India

Population

1,251,695,591

Population 0‑14

28.1%

Internet Users

30.0%

Facebook Users

136,000,000

Mobile Subscribers

1,000,000,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2012 - The Department of School Education & Literacy under the Ministry of Human Resource Development enacted the National Policy on Information & Communication Technology, which details comprehensive plans to improve the quality of ICT tuition received in schools, as well as significant upgrades to the IT infrastructure.

Ongoing - The Department of School Education & Literacy has a section of their website dedicated to how ICT is integrated in school systems. Topics covered include an overview of the program, guidelines, policy documents, reports, and others.

The Department of Higher Education, which is also under the Ministry of Human Resource Development, details protocols for Technology Enabled Learning and Distance Learning on their website.

The Department of Electronics and Information Technology under the Ministry of Communications & Information Technology details information about e-Learning in India including how it is funded and research and development that has been done around it.

Aarambh

This organization works towards protecting children from sexual offences through promoting best practice, research, training and systemic change alongside a vast partnership network.

British Telecom India

The regional branch of major telecommunications company BT, which is involved in fighting cybercrime and promoting ICT

Central Institute of Educational Technology

This organization seeks to widen educational opportunities, promote equity and improve quality of educational processes at school level. CIET has developed the National Repository of Open Educational Resources, which aims to bring together all digital resources for the school system for all classes and for all subjects in all regional languages.

ChildLine India

This nonprofit organization operates a 24-hour helpline for the benefit of children up to the age of eighteen (although they assist young people up to the age of 25 in extreme emergencies) who are the victims of a range of problems, including sexual exploitation and abuse. While not an Internet safety site by definition, the national helpline certainly provides a means for children to report issues which may have Internet safety links in a safe and confidential manner.

Data Security Council of India (DSCI)

The DCSI acts as a self-regulatory body within India, working with all its stakeholders and engaging with the government to promote data security and data privacy. In addition, the organization has given presentations on Internet safety to schools in Delhi as part of a Government-run cyber security awareness project.

Defence for Children International (DCI)

Defence for Children International is an international NGO with India as a focus in a wider international effort of protecting children’s human rights. They provide direct intervention for children in need, advocacy, lobbying, research and monitoring on international children’s rights standards, abuses, and violations, and offer recommendations, resources, and training for further action in protecting children’s human rights.

Freedom from Abuse of Children through Technology (FACT)

FACT is a program of the Asian School of Cyber Laws and provides information for parents and children on some of the threats which exist online and safe behaviors to mitigate them.

Global e-Schools and Communities Initiative (GeSCI)

Part of the UN ICT task-force, focused on ICT education across Africa and the developing world. Provides technical and research assistance to e-learning programs.

[email protected]

Run by the Department of School Education & Literacy, [email protected] helped develop the National Policy on ICT and is involved in implementation and support of the policy in schools.

Indian Child

This website provides a wide range of information, aimed primarily at parents, focused on keeping India’s children safe online. It offers a parent’s guide to Internet safety, provides information on reporting inappropriate or illegal content and provides some basic advice on the need to use software to help protect the family from online threats. In addition, the website offers the details of sites which it deems to be safe for children to use, as well as an Internet safety pledge for children to sign.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Ministry of Human Resource Development

The Ministry houses the Departments of School Education & Literacy and Higher Education, which provides information on all levels of education and gives details of the current educational initiatives surrounding improving educational access for females and the ICT in schools.

Sanlaap

Sanlaap is an organisation that campaigns against commercial sexual exploitation of children in India. They provide rescue, rehabilitation, and reintegration for victims. They work on counter-trafficking activities through campaigning, advocacy, and sensitisation of stakeholders in India on the issue.

Terre des Hommes Netherlands

This NGO focuses on stopping child sexual exploitation, child labor, child abuse and child trafficking in Asia, East Africa and Europe.

The Realities of Cyber Parenting: What Pre-teens and Teens Are Up To Online (2015)

Family Online Safety Institute and Intel Security

This global study examined the online behaviors and social networking habits of pre-teens and teens aged between 8 and 16 years old, as well as looking at the concerns of parents.

