Jordan

Population

8,117,564

Population 0‑14

35.4%

Internet Users

86.1%

Facebook Users

4,100,000

Mobile Subscribers

10,300,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2003 - The Jordan Education Initiative (JEI) was launched by the government of Jordan under the patronage of Her Majesty Queen Rania of Jordan at the Extraordinary Meeting of the World Economic Forum at the Dead Sea. One of its objectives is to encourage the development of an efficient public-private model for the acceleration of educational reforms in developing countries based on unleashing the innovation of teachers and students through the effective use of ICT.

2003 - The national Education Reform for a Knowledge Economy (ERfKE) initiative ran from 2003-2009, and was intended to transform the education system at the early childhood, basic, and secondary levels to turn out graduates equipped with the necessary skills for the knowledge economy. With support from USAID the initiative implemented the Management Information Stream (MIS) curriculum for grades 11 and 12, which consists of basics of management, management information systems, computerized accounting, business statistics, computer programming and e-commerce. In addition, Jordan developed the national broadband network and established one or more computer labs in most national schools.

2009 - The ERfKE II initiative was approved and designed to increase the skills of pre-tertiary students. One of the components of the program is to review and revise the curriculum and student assessment to ensure alignment with ERfKE I, which includes the provision of additional and replacement ICT equipment for schools. Moreover, the aim is to improve ICT connectivity available in all schools to permit blended e-learning in core subject areas.

Ongoing - As a part of the general objectives for the Jordanian Educational System, the Ministry of Education lists that by the end of the educational cycle, students should be able to “vigilantly comprehend technology and acquire skills of using, producing and developing it, and subjugate this technology to serve the society” and “comprehend scientific basics of all exposed types of technology and exploit them in daily life.”

The Ministry of Education also uses EduWave(1), which is a cloud-based e-Learning system and also operates in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman, Syria and the United States.

The Ministry of Information and Communication Technology (MoICT) has resources that promote Technology for All and include information on Internet safety and etiquette for students, children and Internet cafe customers.

The MoICT also publishes regular studies and reports on global information technology use and ICT use in households, enterprises and schools (in Arabic) and has several initiatives in place to promote ICT in schools and businesses.

The MoICT has signed several strategic agreements with Microsoft, Inges and Oracle to financially support and supply ICT in schools, offer training programs for teachers, students and government officials, and implement information technologies in government administration.

7iber.com

7iber (pronounced ‘hiber’, with a hard ‘h’) is an independent, Jordanian-based, youth-oriented media outlet. The organization aims to provide an online platform that allows young Jordanians to become more actively engaged, fostering a critical and informed civil society through an independent and participatory new media. 7iber offers a model for free speech in Jordan by offering an alternative to mainstream and state-run media, while attempting to provide professional, ethical and fearless journalism.

Information and Communication Technology Association of Jordan ([email protected])

[email protected] is an ICT & IT Enabled Services (ITES) industry-support association that aims to improve the dynamics of Jordan’s ICT and ITES market and developing the Jordan’s ICT and ITES related activities.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU), Arab States

The specialized agency for ICT in the United Nations.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Jordan Computer Society

The Jordan Computer society aims to elevate the professional, technical, and scientific levels of the individuals working in the ICT field, as well as improve the sector’s professions.

Jordan Education Initiative (JEI)

The JEI was launched in 2003 by the government under the patronage of Her Majesty Queen Rania of Jordan by the World Economic Forum. One of its objectives is to encourage the development of an efficient public-private model for the acceleration of educational reforms in developing countries based on using ICT efficiently to unleash the innovation of teachers and students.

Jordan River Foundation

Established in 1995 and chaired by Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah, this NGO aims to empower society, especially women and children, to improve the quality of life to secure a better future for all Jordanians. Their Child Safety Program endeavors to enhance positive child-rearing practices to protect children and identify, confront and eliminate various kinds of abuse.

Madrasati

Madrasati seeks to rejuvenate the education experience of Jordanian students and provide them with a safe physical environment to learn, develop and grow.

Ministry of Information and Communication Technology

The MoICT seeks to promote a competitive ICT sector that is given the widest possible scope to enhance the quality of life of citizens and contribute to the socio - economic development of the Kingdom.

Women in Technology (WIT) for the Middle East and North Africa

Funded by the United States State Department’s Middle East Partnership Initiative, WIT was implemented in collaboration with local partners in nine countries/regions: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen. The aims of WIT are to empower women and increase their participation in the workforce by providing partner organizations with curricula, training, professional development, and Information Technology.

Arab Social Media Report (2015)

Arab Social Media Influencers Summit

The Arab social media report provides an overview on the social media reality in the Arab world through the monitoring of all social media trends in the Arab world and provides a detailed view on using social media channels in the different Arab countries.

Assessment of Media Development in Jordan (2015)

T. Mendel, Y. Shukkeir, D. Baslan, M. Shalabieh, S. Zaideh

This MDI Assessment provides a detailed review of the different parts of the overall environment for media freedom, in accordance with the MDI methodology, identifying the various strengths and weaknesses and pointing the way to reform needs.

