program. It supports the digital knowledge community, Academica.mx, and (together with Telcel) the Digital Village. The Telmex Digital Library offers computer equipment on loan, provides training on a range of topics and establishes libraries in schools and public spaces.

The Interactive Generations Forum

A nonprofit organization which mission is to promote the use of technology to improve people’s lives. It was founded in 2008 by Telefónica, the University of Navarra and the Inter-American Organization (OUI). The Forum seeks to understand the impact of technology on children aged between 6 - 18 in Latin America, to provide educational resources for that age group and to educate through its own programs.

The Network for the Rights of Children and Adolescents to the Safe and Responsible Use of New ICTs - RedNATIC

It comprises a joint group of organizations from across Latin America. Its member organizations assume as shared the principles of the statements contained in the Theoretical Framework for the rights of children and teens to a Safe and Responsible Use of ICT.

UNAM-CERT

Is the main contact point for reporting network security incidents involving systems and local networks. This is a service of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Digital Divide: Improving Internet Access in the Developing World Through Affordable Services and Diverse Content (2015)

Darrel M. West

This paper presents the different factors present in developing countries that make it difficult for people to have access to internet.

Protecting Children from Cybercrime (2015)

Simone dos Santos Lemos Fernandes, Legal Consultant, Global Forum on Law Justice and Development (GFLJD), Legal Vice Presidency, World Bank

This report studies different Latin American countries’ legislation on the prevention and combat of violence against children on the internet. It also identifies gaps and good practices on the protection of children from cybercrime.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (2014)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children/Sex Trafficking (2014)

U.S. Department of Justice

This is a comprehensive paper by the U.S. Department of Justice on the issue of Commercial Sexual Exploitations of Children

The commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Latin America (2014)

ECPAT International

This report studies the different forms of sexual exploitation of children inLatin America. Furthermore, it highlights the new emerging trends and how Latin america is addressing this phenomena

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI) (2013)

Microsoft

The survey, Computing Safety Index, measures the steps people report taking to protect their computers, mobile phones, and info online in the categories of foundational, technical and behavioral.

Study about ICT skills in junior high school teachers under Mexico’s educational reform (2013)

Maribel Burrola Vazquez, Jose Angel Vera Noriega

This study identifies the usage of ICTs by teachers and their attitudes under the secondary reform based on the ICT Competency Standards for Teachers.

Education Through ICT Polices in Developing Countries: The Case of Mexico (2013)

Jaime Echavarri

This paper analyzes how policy influence ICT usage on teachers by taking into account a qualitative study on 6 elementary school in Mexico

Technologies for Education - Potentials, Parameters and Prospects (2013)

Wadi D. Haddad, Alexandra Draxler

This book frames the issue of ICTs in education besides exploring how their potential could come into effectiveness.

Education and Technology in Mexico and Latin America: Outlook and Challenges. (2013)

Margarita Ontiveros, Jose Raul Canay

This document aims to generate knowledge for the people involved in the ICTs. It highlights different aspects of them as well as their importance in education and access to them

Internet-Facilitated Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (2013)

Kimberly J. Mitchell, Lisa M. Jones

This study provides a summary of how offenders use the new technologies to abuse children, some trends of CSEC and enough information that help law enforcement.

28th meeting of the Word Tourism Network on Child Protection (2013)

UN World Tourism Organization

Report of the twenty-eight meeting of the World Tourism Network on Child Protection. There was an exchange of information, experiences and best practices. It also served as platform for proposing collaborative work.

OpenNet Initiative Country Profile - Mexico (2013)

OpenNet

This paper presents the different factors present in developing countries that make it difficult for people to have access to internet.

First Principles: Designing Effective Education Programs Using Information and Communication Technology (2013)

USAID

This document’s aim is to give guidance on implementing ICT in education programs and information on the lessons learnt to improve projects that involve the use of education technology

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI). (2013)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Small World, Big Responsibility: The UK’s role in the global trade in children (2012)

Erika Hall, Phillippa Lei

This report preset information on the different forms of child exploitation. Its purpose is to raise awareness to this global issue.

ICT IN EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN A regional analysis of ICT integration and e-readiness (2012)

UNESCO Institute for Statistics

UNESCO Institute for Statistics, based on survey responses from 38 countries reveals the extent to which factors such as education policy, teacher training, and infrastructure drive or hamper the integration of ICTs in schools.

Child Safety Online - Global Challenges and Strategies (2012)

UNICEF

The aim of this report is call into attention that new technologies can be a great danger for children and it urges for new stronger laws and regulations.

Digital technologies meet the challenges of inclusive education in Latin America: some examples of good practices (2012)

NU. CEPAL, European Commission

The publication includes a series of studies on policies and programs to integrate digital technologies into education in various Latin American countries. The document also presents eight cases of good practices in ICTs that can be used in the Latin American school system to contribute to inclusion and reduce social inequalities.

Global Digital Communication: Texting, Social Networking Popular Worldwide (2012)

J. Menasce Horowitz, K. Simmons, J. Poushter, C. Barker

The report is a part of the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project, which conducts opinion surveys on subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day.

