Brazil

Population

204,259,812

Population 0‑14

23.3%

Internet Users

57.6%

Facebook Users

103,000,000

Mobile Subscribers

266,900,000
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

Brazil’s Ministry of Education works consistently to raise standards in schools, and as part of UNESCO’s Education For All movement, Brazil is noted as one of the Champion Countries.

2006 - The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program was launched in Brazil and the first 65 XO laptops were distributed. The main provider of handheld devices to the Government of Brazil is Intel, through their Classmate PC program. In 2012, 176,000 PCs were purchased and distributed to students in their final two years of high school in public schools throughout the Brazilian state of Pernambuco.

2008 - UNICEF and British Telecom launched an ‘edu-communication’ program targeting low-income communities. The program aimed to provide young people in the country with communication tools to improve the quality of their education, both in schools and wider communities. The initiative aimed to reach some 10,000 young people, training them in peer to peer communication and the use of technology and digital skills to impact school-improvement campaigns as well as overarching public policies like health services, the environment, and ongoing digital inclusion.

Brazil’s Ministry of Education also launched the Broadband Program, for which the aim was to connect all public schools to the Internet, through technologies that increased public education in the country. The goal was to connect all urban public schools by the year 2010, and to make the service free of charge by the year 2025.

2009 - Brazil participated in Dia da Internet Segura (Safer Internet Day) with a workshop for educators, on the subject of navigating the Internet safely through the ethical use of new technologies. The workshop was promoted by federal prosecutors in Sao Paulo and the State Department of Education in Sao Paulo. Dia da Internet Segura is still celebrated annually with activities all over Brazil.

The Ministry of Education created a secure portal for teachers, Portal do Professor, containing educational resources and allowing for the exchange of ideas and best practice. It also provides information for teaching staff about ICT and using the Internet as a teaching resource. Furthermore, it offers guides to teach students about the danger of internet and its responsible usage.

In addition, there are organizations such as SaferNet, an NGO which operates in partnership with the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), and the Ministry itself working in conjunction with companies such as Google and Microsoft to run workshops in schools.

2010 - Ericsson has joined with the Earth Institute at Columbia University and Millennium Promise to create Connect to Learn. This program uses technology with the three primary aims of: implementing low-cost and easy-to-use ICT for schools, enabling access for students and teachers to information and educational resources, and connecting schools to others around the world in order to foster collaborative learning, cross-cultural understanding, and global awareness. In Brazil, the initiative has provided broadband access to rural and disadvantaged areas.

2011 - The Telefónica Foundation’s EducaRede portal provided information to educators across Brazil. They benefited from a wide range of articles focusing on the use of ICT in education, such as how to incorporate microblogging through sites such as Twitter into the classroom. Aspects of the portal were disabled in 2013, but much of the content is still available as a heritage resource.

2012 - According to CETIC.br’s ICT Education 2012 Report, 7% of Brazilian public schools had computers in the classroom, with 26% in private schools. In the 2010, School Census reported that 60.45% of schools in Brazil owned computers. ICT use among teachers in Brazil is high, with 89% of teachers in 2011 having computer access at home, 82% of whom used them every day.

A program aimed at the general public is Project Connected – Computers for All (Projeto Cidadão Conectado – Computador para Todos). The project aims to promote digital inclusion by offering consumers the opportunity to purchase IT products. Moreover, consumers also have the possibility of utilizing a special credit agreement through the Caixa Economica Federal and Banco do Brasil.

2015 - Brazil hosted the 10th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) on the theme “Evolution of Internet Governance: Empowering Sustainable Development.”

At the ceremony of the National Pact to Combat to Human Rights Violations on the Internet, the Ministry of Education launched an initiative called #HumanizaRedes. The program provides educational material to school systems to disseminate best practices of prevention of human rights violations on the Internet. In addition, it allows mapping and investigating complaints made online, with special attention to the protection of children and adolescents. Shortly after the launch of #HumanizaRedes, Brazil’s President, Dilma Roussef, met with Mark Zuckerberg to discuss the program and Facebook’s Internet.org iniative, which has a dedicated focus in South America.