Understanding The Terminolog y Used To Describe Bullying Acts In Qatar (2014)

Muthanna Samar; Mahitab Sherif; Jon Perkins; Hisham Morsi; Azhar Omar Al Rawas; Aiman El Asam

This study aims to investigate the perception of bullying amongst Qataris and Arabic speakers in Qatar

ICT Use and Diffusion in Schools in Jordan (2013)

Ministry of Education, Jordan Education Initiative, Ministry of Information and Communications Technology

This study aimed at examining the readiness and the use of ICT in all schools in Jordan

Media Use in the Middle East (2013)

E. Dennis, J. Martin, R. Wood

This report provides a view of how people in the Middle East use media and how they feel about their effect on their lives and societies.

Mapping Digital Media: Jordan (2013)

R. Sweis, D. Baslan

The Mapping Digital Media project, which examines the changes in-depth, aims to build bridges between researchers and policymakers, activists, academics and standard-setters across the world.

ICT in Primary Education (2012)

Ivan Kalaš, Haif E. Bannayan, Leslie Conery, Ernesto Lava, Diana Laurillard, Cher Ping Lim, Sarietjie Musgrave, Alexei Semenov, Márta Turcsányi-Szabó

Status of implementation of ICT in primary schools in Slovakia, Jordan, United States, Chile, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, South Africa, Russia, and Hugnary.

Global Digital Communication: Texting, Social Networking Popular Worldwide (2012)

J. Menasce Horowitz, K. Simmons, J. Poushter, C. Barker

The report is a part of the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project, which conducts opinion surveys on subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day.

Global Monitoring Report on the status of action against commercial exploitation of children: Jordan (2008)

ECPAT

This report aims to provide a baseline of information on actions taken and remaining gaps for addressing CSEC in each country, based on the framework of the Agenda for Action, to enable more systematic assessment of progress on implementation of this commitment.

Jordan Media Survey (2008)

Jordan Media Strengthening Program

The recently released second edition of the Jordan Media Survey includes significant findings on Internet usage, as well as on the most popular online news sources.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The Ministry of Justice defines child as a person who has completed age of seven years, but didn’t complete twelve years.

In September 2010, King Abdullah approved the Cyber Crimes Law (also known as Information System Crime Law) which imposes jail sentences and fines for hacking into websites and other technology-related offenses such as spreading computer viruses.

