Czech Republic

Population

10,644,841

Population 0‑14

15.0%

Internet Users

79.7%

Facebook Users

4,500,000

Mobile Subscribers

1,400,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2006 - The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MEYS) has been working to enable every school in the Czech Republic to receive high-speed Internet access through its Internet in every School program. The program is working to equip all Czech schools with the necessary hardware and DSL access. Another area of investment of the Ministry is co-financing teachers’ notebook computers to enable them to use modern technologies whilst working from home and for further training in the field of ICT. In addition, the MEYS offers teacher training in ICT, aiming to further educate at least two teachers per school in the field of ICT.

2007 - The Framework Education Programs (FEP) lays out curriculum for Secondary General Education (SGE)](http://www.msmt.cz/uploads/Vzdelavani/Skolska_reforma/RVP/RVP_gymnazia.pdf) where teaching of [Information Science and Information and Communication Technologies is implemented. Internet safety is regarded as an integral part of the set curriculum for secondary school students. The FEP SGE, among other requirements, sets the following expected outcomes of students’ ICT competencies: assess topicality, relevance and reliability of information resources and information, creatively, and utilize information and communication services in accordance with ethical, safety and legislative requirements. In addition, the position of ICT within the curricula is defined not only as an independent school subject but also as a tool for solving problems and as a basis for creating an educational environment.

2008 - Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the MEYS and Intel to implement Intel® Teach™ Program to helps teachers understand how, when and where to bring technology tools and resources into their classrooms, as well as establish 1:1 eLearning environments, implemented through 2015, in which children can develop the 21st century knowledge and skills they need to succeed in today’s global economy.

2009 - The Ministry published a detailed plan for implementing ICT in education sector for the period 2009 – 2013: Akční plán Škola (Action Plan School for the 21st Century). The plan describes several targets for ICT in education and identifies financial resources to implement reforms in schools, including the establishment of interactive online educational portal, offering teaching resources and the means to exchange ideas and views for educational staff and students alike. To date, teachers in the Czech Republic have access to two educational websites: the teacher portal RVP (Rámcový Vzdělávací Program – Framework Education Program) where teachers would “gather” and share their experiences, know-how, and motivation, and Metodik.cz, a website offering pedagogical e-learning support.

2011 - Online Safety Institute (OSI), founded in 2006, official became the National Center for Safer Internet (NCBI). Currently, the organization works to implement online safety projects initiated by the European Commission, including Safer Internet SIC CZ, Mladí proti nenávisti online (No Hate Speech Movement), eSafety Label, POSCON, Grundvig, and [Miracle)http://www.ncbi.cz/evropska-komise/miracle.html).

2012 - European Commission launched eTwinning in Czech Republic, a European school community program that brings together schools and kindergartens from all over Europe cooperating with the electronic media.

2013 - To raise awareness about the risks of the Internet the Association of Czech Regions launched Counties Internet Security project. The project provides online quizzes and courses, created by NCBI and Higher Police School of the Ministry of Interior in Prague, for children and youth, parents and the public, workers at police and social workers to learn how to stay safe online.

2014 - NCBI launched Prague securely online project, an educational and cultural project to prevent electronic violence and cyber crime in four Prague districts. Each district received specialized training for professionals, held awareness seminars for parents, and set up primary prevention workshops for children in schools.

2016 - NCBI organized Safer Internet Day across Czech Republic, where a press conference held between ministries and representatives of regions to promote online safety. Two competitions were held one for those that are taking part in Safer Internet Day and the second one is a creative competition for children about online safety. Children’s University held a workshop for children aged 8-12 years under focusing on safer use of the Internet and mobile technologies. The lecture implemented a project team E-Safety in cooperation with O2 Czech Republic and the Czech Police.

Alik.cz

This website is aimed at younger children and provides links to other child-friendly websites, suggests safe online games to play and provides a forum where children can interact safely online.