Brazilian Internet Steering Committee

Since 1995 the Committee has been the authority on strategic directives related to the use, development and integration of Internet services within Brazil.

Brazilian Ministry of Education

The ministry provides guidance for parents, teachers and children and contains a variety of resources on a range of education-related topics.

Center of Studies on Information and Communication Technologies

Publishes surveys and reports on the use of ICT and the Internet in Brazil, with information and analysis dating from 2005 to 2012.

Childhood Brazil

A national organization part of the World Childhood Foundation. Its mission in Brazil has been strategically working to fight sexual violence against children and adolescents. As part of their special projects they have a safe online surfing program to protect children and adolescents against online abuse.

Computer Emergency Response Team

This group maintained by the executive branch of the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. It undertakes awareness-raising activities about security issues and handles reports and incident notification. Internet safety information on a variety of topics is available through its online Internet Security Guidebook.

Dia Segura Internet (Safer Internet Day)

Operated regionally by SaferNet, this website updates annually with content relating to the theme of the year’s Safer Internet Day, held annually in February.

Fundaçao Bradesco (The Bradesco Foundation)

An NGO providing education and vocational training for children, teenagers and adults in underserved communities throughout Brazil its virtual classroom called [email protected] Virtual.

Fundaçao Victor Civita (Victor Civita Foundation)

A nonprofit organization which exists to promote improvements in education, teacher training and influence education policy. It also carries out and commissions research relating to education in Brazil.

Helpline

A program of Safernet, Helpline provides support to Brazilian children are distressed about something they have encountered online. Support can be obtained by email or chat, and children can receive online counseling sessions with a team of psychologists. It also provides advice and support to parents or teachers who know of or work with children who have experienced distressing incidents online.

Instituto Interamericano del Niño, la Niña y Adolescente (INN)

A specialized body of the Organization of American States (OAS) on children and adolescents policy that provides guidance to the different states on how they must assume protection.

Internet Segura (Safer Internet)

This organization was formed in 2005 through the collaboration of the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee and industry partners. The portal offers access to a range of Internet safety advice and contains information for parents on how to keep their children safe online and how to teach safe behaviors.

INTERPOL

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries. Its mission is to enable police forces to collaborate globally to fight crime in the Internet age. Three areas of focus are crimes against children (with a focus on internet crimes and travelling sex offenders), cybercrime and human trafficking.

Latin American Network of Educational Portals (La Red Latinoamericana de Portales Educativos – RELPE)

Formed in 2004 by an agreement of the Ministries of Education from sixteen Latin American countries, a network of educational portals, allowing the collaboration and sharing of educational content between the member countries. It also provides for the construction of standards and methodologies of processes to position the network as a benchmark in the region and the world on collaborative management of educational content.

Latin American Network of ICT and Education (Red Iberoamericana de TIC y Educación – RIATE)

This organization promotes bilateral or multilateral cooperation for development through the exchange of information, initiatives and projects that promote the integration of ICT in education in 21 countries.

Nova Escola (New School)

This resource contains a wealth of educational resources on all curriculum subjects, including a section on the use of ICT in the classroom. Materials are split by subject and age of child and comprise teaching materials, video content and other resources.

One Laptop per Child (OLPC)

A nonprofit organization launched by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, whose aim to empower the world’s poorest children through education by providing a low cost laptops.

SaferNet

A non-governmental organization which works with the Federal Public Ministry to educate the public about Internet safety issues, as well as providing a means for the anonymous reporting of illegal content. One of its services is HelpLine, which offers psychological support to children and adolescents in risk and gives advice to parents, educators and social workers.

The Interactive Generations Forum

A nonprofit organization which mission is to promote the use of technology to improve people’s lives. It was founded in 2008 by Telefónica, the University of Navarra and the Inter-American Organization (OUI). The Forum seeks to understand the impact of technology on children aged between 6 - 18 in Latin America, to provide educational resources for that age group and to educate through its own programs.