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in South Asia (2014)

ECPAT

Developments, progress, challenges and recommended strategies for civil society in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka

Reducing violence against children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (2014)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Reducing violence agains children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

Mapping Digital Media: India (2013)

V. Parthasarathi, A. Srinivas, A. Shukla, S. Chotani, A. Kovacs, A. Raman, S. Narain

The Mapping Digital Media project, which examines the changes in-depth, aims to build bridges between researchers and policymakers, activists, academics and standard-setters across the world.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI) (2013)

Microsoft

The survey, Computing Safety Index, measures the steps people report taking to protect their computers, mobile phones, and info online in the categories of foundational, technical and behavioral.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI). (2013)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Global Digital Communication: Texting, Social Networking Popular Worldwide (2012)

J. Menasce Horowitz, K. Simmons, J. Poushter, C. Barker

The report is a part of the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project, which conducts opinion surveys on subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day.

Children’s use of mobile phones – An international comparison 2012 (2012)

GSMA

This report surveyed 4,500 children to provide a detailed picture of children’s mobile phone usage across five different countries

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Online and Upcoming: The Internet's Impact on India (2012)

C. Gnanasambandam, A. Madgavkar, N. Kaka, J. Manyika, M. Chui, J. Bughin, M. Gomes

This report assesses the impact of the Internet on India’s economy, estimating its impact on GDP.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey. (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Small World, Big Responsibility: The UK’s role in the global trade in children (2012)

Erika Hall, Phillippa Lei

This report preset information on the different forms of child exploitation. Its purpose is to raise awareness to this global issue.

Children’s Use of Mobile Phones and Personal Relationships – An International Comparison 2010 (2010)

Society Research Institute and the GSMA

Society Research Institute and the GSMA jointly conducted an international research study examining the ways in which children communicate through mobile phones

2010 Norton Online Family Report (2010)

Norton by Symantec

The report reveals how children are spending more time online and have had more negative online experiences than parents realize. It highlights different approaches taken by families globally and uncovers the emotional impact of children’s negative online experiences.

Children’s une of mobile phones - An international comparison 2011 (2010)

GSM Association and the Mobile Society Research Institute within NTT DOCOMO Inc.

A comparative document of the statistics and facts of the usage of mobile phones by children across the globe.

Online Child Safety from Sexual Abuse in India (2009)

L. Mathew

This paper examines the situation in India, makes comparisons to best practice in other countries and suggests some changes which could be made to the law to strengthen children’s protection from sexual abuse committed with the use of new technologies.

Meta-survey on the Use of Technologies in Education in Asia and the Pacific (2003)

Glen Farrell, Cédric Wachholz

This study identifies and analyses the different practices in the use of ICTs in education in Asia and the Pacific. it discusses countries’ policies, challenges and successful ICT integration in the region.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of technology or the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

  • Section 293, Penal Code. Sale etc. of obscene objects to minors. This section states that it is a crime to sell, let to hire, distribute, exhibit or circulates any obscene object (defined in section 292) to anyone under the age of 20. Offers or attempts so to do are also prohibited. The punishment for any of these offenses is, for a first conviction, imprisonment for up to three years and a fine of up to two thousand rupees. A second or subsequent conviction results in imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to five thousand rupees. The definition of an obscene object given in section 292 is a book, pamphlet, paper, writing, drawing, painting representation, figure or any other object which is lascivious or appeals to the prurient interest or if its effect, or (where it comprises two or more distinct items) the effect of any one of its items, is, if taken as a whole, likely to deprave and corrupt persons who are likely, having regard to all relevant circumstances, to read, see or hear the matter contained or embodied in it.
  • Indian Information Technology Act 2000, Chapter XI, Para 67. Punishment for publishing or transmitting obscene material in electronic form. States that whoever publishes or transmits or causes to be published in the electronic form, any material which is lascivious or appeals to the prurient interest or if its effect is such as to tend to deprave and corrupt persons who are likely, having regard to all relevant circumstances, to read, see or hear the matter contained or embodied in it, shall be punished on first conviction with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to five years and with fine which may extend to one lakh rupees and in the event of a second or subsequent conviction with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to ten years and also with fine which may extend to two lakh rupees.
  • Indian Information Technology Act 2000, Chapter XI, Para 67A. Punishment for publishing or transmitting of material containing sexually explicit act, etc. in electronic form. This paragraph was added to the legislation in 2008. It states that anyone who publishes, transmits or causes to be published or transmitted (in electronic format) any material which contains sexually explicit acts or conduct is liable to be punished on a first conviction with imprisonment for up to five years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees. A second or subsequent conviction incurs the penalty of imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees.
  • Indian Information Technology Act 2000, Chapter XI, Para 67B. Punishment for publishing or transmitting of material depicting children in sexually explicit act, etc. in electronic form. This section states that it is a crime to publish, transmit or causing to be published or transmitted material in any electronic form which depicts children engaged in a sexually explicit act or conduct. It also prohibits the creation of text or digital images, as well as collecting, seeking, browsing, downloading, advertising, promoting, exchanging or distributing material in any electronic form which depicts children in an obscene, indecent or sexually explicit manner. Likewise, it is prohibited to cultivate, entice or induce children to an online relationship with one or more children for the purposes of a sexually explicit act or in a manner that may offend a reasonable adult on the computer resource. Also prohibited is the facilitation of the abuse of children online or records in any electronic form one’s own abuse or that of others pertaining to sexually explicit acts with children. The punishment for any of the preceding offenses is punishable upon a first conviction with imprisonment for a maximum of five years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees. A second or subsequent conviction is punishable by imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees. The section states that a child is defined as being under the age of eighteen.