Bezpecne-online.cz

A websie for all who is interestd to learn more about internet safety. The website provides tips for parents, teacher, and students on safety of internet and how to prevent exposure to illegal content online.

Bílý kruh bezpečí (BKB)

A non-governmental organization providing crime victims and witnesses with professional, free of charge, confidential support.

Canee.net

An interactive center for professionals working in the field of child abuse and neglect prevention and intervention in Eastern Europe. It was created in 2001, the website was designed to build upon and promote the professional networks established by the Eastern European Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program.

Center for International Services (Dům zahraničních služeb (DZS))

Established by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport of the Czech Republic, the organization performs tasks involved with ensuring educational, training and other relations with foreign countries under the instructions of the ministry. DZS services are aimed at both individuals, students, teachers, directors of all types of schools and other professionals, and organisations and companies involved in education and local authorities and, last but not least, also the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport.

CSIRT.CZ

A National CSIRT (Computer Security Incident Response Team) Czech Republic is a security team that coordinates the resolution of security incidents in computer networks operated in the Czech Republic. Security team operated by the Association CZ.NIC,Czech national domain administrator, on the basis of public service contracts concluded in December 2015 with the National Security Agency as coordinator for cyber security issues.

e-Security

The project e-Security aims to identify and analyze unsafe practices linked to electronic communication. Aimed specifically at children aged six to fifteen, the website hosts vast amounts of information about cyber-stalking, cyber-grooming, sexting and cyberbullying. Special sections for teachers and parents include valuable tips and ideas related to educating children and teenagers in the safe use of new technologies.

GSMA Europe

This industry association represents the interests of European mobile network operators. The group engages in lobbying in areas such as children’s use of mobile phones, privacy, digital inclusion and reducing the digital gender gap. In 2008, the organization formed a mobile alliance against child sexual abuse content.

Horka Linka

Horka Linka provides the means for anonymous reporting of harmful and illegal content and is a member of INHOPE. It deals with reports of child sexual abuse and exploitation, child pornography, child trafficking, unsuitable content, racism, extremism, hate speech, violence, drugs, self-destruction and suicide. The Hotline collaborates with stakeholders, such as ISPs, cell phone operators and representatives IT industry to achieve this goal.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Europe

The ITU is is the UN agency for ICTs. Areas of focus in Europe include improving E-accessibility in Central and Eastern Europe, transitioning Europe to digital broadcasting, and sharing best practices for implementing e-applications.

Internet Governance Forum

The IGF was founded by the UN in 2006 to serve as a discussion platform for internet governance policy issues. It brings together various stakeholders to determine best practices for internet policy. Past areas of focus include cybersecurity, human rights, inclusivity and openness.

Internet Helpline

Children and adolescents can report suspicious websites by contacting a 24-hour free phone number where they can speak to trained consultants. Basic information for children and adolescents explaining how to protect themselves from harmful online content is also available on this website.

Internet Hotline

Internet Hotline is operated by Our Child Foundation, in conjunction with funds from partners and sponsors, and is a member of INHOPE. The site provides a means to report suspected illegal content and works with the police were reported content is suspected to be in breach of the country’s laws. In addition to the reporting function, the site offers safety advice for children, teenagers and concerned members of the public.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Minimize Bullying

This project deals with traditional as well as online bullying, and has sections for parents, teachers and pupils, offering guidance and advice for victims of bullying. Stories by victims give an insight of how much damage it can cause, and parents are educated in how to spot whether their child is being bullied, or whether he/she is bullying others.

Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MEYS)

The Ministry is responsible for public administration in education, for developing educational, youth and sport policies and international cooperation in these fields.

Ministry of Interior of Czech Republic

The ministry is supreme office for the realms of public administration, internal security, border protection and eGovernment in the Czech Republic.

MobilStory.cz

NGO works in partnership with Microsoft, providing children and their parents with information about cell phones, Internet safety and inappropriate content.

