Finland

Population

5,476,922

Population 0‑14

16.4%

Internet Users

93.5%

Facebook Users

2,600,000

Mobile Subscribers

10,400,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2001 - The Mannerheim League for Child Welfare joined forces with the Finnish section of the National Council for Crime Prevention in an awareness raising campaign for safe Internet use. Since then, there have been more advances in the field of online safety with Safer Internet Day becoming an annual event and Save the Children Finland proving an Internet Hotline for the reporting of illegal content online.

2004 - The Information Society Program for Education, Training and Research 2004–2006, adopted by the Ministry of Education and Research, contains major priorities and actions for boosting the information society development in the education, training and research. The program was created to to develop all citizens’ information society knowledge and skills, to enable educational institutions to use ICT in a versatile way in their activities, to establish ICT-based procedures in education, training and research, and to promote social innovation through the use of ICT.

2005 - MILL implemented TUNNE (Internet Safety for Youth) Project, which was designed in line with the European Commission’s Safer Internet Program and completed in 2007. The project empowered citizens to use the internet, as well as other information and communication technologies, safely and responsibly. Project organised a wide national school campaign, which offered trainer visits to Finnish schools, Smart on the Web Conference for youth, and Children and Information Society Seminar for teachers all over the country.

2007 - The National Knowledge Society Strategy 2007-2015 envisioned Finland into a competitive society by 2015. The strategy focused on four strategic intents and aims, one of which is to renew and continuously develop knowledge and learning. ICT is envisaged to be a part of multiform teaching at all levels of education and hoped that basic education will equip a new generation with good skills to utilize and apply the opportunities offered by ICT. One of the measures proposed to attain this strategic intent is the close integration of the use of ICT in teaching with basic and further education for teachers, together with a new set of rules and operating models for online education and study.

The same year, the Finnish Government issued a Resolution on the Objectives of the National Information Society Policy for 2007– 2011. One of the objectives was to carry out a pilot project (ICT in Everyday School Life) on educational use of information and communications technology (ICT) and to use it as a basis to estimate the opportunities to increase the use of computers and information networks in teaching. The Ministry of Transport and Communications created an Advisory Board to implement this project in 20 schools from different parts of Finland. The project aimed to determine operating models geared towards establishing educational use of information and communications technology and to draw up a national plan for this purpose.

Through its Finnish Internet Awareness (FiA) Project, the MILL continued TUNNE’s work, and with assistance from Save the Children Finland and Fioca, it created Helpline for children, where they can raise their concerns and get support on online problems, as well as maintained the Hotline.

2008 - A joint action between Save the Children Finland, MLL, and Ficora implemented the Finnish Internet Awareness and Safety project (FiSA), which continued work of FiA through 2010. The project developed and implemented Internet safety training, enhanced participation in Safer Internet Day, engaged youth panels, and carried out online surveys and activities with the youth population. In addition, it promoted safer use of the internet and to fight against illegal content.

2009 - In its press release, the Finnish Ministry of Transport and Communications declared that starting July 1st, 2010, ISPs must ensure that every permanent home or business is able to take advantage of a reasonably-priced, good-quality broadband connection with a minimum speed of 1Mbps. The aim of this requirement is to improve broadband quality and availability in less well populated rural areas, to enable e-commerce and to provide business opportunities.

2010 - The government adopted the National Plan for Educational Use of Information and Communications Technology, which lays out the strategic policies and actions formulated as a result of the project’s activities conducted in 2008 during the Resolution on the Objectives of the National Information Society Policy for 2007– 2011. Some of the actions that the national plan focuses on include development of learner’s future skills, creation of pedagogical models and practices that utilise ICT in education, creations e-learning materials and applications, developing school infrastructure and support services, and providing teacher training and pedagogical expertise.

The same year, Finland’s mobile operators signed a code of conduct on safer mobile use by younger teenagers and children. This agreement falls under the umbrella of the European Union’s European Framework for Safer Mobile Use and includes such requirements as the need to offer access control restrictions where adult content is provided. Signatories to the Code take a commitment to raise awareness and promote education for children and parents on safer use of mobile phones and the internet. They also pledge to continue supporting the authorities in their fight against child pornography and to support state initiatives and legal mechanisms for restricting the distribution of illegal content.