The Protection of Children From Sexual Offences Act, 2012 (POCSO Act 2012) The Act can be found and read at http://wcd.nic.in/sites/default/files/childprotection31072012.pdf. - The purpose of the POCSO Act 2012 is to deal with child sexual abuse cases of sexualt assault, sexual harrasment and pornography, while safeguarding the interest of the child at every stage of the judicial process. The mechanisms are to be child-friendly for this process are laid out for reporting, recording of evidence, investigation, and speedy trial of offences through designated special courts. - Protection of Children From Sexual Offenders Act 2012, Chapter I This section states that a child is any person 18 years of age and the different forms of sexual abuse, which include penetrative assault, non-penetrative assault, sexual harassment and pornography, and the certain circumstances when an assault become an “aggravated” sexual assault. - Protection of Children From Sexual Offenders Act 2012, Chapter II-IV These sections explicitly define the different forms of sexual abuse and the punishments for such action. Punishments for sexual abuse are as follows: for penetrative sexual assault no less than seven year which can extend to imprisonment for life and fines; for aggravated penetrative sexual assault no less than 10 years which can extend to imprisonment for life and fines; for sexual assault no less than three years which can extend to five years and fine; for aggravated sexual assault no less than five years which can extend to seven years and fine; for sexual harassment three years and a fine; for use of child for pornographic purposes no less than five years and fine which can extend to seven years for subsequent convictions. - Protection of Children From Sexual Offenders Act 2012, Chapter IX Sect. 39 The model guideline required under section 39 of the act was developed by the Ministry of Women and Child Development for professional experts, NGOs, social workers, psychologists, mental health experts, medical and health experts, child development experts, and legal representatives in assisting the child with pretrial and trial stages. Also included is a guide to mandatory reporting of child sexual abuse to the law enforcement authorities by parents, doctors, and school personnel and consequences of failure to do so. The guideline is found here: http://wcd.nic.in/sites/default/files/POCSO-ModelGuidelines.pdf

2000 – India passed the Information Technology Act of 2000, which prohibits the electronic publishing or transmitting of material depicting children engaging in sexually explicit acts. The section states that a child is defined as being under the age of eighteen. It is prohibited to cultivate, entice or induce children to an online relationship with one or more children for the purposes of a sexually explicit act or in a manner that may offend a reasonable adult on the computer resource. Also prohibited is the facilitation of the abuse of children online or records in any electronic form one’s own abuse or that of others pertaining to sexually explicit acts with children. A first conviction is punishable by imprisonment for a maximum of five years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees. A second or subsequent conviction is punishable by imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to ten lakh rupees.

2009 – India’s Ministry of Women & Child Development launched the Integrated Child Protection Scheme. The scheme aims to protect vulnerable children in India by integrating interventions to safeguard children and prevent harm. It also created a database and knowledge base for child protective services and aims to ensure appropriate responses to child abuse in all sectors and at all levels.

TrackChild serves as the database component of ICPS. It facilitates data entry and matching of missing and found children, and enables follow-up with children who are beneficiaries of ICPS. It requires data entry and updating at police stations, child care institutions, shelters, child welfare committees and juvenile justice boards. The software also makes possible the mapping of vulnerable locations so that corrective action can be taken.