National Agency for European Educational Programmes (NAEP)

Established under DZS, the agency is responsible for implementation of the Lifelong Learning Programme and other educational programmes in the Czech Republic. NAEP provides promotion of educational programmes, assistance and consultancy services, management of funds and contracts for decentralized actions, monitoring, dissemination and valorisation, organisation of seminars and conferences.

National Center for Safer Internet (NCBI)

A nonprofit non governmental association founded in 2007. Its mission is to contribute to increasing the safety of use of the Internet, modern information and communication technologies, increasing users’ awareness of their strengths and potential hazards contribute to the acquisition of ethical standards in line environment, prevent and help reduce the potential social risks associated with their use.

Online Safety Institute

The Institute was established in December 2006 with objective to create a documentary unit and coordination centre of the safer Internet studies. One important goal of the Institute is to increase awareness of the advantages and threats of online communication, contribute to Internet literacy, shaping and implementation of ethical norms and codes of conduct on the Internet. The Institute carries out projects contributing to the increase of online safety and supports the cooperation of law enforcement agencies, public administration, industry, educational institutions and NGOs in the field of online safety.

Police of the Czech Republic Hotline

A hotline service where internet users can report racial or ethnic intolerance, swindling, child pornography, or other symptoms that may appear as a crime in the user view.

Prevent Cyberbullying

This website focuses solely on the issue of cyberbullying, with videos about the subject and help and advice for those who may be affected by it.

Safer Internet

Launched in 2009, Safer Internet strives to enhance Internet users’ awareness of possible online threats, and to establish and run a Hotline (Horka Linka) for notification of illegal and harmful content, especially sexual child abuse and bullying. The project supports self-regulation initiatives, commitment to create a safer online environment for children and to learn new things about latest trends in the use of online technologies and their impacts on children’s lives.

A Survey on the Transposition of Directive 2011/93/EU on Combating Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography (2016)

Together Against Sexual Exploitation of Children

The study examines how seven key provisions of Directive 2011/93/EU on the fight against sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography have been adopted by the 27 European Union (EU) Member States bound by the Directive.

Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A Qualitative Exploratory Study Across Seven Countries (2015)

S. Chaudron

This report presents a pilot qualitative study designed and implemented in collaboration with a selected group of academic partners in different European countries that aims at pioneering in Europe the exploration of children younger than 8 years old and their families` experiences with new technologies.

How parents of young children manage digital devices at home: the role of income, education and parental style (2015)

Livingstone, Sonia, Mascheroni, Giovanna, Dreier, Michael, Chaudron, Stephane, Lagae, Kaat

The report compares strategies of parental mediation on the internet according to levels of parental education and household income. The aim was to inform policy-makers and practitioners on how to approach parental guidance and awareness raising.

The impact of internet and new media on the occurrence of violence against children in Europe and Cyprus (2015)

Rosella Sala

This document demonstrate that countries lack of expertise on child sexual exploitation and struggle combating this issue by their own. It suggests to establish an international legal framework to prosecute offenders and protect children.

Combatting Child Sexual Abuse (2015)

Petra Jeney

The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse, as well as the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives.

Global Research Project: A Global Landscape of Hotlines Combating Child Sexual Abuse Material on the Internet and an Assessment of Shared Challenges (2015)

Melissa Stroebe, Stacy Jeleniewski, PhD

This report examines hotlines combating Internet-facilitated Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Policy Influences and Country Clusters: A Comparative Analysis of Internet Safety Policy Implementation (2014)

B. O'Neill

The report examines the policy context of internet safety and looks at how countries within each cluster approach implementation.

Final recommendations for policy (2014)

O’Neill, B., Staksrud, E

Combining all the EU Kids Online policy guidance into one resource, this report provides more than 30 proposed actions for making the Internet safer for children.