2011 - The Digital Agenda for Finland 2011–2020 was drafted to promote growth and productivity in all areas of life, from the workplace and education to service use and leisure activities. It stresses that the use of ICT should be implemented in education from the earliest age. The agenda seeks to further develop the distance learning so that schools can offer a wider range of subjects and ensures the availability of fast broadband connections in all educational institutions, libraries and at public service points.

2015 - European Commission launched the [Assessment of Transversal Skills 2020 (ATS2020)])(http://www.ats2020.eu/) project in 11 EU countries, which will run through 2018. The project develops comprehensive learning model to enhance student transversal, 21st century skills across diverse EU national curricula, including the provision of teachers with modern approaches and innovative tools for the assessment of these skills. Foundation INNOVE is one of the 17 international partners of ATS 2020 that will be implementing the project in Estonian schools.

2016 - The Finnish Safer Internet Center (SIC), which consist of three partners National Audiovisual Institute, Mannerheim League for Child Welfare,and Save the Children Finland, celebrated Media Literacy Week (Finnish Safer Internet Day). The aim of the MLW is to advance the media and information literacy skills of children and youth, to encourage local institutions to arrange educational events, as well as to support educational professionals, parents and other adults in their important media educational duties. MLW 2016 conducted “What if the internet did not work?” campaign that discusses the meaning of networks and the internet in everyday life, and how intertwined everything when it comes to the web. In addition, the center launched a video “Moments online,” which encourages viewers to think and discuss what is the actual meaning of smartphones and mobile devices in our lives.

Finland introduced usage of ICT in the national curriculum in 2004. Starting August 2016, a new core curriculum for basic education will be implemented in all schools. The new curriculum encourages collaborative working and interaction and creative activity enhance learning, including usage of technology that enhance a better education.

European School Network

This group was founded in 2006 to create an exchange network among nine European schools. ESN arranges one-to-one student exchanges for one to eight weeks, and also provides the possibility of teacher exchanges, group exchanges and student seminars.

Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk (EGCC)

The group is the Children’s Unit at the Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat that aims to create safe and secure environment for children in the Baltic Sea Region by promoting cooperation on child rights and protection issues. The work is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international and regional conventions, recommendations and guidelines.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Europe

The ITU is is the UN agency for ICTs. Areas of focus in Europe include improving E-accessibility in Central and Eastern Europe, transitioning Europe to digital broadcasting, and sharing best practices for implementing e-applications.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

A Survey on the Transposition of Directive 2011/93/EU on Combating Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography (2016)

Together Against Sexual Exploitation of Children

The study examines how seven key provisions of Directive 2011/93/EU on the fight against sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography have been adopted by the 27 European Union (EU) Member States bound by the Directive.

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A Qualitative Exploratory Study Across Seven Countries (2015)

S. Chaudron

This report presents a pilot qualitative study designed and implemented in collaboration with a selected group of academic partners in different European countries that aims at pioneering in Europe the exploration of children younger than 8 years old and their families` experiences with new technologies.

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

The impact of internet and new media on the occurrence of violence against children in Europe and Cyprus (2015)

Rosella Sala

This document demonstrate that countries lack of expertise on child sexual exploitation and struggle combating this issue by their own. It suggests to establish an international legal framework to prosecute offenders and protect children.

Policy Influences and Country Clusters: A Comparative Analysis of Internet Safety Policy Implementation (2014)

B. O'Neill

The report examines the policy context of internet safety and looks at how countries within each cluster approach implementation.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Mapping Safer Internet Policies in the Member States (2014)

P. Baudouin, B. Mahieu, T. Dor, B. Good, J. Milayi, S. Nakajima

The purpose of the study was to set up a framework for analysing Better Internet for Children public policies covering EU Member States, and Norway and Iceland.

Country classification: opportunities, risks, harm and parental mediation (2013)

Helsper, E.J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B., and de Haan, J.

This report explores the range and type of online opportunities and risks experienced by children in each country. The ways in which parents mediate or regulate their children’s internet use is also examined.