Unidos pela Infância (United for Children)

A resource of SaferNet, this website provides a central portal which directs users to the most appropriate website from SaferNet and other organizations dedicated to child protection in Brazil.

Victor Cevita Foundation (FVC)

A nonprofit organization working to improve the quality of education in Brazil, providing support and resources to teachers and influencing national policies. The FVC provides a range of materials for different types of lessons on its New School website, including an in-depth section on utilizing technology as a teaching tool at all levels of schooling.

The Realities of Cyber Parenting: What Pre-teens and Teens Are Up To Online (2015)

Family Online Safety Institute and Intel Security

This global study examined the online behaviors and social networking habits of pre-teens and teens aged between 8 and 16 years old, as well as looking at the concerns of parents.

Protecting Children from Cybercrime (2015)

Simone dos Santos Lemos Fernandes, Legal Consultant, Global Forum on Law Justice and Development (GFLJD), Legal Vice Presidency, World Bank

This report studies different Latin American countries’ legislation on the prevention and combat of violence against children on the internet. It also identifies gaps and good practices on the protection of children from cybercrime.

Report Education for All in Brazil 2000 - 2015 (2015)

World Education Forum - Brazil

This report responds to UNESCO’s invitation to its members to assess progress made since 2000 towards achieving education for all (EFA).

Sexual exploitation of children in Brazil: putting a spot on the problem (2014)

Marcel Hazeu and Franz van Kranen

This investigation explores the different aspects of sexual exploitation of children in Brazil. It was commissioned by the organizations Terre des Hommes, Plan, ECPAT and Free a Girl because of the difficulties to help when there is lack of knowledge.

Deconstructing Cyber Security in Brazil: Threats and Responses (2014)

Gustavo Diniz, Robert Muggah and Misha Glenny

This paper considers the evolution and implications of this securitized turn in the management of Brazil’s cyber-landscape. It talks about national priorities, the state’s legal and programmatic responses, dilemmas that arise from a heavily militarized approach to cyber-security. Plus the challenges of cyber-governance and security in Brazil.

Reducing violence against children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (2014)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

Reducing violence agains children, with special focus on sexual exploitation of children and child sex tourism. (2014)

The Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT

This is a program by the Netherlands, Defence for Children and ECPAT, which objective is to reduce violence against children, with special attention to child sexual exploitation and child sex tourism.

The commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Latin America (2014)

ECPAT International

This report studies the different forms of sexual exploitation of children inLatin America. Furthermore, it highlights the new emerging trends and how Latin america is addressing this phenomena

Children’s Rights in the Digital Age (2014)

A. Third, D. Bellerose, U. Dawkins, E. Keltie, K. Pihl

This study found unequal access to digital media among youth from 16 countries, among other key findings on children's digital usage.

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI) (2013)

Microsoft

The survey, Computing Safety Index, measures the steps people report taking to protect their computers, mobile phones, and info online in the categories of foundational, technical and behavioral.

Risks and safety on the internet: Comparing Brazilian and European children (2013)

Barbosa, A., O’Neill, B., Ponte, C., Simões, J.A., Jereissati, T.,

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

Risks and Safety on the Internet comparing Brazilian and European Results (2013)

Alexandre Barbosa, Brian O’Neill, Cristina Ponte, José Alberto Simões, Tatiana Jereissati

This study compares the results of the survey of Brazilian children and their parents/guardians, carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering. Using the same methodology as the EU Kids Online research which has been carried out as part of the EU's Safer Internet Program, the results from Brazil are compared with those from Europe.

ICT Kids Online Brazil 2012 (2013)

Brazilian Internet Steering Committee

The survey covers a range of topics and also makes comparisons between Brazil, Portugal and Europe.

TIC Education 2012. Survey on the Use of Information and Communication Technologies in Brazilian Schools (2013)

Brazilian Internet Steering Committee

This annual report examines the current state of ICT within the country's education system and some of the challenges which are faced in increasing ICT use in schools.

ICT education, survey on the use of information and communication technologies in Brazilian schools (2013)

UNESCO

This annual report examines the current state of ICT within the country's education system and some of the challenges which are faced in increasing ICT use in schools.