Children's Use of Online Technologies in Europe (2014)

K. Ólafsson, S. Livingstone, L. Haddon

This report reviews recent research on children’s use of internet and mobile technologies identified by the EU Kids Online network.

The Meaning of Online Problematic Situations for Children: Results of Qualitative Cross-Cultural Investigation in Nine European Countries (2014)

D. Smahel, M.F. Wright

This research, based on interviews, focused on the following: what children perceive as being potentially negative or problematic while using the internet, what risks children are aware of when using the internet, what consequences online negative experiences might have, how children react to negative experiences, what children do to avoid or prevent these problematic experiences, and why children perceive certain situations as negative.

Mapping Safer Internet Policies in the Member States (2014)

P. Baudouin, B. Mahieu, T. Dor, B. Good, J. Milayi, S. Nakajima

The purpose of the study was to set up a framework for analysing Better Internet for Children public policies covering EU Member States, and Norway and Iceland.

Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online: Czech Republic (2014)

European Commission

This reports on Czech Republic's commitment to stop Child Sexual Abuse Online.

Zero to Eight - Young Children and Their Internet Use (2013)

Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. with members of the EU Kids Online network,

This report reviews a number of other studies and provides recommendations as to how younger children can be protected from online risks.

Overview and Analysis of 1:1 Learning Initiatives in Europe (2013)

Intel

Intel 's report on the status of 1:1 Learning Initiative in Europe

Country Classification: Opportunities, Risks, Harm and Parental Mediation (2013)

Helsper, E. J., Kalmus, V., Hasebrink, U., Sagvari, B. and De Haan, J. with members of the EU Kids Online network

With data from 25 of the European countries surveyed in EU Kids Online, the report examines the range and type of online opportunities, risks and harm which children from each country experience, as well as looking at ways in which parents control or mediate their children’s Internet use.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

In their own words: what bothers children online? (2013)

Livingstone S., Kirwil, L., Ponte C. and Staksrud E., with the EU Kids Online network

The results of a survey of nearly 10,000 children in 25 countries across Europe, this report details what children say upsets them and their friends online

EU Kids Online: National perspectives. (2012)

Leslie Haddon, Sonia Livingstone and the EU Kids Online network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey. (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Report on risks faced by children online and policies to protect them (2012)

Kristina Irion

The report provides key findings and policy recommendations to keep children safe online as a follow up to the 2008 Seoul Ministerial Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy.

EU Kids Online: National perspectives (2012)

Haddon, L., Livingstone, S., EU Kids Online Network

This report summarizes the Internet experiences of children in the 33 participating EU Kids Online countries and includes eight countries which have not appeared in previous reports.

ECPAT Global Monitoring Report: Czech Republic (2012)

ECPAT

Report on the status of action against commercial sexual exploitation of children in Czech Republic

EU Kids Online: Excessive Internet Use among European Children (2012)

Smahel, D, Helsper, E, Green, L, Kalmus, V, Blinka, L, Ólafsson, K,

This report uses the data from the EU Kids Online study to examine excessive use of the Internet by children in the 25 participating countries.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Excessive Internet Use by European Children (2012)

D. Smahel, E. Helsper, L. Green, V. Kalmus, L. Blinka, K. Ólafsson

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children.

Risks and safety on the internet: The perspective of European children. Full Findings (2011)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., Ólafsson, K

Building on the original study, EU Kids Online I, this second piece of research includes the findings from research which took place in 25 countries. Children in the 9 – 16 age group were surveyed on their experiences of online use, risk and safety

EU Kids Online: Final report (2009)

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L.

One of the foremost pieces of research into the online habits of children in the European Union is the EU Kids Online research, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Plus Programme between 2006 and 2009.

Education on Online Safety in Schools in Europe (2009)

Eurydice

The study covers 30 European countries and provides information on whether online safety is taught and how it is taught in schools within the participating countries.

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU - a parents' perspective (2008)

Eurobarometer

The study covers 27 EU Member States and provides parental responses to a range of questions relating to Internet safety and their perception of risk.