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

In their own words: what bothers children online? (2013)

Livingstone S., Kirwil, L., Ponte C. and Staksrud E., with the EU Kids Online network

The results of a survey of nearly 10,000 children in 25 countries across Europe, this report details what children say upsets them and their friends online

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation (2013)

Helsper, E. J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B. and De Haan, J. with members of the EU Kids Online network

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

Excessive Internet Use by European Children (2012)

D. Smahel, E. Helsper, L. Green, V. Kalmus, L. Blinka, K. Ólafsson

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

EU Kids Online: Excessive Internet Use among European Children (2012)

Smahel, D, Helsper, E, Green, L, Kalmus, V, Blinka, L, Ólafsson, K,

This report uses the data from the EU Kids Online study to examine excessive use of the Internet by children in the 25 participating countries.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online: Finland (2012)

European Commission

Report on Finland's commitment to stop Child Sexual Abuse Online

Survey of schools: ICT in Education: Country Profile (2012)

European SchoolNet

Report on usage of ICT in Finnish education

The Protection of Children Online (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

Risks and safety on the internet: The perspective of European children. Full Findings (2011)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., Ólafsson, K

Building on the original study, EU Kids Online I, this second piece of research includes the findings from research which took place in 25 countries. Children in the 9 – 16 age group were surveyed on their experiences of online use, risk and safety

Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe (2009)

Eurydice

The study covers 30 European countries and provides information on whether online safety is taught and how it is taught in schools within the participating countries.

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU - a parents' perspective (2008)

Eurobarometer

The study covers 27 EU Member States and provides parental responses to a range of questions relating to Internet safety and their perception of risk.

E-learning Nordic 2006 - Impact of ICT on Education (2006)

The Nordic Ministries of Education and Ramboll Managements

The study focuses on the impact of ICT in education in three key areas: pupils’ performance; teaching and learning processes; knowledge-sharing, communication and home-school co-operation. More than 8000 persons from Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark participated in the study.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of simple majority in Finland is eighteen. The age of consent for sexual activity is sixteen and the age of consent for marriage is eighteen, however a person who is under 18 years of age can marry with special permission given by the Ministry of Justice.

2013 - The Parliament extends measure to volunteers when checking the criminal background of persons working with children, an act that has been in force since 2003. The act applies to all professions (public or private) where the worker is in close contact with children. This amendment entered into force 1 May 2014.

2014 - The provisions concerning sex offences in Finnish Criminal Code have been amended. All sex offences where the victim is under 18 years of age subject to public prosecution. The amendments of Criminal Code will enter into force 1 September 2014.

Finland has signed, ratified and entered into law the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (September 2007).