The Protection of Children Online (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and the Internet (2011)

Inter American Children’s Instirute

This is a report to the Organization of American States on the situation of the member states in the issue of commercial sexual exploitation and the impact of internet in their lives.

Computers in Schools: Why governments Should do their Homework (2011)

Inter-American Development Bank

This chapter is a comparison of the Latin American governments include ICT in their educational programs.

The Rights of Children and Adolescents in Mexico (2011)

Unicef

This report presents the significant process Mexico has made on reforming education with the purpose to close gaps and improve quality.

Human Trafficking, Sex Tourism, and Child Exploitation on the Southern Border (2011)

Jim Walters, Patricia H. Davis

On this paper is described the current situation on children victims of sexual exploitation

Children’s une of mobile phones - An international comparison 2011 (2010)

GSM Association and the Mobile Society Research Institute within NTT DOCOMO Inc.

A comparative document of the statistics and facts of the usage of mobile phones by children across the globe.

Children’s Use of Mobile Phones and Personal Relationships – An International Comparison 2010 (2010)

Society Research Institute and the GSMA

Society Research Institute and the GSMA jointly conducted an international research study examining the ways in which children communicate through mobile phones

Los desafíos de las TIC para el cambio educativo (2009)

Roberto Carneiro, Juan Carlos Toscano and Tamara Díaz

This is a collective Inter-American educational program which goals are projected until the year 2021. It analyses the challenges of the new era of education and the importance of incorporating ICT on it.

Enhancing Child Safety & Online technologies (2008)

The Berkman Center for Internet Society and The Multi-State Working Group on Social Networking of State Attorneys General of the United States

This report presents the risks minors face online when they use the internet as many of them don’t understand the difference between their lives off and online.

Digital Divide among Low Income People in Colombia, Mexico and Peru (2008)

Luis H. Gutierrez R and Luis F. Gamboa N.

This Research explores the indices of ICT usage in Colombia, Mexico and Peru and its impact in society

Combating Child Sex Tourism: Question and Answers (2008)

ECPAT

This is a general information document on Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children. It also gives an overview of the global situation.

Child Sex Tourism in Mexico (2005)

ECPAT

Report on the abuses children face in Mexico. It gives an overview on the legislation and aspects of vulnerability

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children: A Fact Sheet (2005)

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Informational paper on Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children with facts from different studies on child abuse in U.S., Canada and Mexico

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children In the U.S., Canada and Mexico (2001)

Richard J. Estes, Neil Alan Weiner

Research on the patterns of CSE and CSEC in U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children In the U.S., Canada Federal and Mexico (2001)

Richard J. Estes, Neil Alan Weiner

Research on the patterns of CSE and CSEC in U.S., Canada Federal and Mexico.

Boy and Girl Victims of Sexual Exploitation in Mexico (2000)

Elena Azola

This study aims to explain the similarities and differences of six types of exploitation in six different towns in Mexico

Different Educational Inequalities: ICT and Option to Close the Gaps (2000)

Guillermo Kelley-Salinas

This chapter focuses on the learning gaps in developing countries and what are the best strategies and elements for a better design and implementation of ITCs.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent in Mexico is fifteen years of age and the age of majority is eighteen, as is the legal age for marriage without parental consent.