Teenagers’ Actions and Interactions Online in Central and Eastern Europe. Potentials and Empowerment, Risks and Victimization (2007)

Monica Barbovschi and Maria Diaconescu

The report provides an insight into various issues related to teenagers’ actions and interactions online in Central and Eastern Europe: potentials for skills development, youth empowerment, as well as risks of online aggressive behaviors and victimization effects of the online environment.

U.S. /European Summit on Missing & Exploited Children (2005)

International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children

Participants from different governments, law enforcement, and nongovernmental organizations participated in the U.S. /European Summit on Missing & Exploited Children. They discussed successes and shortcomings of current efforts to address the global problem of missing and exploited children, and adopted a comprehensive Action Plan.

Safer Internet for Children and Adolescents in the new Member States. Full Report (2004)

Eurobarometer

This report covers the ten accession countries of the time: Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

In the Czech Republic, the legal age of majority is eighteen years. The age of consent for sexual activity is fifteen years, and the age of consent for marriage is eighteen.

The Czech Republic has signed, but not ratified the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime (November 2001).

  • Article 146, Penal Code. Bodily Harm. This section states that anyone who intentionally causes bodily harm to another person will be punished with imprisonment for between six months and three years. An increased sentence of between one and five years’ imprisonment is imposed where the crime was committed against (among other classifications of victim) a child under the age of fifteen. Where the offense resulted in serious bodily harm, the sentence increases to between two and eight years’ imprisonment, or between five and ten years’ imprisonment where the crime caused the death of the victim.
  • Article 168, Penal Code. Trafficking. This article defines the crime of trafficking children. A sentence of imprisonment for between two and ten years applies to anyone who causes, induces, hires, entices, transports, hides or detains a child given to him by another person for one of the following reasons: for sexual intercourse or other forms of sexual abuse or harassment, or to produce pornographic material; to remove tissue from the child’s body; to enslave the child or make him/her a servant; to enroll the child in the armed forces; to force the child to work or exploit him/her in any other way. The article also states that where the act was committed by an organized group, or where it caused serious bodily harm, the sentence will increase to between five and twelve years’ imprisonment and forfeiture of any assets gained as a result of the crime. Where the offense caused severe injury to the victim, or where the act was committed by an organized group operating in several states, an aggravated sentence of imprisonment for between eight and fifteen years and the forfeiture of assets will apply. The offender is liable to imprisonment for between ten and eighteen years if the victim dies.
  • Article 171, Penal Code. Restriction of Personal Freedom. States that anyone who deprives another person of their personal freedom without authorization will be punished with imprisonment for up to two years. An increased sentence of imprisonment for up to three years applies if the offender committed the crime to facilitate another offense. The article also states that if the crime was committed on the basis of the victim’s actual or perceived race, ethnic group, nationality, political belief, religion or because they appear to be atheist, or by a member of an organized group, the sentence will increase to between two and eight years’ imprisonment. The same sentence applies where the offender caused grievous bodily harm to the victim. An increased sentence of imprisonment for between three and ten years will apply if the offense resulted in the death of the victim.
  • Article 175, Penal Code. Blackmail. Defines the offense of using force, threat of violence or threat of another severe injury to force someone to do or refrain from doing something. The offender is liable to imprisonment for between six months and four years, or a fine. The article also states that an aggravated sentence of imprisonment for between two and eight years will apply to anyone who commits such an act as a member of an organized group; with at least one other person; with a weapon; on the basis of the victim’s actual or perceived race, ethnic group, nationality, political belief, religion or they appear to be atheist or where the act caused considerable damage. The offender is liable to a sentence of imprisonment for between five and twelve years where the act caused grievous bodily harm, or if it caused damage on a large scale. Where the offense caused the death of the victim, the sentence increases to between eight and sixteen years’ imprisonment.