  • Section 18, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Distribution of Sexually Obscene Pictures. This section states that it is an offense to manufacture, offer for sale or for rent, export, import to or through Finland or otherwise distribute sexually obscene pictures or visual recordings depicting children, violence or bestiality. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for a maximum term of two years. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable. For the purpose of this section, a person under eighteen years of age and a person whose age cannot be determined but who can be justifiably assumed to be under eighteen is regarded as a child.
  • Section 18a, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Aggravated Distribution of Sexually Obscene Pictures Depicting Children. States that an increased penalty of imprisonment for a term between four months and six years will apply if the child depicted is particularly young; if the picture also shows violence or particularly humiliating treatment of the child; if the offense is committed in a particularly methodical matter or if the offense is committed by an organized gang. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 18b, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Illegal Exhibition or Distribution of Audiovisual Programs to a Minor. This section prescribes a penalty of imprisonment for a maximum term of six months for anyone who publicly exhibits or distributes audiovisual programs which have not been classified for exhibition or distribution under Section 8 of the Act on the Classification of Audiovisual Programs to a person under eighteen years of age, or unclassified programs to a person under eighteen.
  • Section 19, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Possession of Sexually Obscene Pictures Depicting Children. Defines the offense of unlawfully possessing a photograph, video, film or other realistic visual recording depicting a child under the age of eighteen having sexual intercourse or participating in a comparable sexual act, or in another obviously obscene manner. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to one year.
  • Section 20, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Unlawful Marketing of Obscene Material. States that anyone who, for gain, markets an obscene picture, visual recording or object which is conducive to causing public offense by giving it to a minor under fifteen years of age, putting it on public display, delivering it, unsolicited, to another person, openly offering it for sale or presenting it by advertisement, brochure, poster or any other means. The offender will be liable to imprisonment for up to six months.
  • Section 21, Chapter 17, Penal Code. Public Obscenity. This section states that anyone who publicly performs an obscene act which causes offense will be sentenced, unless a penalty for the act is laid down elsewhere in the law, to a fine or to imprisonment for up to six months.
  • Section 1, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Rape. Defines the offense of forcing another person into sexual intercourse by the use or threat of violence. The offender will be liable to imprisonment for a term between one to six years. The section also states that rape includes taking advantage of the incapacity of another person after rendering her/him unconscious or arousing the victim in a state of fear or similar nature, where she/he is incapable of defending herself or himself. Attempted rape is also punishable under this section.
  • Section 2, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Aggravated Rape. This section prescribes an increased penalty of imprisonment for a term between two to ten years for rape committed in the following circumstances: where the offender intentionally caused grievous bodily injury, serious illness or a state of mortal danger; where the offense is committed jointly by more than one person; where the offense is committed in a particularly brutal, cruel or humiliating manner; where a firearm, edged weapon or other lethal instrument is used or a threat of other serious violence is made. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 3, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Coercion into Sexual Intercourse. States that if the rape, in view of the slight degree of the violence or threat and the other particulars of the offense, is deemed to have been committed under mitigating circumstances when assessed as a whole, the offender is guilty of coercion into sexual intercourse and liable to imprisonment for a maximum of three years. The section also states that compelling another into sexual intercourse by a threat other than Section 1 (threat of violence) is also guilty of coercion into sexual intercourse. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 4, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Coercion into a Sexual Act. This section sets a penalty of imprisonment for a maximum of three years or a fine for anyone who, by violence or threat, coerces another into a sexual act other than intercourse, or into submission to such an act, thus essentially violating the victim’s right of sexual self-determination. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 5, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Sexual Abuse. Defines the offense of abusing a position and enticing one of the following into sexual intercourse, another sexual act or submission of such act, thereby violating the victim’s right of sexual self-determination: a person under the age of eighteen, who is subject to the authority or supervision of the offender in a school or other institution; a person under eighteen, who is classed as immature in terms of sexual self-determination due to his/her age compared to the other person involved, where the offender takes advantage of this immaturity; a hospitalized person or person in another institution, whose capacity to defend himself/herself is handicapped; a person who is especially dependent on the offender. The offense of sexual abuse is punishable by imprisonment for a maximum of four years. The section also states that the same sentence applies to anyone who takes advantage of the incapacity of another to defend himself, or to make or express a decision, due to unconsciousness, illness, handicap or other helplessness. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 6, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Sexual Abuse of a Child. This section states that anyone who has sexual intercourse with a child under the age of sixteen is guilty of sexual abuse of a child and liable to imprisonment for up to four years. It is also unlawful to perform a sexual act on a child under sixteen, by touching or otherwise, said act being conducive to impairing his or her development, or to induce the child to perform such an act. However, the section also states that no crime has been committed if there is no great difference in the ages or the mental and physical maturity of the persons involved. Attempted sexual abuse of a child is punishable under this section.
  • Section 7, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Aggravated Sexual Abuse of a Child. States that an increased penalty of imprisonment for at least one year and up to ten years will apply if the sexual abuse of a child: is committed on a child whose age or stage of development are such that the offense caused special injury to the victim; is committed in an especially humiliating manner; is contributing to causing the victim special injury due to the trust he/she has out in the offender, or due to the special dependence of the child on the offender. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 8, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Abuse of a Victim of Prostitution. Defines the offense of inducing a person to engage in sexual intercourse or a comparable act by promising or giving remuneration involving direct economic benefit. The offense is punishable with imprisonment for up to six months or a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who uses the sexual services of a person paid for by a third person. The attempt is punishable.
  • Section 8a, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Purchase of Sexual Services from a Young Person. This section states that anyone who, by promising or giving remuneration, induces a person younger than eighteen years of age to engage in sexual intercourse or to perform another sexual act is guilty of an offense and liable to a fine or imprisonment for at most one year. The section also states that the same penalty applies to anyone who uses the sexual services of a young person paid for by a third person. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 9, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Pandering. Defines the crime of providing a room or other facilities where sexual intercourse or a comparable sexual or obscene act performed by a child younger than eighteen years is offered for remuneration, in order to seek financial benefit. The offense is termed pandering and punishable by a fine or imprisonment for up to three years. Pandering also includes harboring a person engaging in sexual acts and thereby substantially promoting the act itself as an established part of the offender’s business, or providing contact information or otherwise marketing another person’s prostitution for financial gain. Otherwise taking advantage of the fact that another person engages in such an act, or tempting or coercing a person to engage in such an act is also classed as pandering and punishable as above. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 9a, Chapter 20, Penal Code. Aggravated Pandering. Sets an increased punishment of imprisonment for between four months to six years if, in pandering, considerable financial benefit is sought; the offense is committed in a particularly methodical manner; grievous bodily harm, a serious illness or a state of mortal danger or comparable particularly grave suffering is inflicted intentionally or through gross negligence on the victim; the victim is a child younger than eighteen years of age. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 8, Chapter 24, Penal Code. Dissemination of Information Violating Personal Privacy. This section states that anyone who disseminates information, an insinuation or an image of the private life of another person through the use of mass media or other means, making it available to many persons, and thereby causing the victim suffering or damage, or subjecting him to contempt, is guilty of an offense. The perpetrator will be punished by a fine or imprisonment for a maximum term of two years.
  • Section 9, Chapter 24, Penal Code. Defamation. States that anyone who spreads false information concerning another person or disparaging another person, causing damage or suffering to the victim or subjecting him to contempt will be liable to imprisonment for up to six months and a fine.
  • Section 10, Chapter 24, Penal Code. Aggravated Defamation. States that where defamation is committed by using mass media or otherwise by making the information or insinuation available to many persons, or where the defamation is considerable or causing long-lasting suffering, an aggravated sentence of imprisonment for a maximum term of two years or a fine will apply.
  • Section 3, Chapter 25, Penal Code. Trafficking in Human Beings. This section states that it is an offense to take control over another person, recruit, transfer, transport, receive or harbor a person for purposes of sexual abuse, forced labor or other demeaning circumstances, or the removal of bodily organs or tissue for financial benefit, by abusing the dependent or vulnerable state of another person; by deceiving the victim or by abusing a mistake made by that person; by paying remuneration to a person who has control over the victim; or by accepting such remuneration. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for a term of between four months to six years. The section also states that anyone who takes control over a person under eighteen years of age or recruits, transfers, transports, receives or harbors that person for the purposes mentioned above will be sentenced as above, even if none of the means referred to above have been used. Attempts to commit this offense are also punishable.
  • Section 3a, Chapter 25, Penal Code. Aggravated Trafficking in Human Beings. Prescribes an increased penalty of imprisonment for between two to ten years if, in human trafficking, violence, threats or deceitfulness were used; grievous bodily harm, a serious illness or a state of mortal danger or comparable particularly grave suffering is inflicted on the victim intentionally or through gross negligence; the victim is under the age of eighteen or incapable of defending himself; the offense has been committed by an organized gang. The section also states that anyone who enslaves or keeps another person in servitude, transports or trades in slaves, will be sentenced as detailed above. Attempted trafficking in human beings is also punishable.