Brazil - Significant Advancement (2013)

United Sates Department of Labor’s Bureau of International Labor Affairs

This is a report on the significants advancements of Brazil in 2013 on its effort to eliminate the worst forms of child labor.

Brazil 2013 Human Rights Report (2013)

United Sates Department of Labor’s Bureau of International Labor Affairs

This is a report on the most significant abuses of Human Rights in Brazil in 2013.

Data from Disque-Denúncia (2013)

Disque-Denúncia

Disque-Denúncia and the Ministry for Human Rights presents the data on the children and adolescents’ rights violations reported through the National Disque-Denúncia (Hotline)

Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MCSI). (2013)

Microsoft

This annual survey of more than 10,000 adults in 20 countries around the world creates the data for the MCSI, which measures the actions that consumers take to help keep themselves and their families safe online.

National Web Based Child Helpline: the Brazilian approach to keeping children safe online (2012)

SaferNet Brasil

This presentations explains the the role of SaferNet on helping children in Brazil throughout their HelpLine.

Surveys of CETIC (2012)

UNESCO Center and CETIC.br

The Center of Studies on Information and Communication Technologies (CETIC.br) has consolidated its position as a reference center for the production of indicators and statistics on the use of information and communication technologies in Brazil. It publishes periodic specialized surveys and reports on the use of information and communications technologies – ICTs and the Internet by several segments of society.

Digital technologies meet the challenges of inclusive education in Latin America: some examples of good practices (2012)

NU. CEPAL, European Commission

The publication includes a series of studies on policies and programs to integrate digital technologies into education in various Latin American countries. The document also presents eight cases of good practices in ICTs that can be used in the Latin American school system to contribute to inclusion and reduce social inequalities.

Cyberbullying: Incidência e sua relação com as representações de si em adolescentes. (2012)

Thais Cristina Leite Bozza, Luciene Regina Paulino Tognetta

This survey of Brazilian children between the ages of ten and fourteen shows that 17% have been victims of cyberbullying at least once. Of these, 13% were insulted by the cell and the remaining texts and pictures sent by e-mail or via social networking sites 87%.

ICT IN EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN A regional analysis of ICT integration and e-readiness (2012)

UNESCO Institute for Statistics

UNESCO Institute for Statistics, based on survey responses from 38 countries reveals the extent to which factors such as education policy, teacher training, and infrastructure drive or hamper the integration of ICTs in schools.

Small World, Big Responsibility: The UK’s role in the global trade in children (2012)

Erika Hall, Phillippa Lei

This report preset information on the different forms of child exploitation. Its purpose is to raise awareness to this global issue.

The Internet in Brazil: E-Progress and E-Censorship in Latin America’s Poster Child (2012)

Alejandro Sanchez

This article explores different aspects of internet usage as its spreads constantly in Brazil.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey. (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Worldwide Online Bullying Survey (2012)

Microsoft

This survey explored children’s experience of online bullying in 25 countries across the globe.

Safety and Security on the Internet Challenges and Advances in Member States (2011)

World Health Organization

Evaluation of public health threat presented by the Internet in every Member States.

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and the Internet (2011)

Inter American Children’s Instirute

This is a report to the Organization of American States on the situation of the member states in the issue of commercial sexual exploitation and the impact of internet in their lives.

Online Child Sexual Abuse Content: The Development of a Comprehensive, Transferable International Internet Notice and Takedown System (2011)

Internet Watch Foundation

Report analyzes the legislative frame in that regulates inlines child sexual abuse content.

Computers in Schools: Why governments Should do their Homework (2011)

Inter-American Development Bank

This chapter is a comparison of the Latin American governments include ICT in their educational programs.

2009 Human Rights Report: Brazil (2010)

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor

This U.S. Department of State document is a report on the violations and actions of the Brazilian Government in the subject of Human Rights.

2010 Norton Online Family Report (2010)

Norton by Symantec

The report reveals how children are spending more time online and have had more negative online experiences than parents realize. It highlights different approaches taken by families globally and uncovers the emotional impact of children’s negative online experiences.