  • Article 184, Penal Code. Defamation. This article states that anyone who disseminates false information about another person which could potentially damage the victim’s reputation, especially in the workplace, disrupt their family relations or cause any other serious damage, will be punished by imprisonment for up to one year. An increased sentence of imprisonment for up to two years will apply if the false information was disseminated through the press, film, radio or television, publicly accessible computer networks or any other similarly effective means. In addition, a restraining order or injunction will be issued.
  • Article 185, Penal Code. Rape. Defines the offense of using violence, threat of violence or threat of another severe injury to force a person to have sexual intercourse, or abusing the person’s helpless state to have intercourse. The offense is punishable with imprisonment for between six months and eight years. The article also states that the offense is punishable with an aggravated sentence of imprisonment for a term of between two and ten years in the following cases: where the intercourse or other sexual contact was carried out in a manner similar to having sex; where the victim was a child or where weapons were used. The sentence shall be further increased to imprisonment for between five and twelve years where the victim is a child under fifteen years of age; where the offense was committed against a person in custody, prison, protective treatment, detention, institutional care or another place where their personal freedom was restricted or where the offense caused serious injury to the victim. The article also states that the offender is liable to imprisonment for between ten and eighteen years where the act caused the death of the victim. Attempted rape is also punishable.
  • Article 186, Penal Code. Sexual Coercion. States that it is an offense to force another person to masturbate, strip or commit other comparable acts by using force, threat of violence or threat of another severe injury, or by abusing the victim’s vulnerability. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for between six months and four years and a restraining order or injunction will be entered. The article also states that where the victim is a child or where the act was committed jointly by more than one perpetrator, the sentence will increase to imprisonment for between one and five years. Furthermore, the offender will be liable to imprisonment for between two and eight years in the following cases: where weapons were used; where the offense was committed against a person in custody, prison, protective treatment, detention, institutional care or another place where their personal freedom was restricted; where the act was committed by a member of an organized group. If the act was committed on a child under fifteen years of age, or where it caused serious bodily harm to the victim, the offender will be punished by imprisonment for between five and twelve years. The article also states that the offender is liable to imprisonment for between ten and sixteen years where the act caused the death of the victim. Attempted sexual coercion is also punishable.
  • Article 187, Penal Code. Sexual Abuse. Defines the crime of performing sexual intercourse with a child under fifteen years of age or sexually abusing the child in any other way. The offender will be punished by imprisonment for between one and eight years. The perpetrator is liable to an increased sentence of imprisonment for between two and ten years if he was entrusted with the child’s supervision, abusing the victim’s dependency. The article also states that if the offense inflicted serious injury on the victim, the sentence will increase to between five and twelve years’ imprisonment. Where the offense causes the death of the victim, imprisonment for between ten and eighteen years will be imposed. Attempted sexual abuse is also punishable.
  • Article 189, Penal Code. Pimping. This section states that anyone who hires, induces or entices someone into prostitution is liable to a term of imprisonment of between six months and four years. In addition, assets gained as the result of benefiting from another’s prostitution may be forfeit. The same sentence applies to anyone who preys on prostitutes under the control of another. The article also states that the offender is liable to an aggravated sentence of imprisonment for between two and eight years if the crime was committed with the intent to acquire a significant benefit for himself or another person, or as a member of an organized group. A term of imprisonment of between five and twelve years or forfeiture of assets gained will apply where the act caused serious bodily harm to the victim. Where the act caused the death of the victim, the sentence will increase to between eight and fifteen years’ imprisonment or forfeiture of property.
  • Article 191, Penal Code. Dissemination of Pornography. States that anyone who produces, imports, exports, transits, offers, makes publicly available, arranges, puts into circulation, sells or otherwise distributes pornographic written works, sound or picture recordings, pictures or any other material depicting violence and disrespect of the persons featured, or sexual intercourse with animals, will be punished by imprisonment for up to one year. In addition, assets gained as the result of any of the above actions may be forfeit. The article also states that a sentence of imprisonment for up to two years and the forfeiture of assets gained from the offense will apply to anyone who offers, makes available or leaves to a child pornographic writings, images, movies, computer, electronic or any other material. Where the offense was committed as part of an organized group or with the intent to acquire a significant benefit for himself or another person, the sentence will be increased to imprisonment for between six months and three years. The same sentence applies if the act was committed through print media, television or radio, publicly accessible computer networks or by other similarly effective means. Where the offense was committed by a member of an organized group operating in several states, or with the intent to acquire a benefit of a large scale for himself or a third person, the offender will be liable to an increased sentence of imprisonment for between one and five years.