2002 - Save the Children Finland developed Nettivihje (hotline), which offers the public a way to report potential illegal online content, especially concerning Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM). In addition to reports of online child sexual abuse material, the hotline receives reports regarding racism and xenophobia and extreme adult content. As a member of IHOPE, Nettivihje works closely with law enforcement to remove child sexual abuse material from the Internet. Between 2003 and 2014, the hotline has processed 55,373 reports referring to potentially illegal material, of which 39 % have been assessed as illegal.

2012 - Finland joined the Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online along with 54 countries around the world. The Alliance unites Ministers of the Interior and of Justice from each country to fight against Child Sexual Abuse Online, to rescue victims, to develop more effective prosecution, and to reduce the amount of child sexual abuse images available online.

2013 - The National Institute for Health and Welfare launched a campaign against sexual violence that targeted young people and made use of electronic media, which runs under the name “Mun kroppa. Mä päätän” (My body. It’s my decision). The campaign raises awareness among children and adolescents about sexual violence and how to protect themselves from it. The campaign was also carried out by the police by visiting in the schools and different events, guiding children to explore material produced by campaign.

2014 - Nettivihje became a partner in the BIK NET (Better Internet for Kids Network Pilot) project, and piloted a new technical solution IC-CAM (I see Child Abuse material) to enhance the processing of potentially illegal material. In March 2015, Nettivihje processed nearly 13,000 images and videos through IC CAM which referred to potentially illegal material.

2015 - Officer from the Finnish Police Force participated in the 16th Europol training course on “Combating the Sexual Exploitation of Children on the Internet” (COSEC), which was held in Germany .This ten-day course provided training for 63 representatives from EU Member States, non-EU States, and Interpol.

The same year, Otanvastuun.fi(I take responsibility) won the 2015 Council for Crime Prevention Award, which is given to projects that prevent hacking, fraud or online child sexual abuse. The website was created based on Stop it now-material, it provides online self-help material for those linked to illegal online sexual activity targeting children and the possible consequences of such activity.