Los desafíos de las TIC para el cambio educativo (2009)

Roberto Carneiro, Juan Carlos Toscano and Tamara Díaz

This is a collective Inter-American educational program which goals are projected until the year 2021. It analyses the challenges of the new era of education and the importance of incorporating ICT on it.

Monitoring report on Education for All, 2008. Education For All by 2015. Will We Make It? (2008)

Angela Maria Rabelo Ferreira Barreto, Claudio Oliveira Arantes, Regina Lúcia Couto de Melo

This report is on the country's progress towards the EFA 2015 goals. It highlights some of the challenges which need to be overcome and gives an update on progress to date.

This section contains details of the country’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

  • Article 138, Penal Code. Slander. Imposes a penalty of imprisonment for between six months and two years plus a fine for anyone who makes a false statement about another person.
  • Article 139, Penal Code. Defamation. States that anyone who damages another person’s reputation by defamation will be liable to imprisonment for between three months to one year and a fine.
  • Article 140, Penal Code. Insult. Imposes a penalty of imprisonment for between one and six months, and a fine, for anyone who insults the dignity or decency of another person.
  • Article 141, Penal Code. Common Provisions. States that the penalties prescribed for slander, insult and defamation will be increased by one third if the offense is committed in the presence of several persons, or if its dissemination is facilitated, among other criteria.
  • Article 213, Penal Code. Rape. This Article defines the crime of rape and states that the usual penalty is between six and ten years’ imprisonment. If the crime results in serious injury or the victim is aged between fourteen and eighteen years of age, the penalty increases to between eight and twelve years’ imprisonment. If the crime results in the death of the victim, the penalty increases to between twelve and 30 years’ imprisonment.
  • Article 216-A, Penal Code. Harassment. States that coercing someone into giving sexual favors by means of exerting influence over them which is due to their position of authority over the victim or where they are a relative is a crime. The punishment is imprisonment for between one and two years but if the victim is under the age of eighteen, the term of imprisonment is increased by up to a third.
  • Article 217-A, Penal Code. Rape of Vulnerable Persons. States that having sexual intercourse with a child under the age of fourteen is a crime punishable by imprisonment for between eight and fifteen years. The same penalty applies where the victim is unable to consent by reason of disability or lack of mental capacity. If the act results in serious injury to the victim, the penalty increases to between ten and twenty years’ imprisonment. If the act results in the death of the victim, the penalty is increased to between twelve and 30 years’ imprisonment.
  • Article 218, Penal Code. Corruption of Minors. Defines the crime of inducing a child under the age of fourteen to satisfy the lust of another. The penalty is between two and five years’ imprisonment.
  • Article 218-A, Penal Code. Satisfying One’s Lust in the Presence of Children or Adolescents. States that it is a crime to practice sexual intercourse or a sexual act in the presence of a child under the age of fourteen, or to induce the child to witness such acts, for the gratification of either party. The penalty is a term of imprisonment of between two and four years.
  • Article 218-B, Penal Code. Facilitating Prostitution or Other Forms of Sexual Exploitation of Vulnerable Persons. States that it is a crime to force, induce or facilitate prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation involving a child under the age of eighteen or a person who is unable to consent by reason of disability or lack of mental capacity. The penalty is imprisonment for between four and ten years. If the crime was committed with a financial motive, a fine will also be imposed. The same penalties apply where the victim is aged between fourteen and eighteen. The owner, manager or person responsible for the place where such acts are carried out may also be prosecuted under this section and face the same penalties. Upon conviction, the owner or operator’s license to operate the establishment in question would be revoked.
  • Article 226, Penal Code. Aggravated Penalties. This section states that penalties are increased by a quarter if two or more offenders are involved in the commission of the crime. The penalties are increased by half if the offender is a spouse, relative, guardian, employer, teacher of person in a position of responsibility over the victim.
  • Article 227, Penal Code. To Induce Someone to Satisfy the Lust of Others. The penalty for the crime is between one and three years’ imprisonment. This rises to between two and five years where the victim is between the ages of fourteen and eighteen or if the perpetrator is a close relative, guardian, teacher or someone to whom care of the victim has been entrusted. If the crime is committed with the use of violence, threats or fraud, the penalty increases to between two and eight years’ imprisonment. If the crime was committed with a financial motive a fine will also be imposed.