  • Article 192, Penal Code. Production and other Handling of Child Pornography. Defines the crime of possessing pornographic sound or picture recordings, computer or other electronic material, or any other material depicting a child. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to two years. The article also states that anyone who produces, imports, exports, transits, offers, makes publicly available, arranges, puts into circulation, sells or otherwise distributes pornographic written works, sound or picture recordings, pictures or any other material depicting a child, or anyone who preys on such pornographic works, will be punished by imprisonment for between six months and three years, and any assets gained as the result of any of the actions above will be forfeit. An increased sentence of imprisonment for between two and six years and the forfeiture of any assets gained as a result of the crime will apply where the offense was committed (a) as part of an organized group, (b) through the media of print, television or radio, publicly accessible computer networks or by other similarly effective means, or (c) with the intent to acquire a significant benefit for himself or a third person. Imprisonment for between three and eight years and the forfeiture of any assets gained as a result of the crime shall apply where the offense was committed by a member of an organized group operating in several states, or with the intent to acquire a benefit of a large scale for the offender himself or a third person.
  • Article 193, Penal Code. Abuse of a Child to Produce Pornography. This section states that anyone who hires, induces, entices or abuses a child to produce pornographic works will be punished by imprisonment for between one and five years. Where the offense was committed by a member of an organized group, or with the intent to acquire a significant benefit for himself or a third person, the offender is liable to an increased sentence of between two and six years’ imprisonment. Where the offense was committed by a member of an organized group operating in several states, or with the intent to acquire a benefit of a large scale for himself or a third person, the sentence will be increased to imprisonment for between three and eight years.
  • Article 209, Penal Code. Fraud. This article defines the offense of enriching oneself through someone else’s error or mistake, or by concealing facts and thereby causing damage to the victim’s possessions. The offense is punishable by imprisonment for up to two years, and any assets gained as a result of the crime will be forfeit.
  • Article 352, Penal Code. Violence Against a Group of Individuals. States that anyone who uses violence against a group of people, threatens them with death, bodily harm or other serious injuries will be punished by imprisonment for up to one year. The article also states that where the offense was committed on the basis of the victim’s actual or perceived race, ethnic group, nationality, political belief, religion or because they are or appear to be atheist, the sentence will be increased to imprisonment for between six months and three years.
  • Article 353, Penal Code. Dangerous Threats. Defines the crime of threatening another person with death, serious injury or any other severe injuries in a way that causes legitimate cause for concern. The offender is liable to imprisonment for up to one year and a restraining order or injunction will be issued. The sentence will increase to up to three years’ imprisonment and a restraining order or injunction will be issued if the offense was committed against a pregnant woman or a child, or where a weapon was used.
  • Article 354, Penal Code. Stalking. This section defines the offense of harassment as (over a period of time) threatening the victim or someone close to them; surveying the victim or making attempts to stay physically close to them (whether through electronic means or written or oral communication) which causes the victim daily limitations to their usual way of life. It also states that it is an offense to misuse the victim’s personal data in order to make personal or other contact with them. Where such actions cause the victim to be in justifiable fear for their safety or health or the safety or health of those close to them, the offender is liable to punishment by imprisonment for up to one year. If the acts specified previously are committed against pregnant women or children, or involve the use of weapons or two or more offenders, the crime is punishable by imprisonment for between six months and three years. In addition, a restraining order or injunction may be issued against the offender.