  • Article 200, Penal Code. This Article states that anyone who distributes, circulates, or offers to children under the age of eighteen years any books, writings, recordings, films, photographs, prints, images or objects of a pornographic nature, whether real or simulated, will be liable to imprisonment for up to six months and a fine of between 300 to 500 days’ minimum salary.
  • Article 201, Penal Code. This section covers the corruption of minors under the age of eighteen, as well as persons with limited mental capacity which precludes them from providing consent. Among the offenses covered (which included providing alcohol to minors and similar crimes) is the crime of compelling, inducing or providing a minor for the purposes of engaging in sexual acts, whether real or simulated. The punishment for that particular crime is seven to twelve years’ imprisonment and a fine of 800 to 2,500 days’ minimum salary.
  • Article 202, Penal Code. This section defines the crime of child pornography involving minors under the age of eighteen and the production, reproduction, possession, distribution, import, export or possession of such materials, among other definitions. The material may be in any format and includes both real and simulated acts. Those responsible for creating such material (in any format, including electronic means) face a term of imprisonment of between seven and twelve years, as well as a fine of 2,800 days’ minimum salary. The same penalties apply to those who reproduce such content and any images or materials from the commission of the crime will be destroyed. Possession of child pornography incurs a sentence of one to five years’ imprisonment and a fine of 100 to 500 days’ minimum salary. All offenders may be required to undergo psychiatric treatment.
  • Article 202bis, Penal Code. States that it is a criminal offense to store, buy or lease any material mentioned in Article 2012. The penalty is imprisonment for one to five years and a fine of between 100 to 500 days’ minimum salary.
  • Article 203, Penal Code. Defines the offense of sex tourism as to promote, facilitate, advertise, invite or manage, by any means, the travel of one or more people within or outside the country in order to perform any kind of actual or simulated sexual act with one or any number of children under the age of eighteen. The offense carries a prison term of seven to twelve years, in addition to a fine of 2,800 days’ minimum salary.
  • Article 203bis, Penal Code. States that anyone who utilizes sex tourism to carry out any real or simulated sexual acts with children under the age of eighteen via the use of sex tourism will be liable to imprisonment for twelve to sixteen years, as well as to a fine of between 2,000 to 3,000 days’ minimum salary. All offenders may be required to undergo psychiatric treatment. Article 204, Penal Code. This section defines the crime of procuring a prostitute under the age of eighteen and includes inducing or persuading the victim to engage in prostitution. The punishment for this crime is imprisonment for between eight and fifteen years, as well as a fine of between 1,000 and 2,500 days’ minimum salary.
  • Article 259bis, Penal Code. Defines the crime of repeated sexual harassment committed against a person of either sex by one in a position of authority over the victim. The punishment is a fine of forty days’ minimum salary. The victim must press charges for this offense to be prosecuted and injury or damage must be deemed to have been caused to the victim. In the event that the offender is a public servant who abused their position, this section states that they will lose their job upon conviction.
  • Article 260, Penal Code. Defines the crime of performing a forced sexual act which does not include intercourse on a person. The sentence is between six to ten years’ imprisonment and a fine of up to 200 days’ minimum salary. In that case, the sentence is increased by up to half. -Article 261, Penal Code. Defines the crime of performing a sexual act which does not include intercourse on a child under the age of fifteen, or a victim who is unable to consent by reason of physical or mental lack of capacity. The sentence is between six to thirteen years’ imprisonment and a fine of up to 500 days’ minimum salary, unless violence or coercion was used to commit the offense. In that case, the sentence is increased by up to half.
  • Article 262, Penal Code. Defines the offense of having intercourse with a minor aged between fifteen and eighteen, by means of deception. The punishment for this offense is a term of imprisonment of between three months and four years.
  • Article 265, Penal Code. Rape. Defines the offense of using force or coercion to have sexual intercourse with a victim of either sex, or by violating a victim with an implement for sexual purposes. The punishment is between eight and 20 years’ imprisonment. -Article 266, Penal Code. This section refers to other classifications of crime treated as rape. It defines the offense of statutory rape – that of having sexual intercourse without the use of violence with a child under the age of twelve. It also covers the offense of having sexual intercourse without the use of violence with a victim who lack the mental capacity to consent. This section also covers the penetration of the vagina or anus of a child under the age of twelve or person unable to provide consent by reason of lack of mental capacity, by anything other than the penis. If violence or coercion was used in the commission of any of the aforementioned offenses, the penalty is increased by up to half. Increased penalties also apply if two or more offenders are involved in the commission of the crime; the offender is related to the victim or if the offender is in a position of authority over the victim. If the crime is committed by a public servant they will lose their position or be suspended from carrying out their duties for a period of five years after the end of their term of imprisonment.
  • Article 266, Penal Code. This section refers to other classifications of crime treated as rape. It defines the offense of statutory rape – that of having sexual intercourse without the use of violence with a child under the age of fifteen. It also covers the offense of having sexual intercourse without the use of violence with a victim who lack the mental capacity to consent. This section also covers the penetration of the vagina or anus of a child under the age of fifteen or person unable to provide consent by reason of lack of mental capacity, by anything other than the penis. The penalty for rape is between eight and 30 years’ imprisonment. If violence or coercion was used in the commission of any of the aforementioned offenses, the penalty is increased by up to half.
  • Article 266bis, Penal Code. Increased penalties for rape as described above also apply if two or more offenders are involved in the commission of the crime; the offender is related to the victim or if the offender is in a position of authority over the victim. If the crime is committed by a public servant they will lose their position or be suspended from carrying out their duties for a period of five years after the end of their term of imprisonment.

Representatives from the United States, Canada and Mexico met in December 2001 to develop a plan to combat the commercial sexual exploitation of children, including the problems of child prostitution, pornography and sexual trafficking. The North American Regional Consultation on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children included 100 governmental and non-governmental representatives from law-enforcement, human-services and child-advocacy groups in the three nations. The conference was held at the University of Pennsylvania.

2007 - The Family Online Safety Institute, along with Telmex and Family & Society, brought together leaders in government, the online industry, academics and non-profit organizations in the search for a solution to online safety for all Internet users in Mexico. “Creating a National Consensus for Online Safety featured sessions by First Lady of Mexico Margarita Zavala, Secretary of Education for Mexico Josefina Vazquez Mota, Secretary of Health for Mexico Jose Angel Cordova Villalobos, along with other prominent leaders from Mexico and the United States.

Mexico is part of the 54 countries members of the the Global Alliance. An initiative by the EU against Child Sexual Abuse Online. Members shared political targets that should result in a larger number of rescued victims, more effective prosecution, and an reduction in the amount of child sexual abuse images available online. The Participants produced progress reports on the actions they committed to, on the occasion of the Second Ministerial Conference, in September 2014. (Mexican Report)