  • Article 292, Penal Code. Rape. This Article states that the penalty for raping a woman (other than his wife) without her consent, whether by force, threat, deception or fraud, is imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of fifteen years. The death penalty applies if the victim is under the age of fifteen. The article also states that anyone who has sexual intercourse with a girl aged over five but under eighteen without the use of force, threat, deception or fraud, will be liable to imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of 20 years.
  • Article 294, Penal Code. Sexual Assault. Sets a penalty of imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of seven years for anyone who sexually assaults a female aged between fifteen and eighteen. This will be increased to fifteen years’ hard labor if the victim is over the age of two but under fifteen. If the victim is under the age of two, the offense will be classed as rape and punished as specified above.
  • Article 295bis, Penal Code. States that anyone who commits acts of sodomy with a male or female without her consent, whether by force, threat, deception or fraud, is guilty of an offense and liable to imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum term of ten years. If the victim is over the age of five but under fifteen, an aggravated sentence of imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of fifteen years will apply. If the victim is aged between two and five, the term will be increased to 20 years. If the child victim is under the age of two, imprisonment with hard labor for life will be the punishment. The Article also states that acts of sodomy with a male or female are unlawful, even with consent and without the use of force, threat, deception or fraud. The penalty will be imprisonment with hard labor for at least five years if the victim is aged between five and eighteen; if the victim is over the age of two but under five, the penalty will increase to a minimum of ten years hard labor; life imprisonment will be imposed if the victim is under the age of two.
  • Article 296, Penal Code. Defines the offense of indecent assault with violence or threat. The crime is punishable by imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of four years. Where the victim is over the age of five but under eighteen, an aggravated penalty of a minimum of five years’ imprisonment will apply. This will be increased to a minimum of seven years if the victim is aged between two and five.
  • Article 298, Penal Code. This Article states that anyone who commits an indecent act on a male or female child over the age of five but under eighteen without violence or threat is liable to imprisonment with hard labor for a maximum term of ten years. The minimum penalty is five years’ imprisonment with hard labor if the victim is over the age of two but under five.
  • Article 299, Penal Code. Sets a penalty of imprisonment with hard labor for a minimum of eight years for anyone who attempts to indecently assault a child under the age of twelve or induces the child to indecently assault another person.
  • Article 301, Penal Code. This Article states that the penalties set for indecent assault in the preceding articles will be increased by one third to half if the crime was committed jointly by more than one person, or if the victim contracted a sexual disease or lost her virginity as a result of the crime. The Article also states that where negligence caused the victim’s death, the offender will be liable to imprisonment with hard labor for no less than fifteen years. This will be increased to 20 years if the offender knowingly infected the victim with HIV.
  • Article 302, Penal Code. Defines the offense of kidnapping another person by fraud or deception, which will be sentenced as follows: imprisonment for one to three years if the male victim is over the age of eighteen; imprisonment with hard labor for one to three years if the male victim is under the age of eighteen, or if the victim is female, no matter how old; imprisonment with hard labor for no less than eight years if the victim was the offender’s wife. The article also states that a minimum of eight years’ hard labor will apply if the male or female victim was kidnapped and subjected to indecent assault, which is increased to a minimum of twelve years if the victim is under five years of age. Hard labor for twenty years will be imposed on anyone who kidnaps a female and subjects her to rape or sodomy without her consent, or if a male victim was subjected to a homosexual act; if the victim is over five but under eighteen, the penalty will increase to hard labor for life.
  • Article 305, Penal Code. This article sets a penalty of imprisonment for between one month and two years for anyone who indecently touches a male or female under the age of eighteen, or female over the age of eighteen without her consent.
  • Article 306, Penal Code. States that it is offense to offer or solicit sex from a male person under the age of eighteen or from a female no matter how old. The penalty is imprisonment for up to six months or a fine of between 30 to 200 Jordanian Dinars.
  • Article 310, Penal Code. This Article states that anyone who procures or attempts to procure a female under the age of 20 who is not a prostitute or a woman of ill-repute in order for a third person to illegally have sexual intercourse with her is guilty of an offense and liable to a term of imprisonment for between six months to three years and a fine or 200 to 500 Jordanian Dinars. The same penalty applies to anyone who procures or attempts to procure a woman to become a prostitute in Jordan or abroad; or to live in or frequent a brothel, or a child under the age of fifteen in order to sodomize him/her.
  • Article 311, Penal Code. Defines the offense of procuring or attempting to procure a female to commit illegal sexual intercourse in Jordan or abroad by threat or intimidation, or to procure a woman who is not a prostitute or of ill-repute to have sexual intercourse with another person by deceit. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for between one to three years.
  • Article 316, Penal Code. This Article imposes a penalty of imprisonment for up to one year or a fine of up to 50 Jordan Dinars for any woman who is proven to influence, for the purpose of gain, the activities of a prostitute in such manner as to demonstrate that she is assisting or compelling the latter to engage in prostitution.
  • Article 317, Penal Code. Defines the offense of prostituting a woman without her consent in any place or in a brothel to a man to have illegitimate sexual intercourse with her. The penalty for this offense is imprisonment for between two months and two years.
  • Article 319, Penal Code. Imposes a penalty of imprisonment for a maximum term of three months and a fine not exceeding 50 Jordan Dinars for the following: selling or possessing with a view to sell or distribute a lewd publication, manuscript, photographs, drawing, design or any other object which could corrupt public morality, or printing or reproducing such objects and materials in any other way in order to sell or distribute them; displaying in public any depiction, photograph, drawing, lewd design or any other object which could corrupt public morality, or distributing such objects for display in public; running a shop which sells, publishes, or displays lewd objects whether publications, manuscripts, photographs, drawings, designs or any other objects that could corrupt public morality; advertising or publicizing by whatever means the fact that an individual sells, prints, reproduces, displays or distributes such lewd objects and materials.

2003 - Microsoft provided support to the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (ICMEC), enabling it to conduct a series of training sessions for law enforcement agencies over five years, including in Jordan. The sessions explained how to conduct successful investigations of computer-facilitated crimes against children and by the end of the program, 3,219 officers from 113 countries had benefited from the training.

2004 - In partnership with UNICEF, Jordan published the Jordanian National Action Plan for Children (2004-2013), which addressed the protection of children against victimization, including mention of efforts to eliminate child pornography and sexual exploitation.

2006 - Jordan ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.

2012 - The Ministry of Information and Communications technology published the National Information Assurance and Cyber Security Strategy (NIACSS). This strategy promotes cybersecurity, but did not specifically mention protection of children online. The strategy announced that the government is establishing the National Computer Emergency Response Team (JOCERT), which will enable Jordan manage and respond to cyber incidents to achieve a higher level of efficiency and transparency across government, with citizens, and in the private sector, increase public awareness, and provide on-the-job tech safety training. Also in 2012, a regional cyber drill was hosted in Amman, Jordan to help enhance the communication and incident response capabilities and develop future plans for cybersecurity.

2014 - Jordan, along with Palestine, are being assessed on their readiness to implement a national Computer Incident Response Team (CIRT), which would provide the capability to identify, respond to, and manage cyber threats.

2015 - In a recent report, UNICEF referenced a newly established Jordanian police unit on online crimes against children that receives specialized training to address crimes against children online and educates children on how to identify risks of online exploitation and abuse and how to report these crimes. Additionally, Jordan is on of 17 countries in the UNICEF Global Programme to protect children from online sexual exploitation.