2006 - Ministry of Interior published a National Plan for Combating Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children 2006 - 2008 (“CSEC NPA”) to fight against child prostitution, child trafficking, and child pornography.

2007 - Through 2012, Our Child Foundation operated the first Czech Internet Hotline in cooperation with the public, the Police and Internet service providers. Its aim was to decrease the spread of child pornography and other illegal content online. Czech President signed a law that illegalizes possession of child pornography, as well as raises the maximum jail sentence for producing and distributing child pornography from three to eight years.

2008 - Czech mobile operators signed an Agreement on Implementation of National Self-Regulation. The agreement is part of a wider European Union Framework for Safer Mobile Use by Younger Teenagers and Children which was signed by an initial fifteen signatories in February 2007. The Czech agreement includes undertakings such as the classification of content provided by the operators and commitments to conduct awareness-raising exercises around the safe use of mobile devices by children. As of April 2010, there are 83 signatory companies implementing the Framework through the roll-out of national voluntary agreements.

The Czech Government adopted the National Strategies for Prevention of Violence against Children in the Czech Republic (2008 - 2018).The plan focuses on violence prevention, creating safe communities, the development of parenting skills, fostering dialogues between children in schools and the workplace, protecting the rights of children placed in institutional care, and “facilitating understanding of the law to protect children from violence.”

2009 - Horka Linka was established by Safer Internet as a reporting mechanism for the public regarding potentially illegal online content, including, but not limited to, child sexual abuse material, child sex trafficking, bullying, self harm, and racism. As of 2015, Horka Linka has received over 15,000 reports regarding prohibited material. Horka Linka is an active member of INHOPE.

2010 - Our Children Foundation implemented Children’s Rights Support Project to raise awareness about children’s rights in primary schools and young people’s rights and obligations. A website for children was developed, where children can learn about their rights through various online games and quizzes, as well as it contains necessary telephone numbers for children who seek help or advice.

2011 - Along with 54 countries, Czech Republic has joined the Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online. The Alliance unites Ministers of the Interior and of Justice from each country to fight against Child Sexual Abuse Online, to rescue victims, to develop more effective prosecution, and to reduce the amount of child sexual abuse images available online.

The Czech police initiated a specialized anti-child pornography operation “Tabor” (Czech for “camp”), which resulted in a raid of over 30 homes in 12 of the 14 districts of Czech Republic confiscating 60 computers. The convicted were charged for the distribution and the production of child pornography.

The Ministry of Justice submitted to the Government a law proposal that implements a directive of the EU Parliament and the Council 2011/93/EU on combating child sexual abuse, child sexual exploitation and child pornography. The law proposes a punishment for a participation in a pornographic performance including a child, adds a subject matter that provides for a required criminal intentionality of the act, where an adult individual proposes a meeting with sexually immature children via information or communication technologies with the aim to perpetrate a criminal offence of sexual abuse, or related. Additionally, it adds a punishment for a deliberate approach to child pornography via information or communication technologies and inclusion of further offences within the criminal liability of legal persons law, of which a legal person may be prosecuted for rape, participation in a pornographic performance and facilitation of prohibited contact with a child.

2015 - Czech Republic hosted a two-day meeting in Prague where Insafe network of Safer Internet Centres exchanged knowledge and experience about online issues and trends, discussed what the future of technology holds and how it may impact the work of Awareness Centres and Helplines in Europe. The 16th Europol training course on ‘Combating the Online Sexual Exploitation of Children on the Internet’ (COSEC) This ten-day course provided training for 63 representatives from EU Member States, non-EU States and Interpol. The training was delivered by police trainers from Europol, Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Italy, New Zealand, Portugal, and Ireland.