  • Article 228, Penal Code. Facilitating the Prostitution or Other Forms of Sexual Exploitation. States that it is a crime to induce someone to enter into prostitution or to hinder or obstruct them from leaving it. The penalty for this is between two and five years’ imprisonment and a fine. If the perpetrator is the stepfather, stepmother, sister, stepchild, spouse, partner, friend, teacher, guardian or has been entrusted with the care of the victim, the penalty is between three and eight years’ imprisonment. If the crime is created with the use of violence, threats or fraud the penalty increases to between four and ten years’ imprisonment. If the crime was committed with a financial motive a fine will also be imposed.
  • Article 231, Penal Code. International Trafficking of Persons for the Purposes of Sexual Exploitation. Defines the crime of facilitating entry into the country of someone who will engage in prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation, or removing someone from the country who will engage in such acts abroad. The penalty is between three and eight years’ imprisonment. The same penalty applies to anyone who knowingly procures, solicits or purchases the trafficked person or who transports, transfers or houses the victim. If the victim is under the age of eighteen or a person who is unable to consent by reason of disability or lack of mental capacity. the penalty is increased by half. The same penalty applies if the perpetrator is the stepfather, stepmother, sister, stepchild, spouse, partner, friend, teacher, guardian or has been entrusted with the care of the victim. If the crime was committed with a financial motive a fine will also be imposed.
  • Article 231-A, Penal Code. Domestic Trafficking in Persons for the Purpose of Sexual Exploitation. Defines the crime of promoting or facilitating the movement of someone within the borders of the country to enable the practice of prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation. The penalty is between two and six years’ imprisonment. If the victim is under the age of eighteen or a person who is unable to consent by reason of disability or lack of mental capacity. the penalty is increased by half. The same penalty applies if the perpetrator is the stepfather, stepmother, sister, stepchild, spouse, partner, friend, teacher, guardian or has been entrusted with the care of the victim. If the crime was committed with a financial motive a fine will also be imposed.
  • Article 233, Penal Code. Obscenity. It is illegal to commit an obscene act in a public place or where it may be seen by the public. The penalty is between three months’ to one year’s imprisonment or a fine.
  • Article 234, Penal Code. Obscene Objects or Writings. This section states that it is unlawful to produce, import, export, acquire, possess for the purposes of dissemination or public exposure any obscene writings, drawings, paintings or other obscene object. The penalty is imprisonment for between six months and two years or a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who sells, distributes or offers to sell to the public any item covered by this section. It also applies to any exhibition, theatrical performance, showing or other performance of an obscene nature which is held in a public place or to which the public are admitted. The section also applies to audio broadcasts by radio which are made in a public place or are available to the public.
  • Law No. 8069, Article 240. States that it is illegal to produce, reproduce, photograph, film or record (by any means) explicit scenes of a sexual or pornographic nature which involve children or adolescents. The punishment is a term of imprisonment of between four and eight years and a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who participates in such scenes with the victim, or who facilitates, recruits, coerces or otherwise mediates the participation of a child or adolescent in such scenes. The punishment is increased by one third if the offender commits the crime in the exercise of public office, or on the pretext of exercising such office or functions. The same applies where the offender is a blood relative or related by marriage or adoption, a teacher or any other person in a position of authority over the victim.
  • Article 241. States that it is illegal to sell or advertise for sale any photographs, video or other depiction that contains scenes of explicit sexual activity or pornography involving children or adolescents. The penalty for this offense is between four and eight years’ imprisonment and a fine.
  • Article 241-A. Defines the offense of offering, exchanging, delivering, transmitting, publishing or disseminating by any means (including through a computer or telematic system) any photograph, video or other visual depiction that contains scenes of explicit sexual activity or pornography involving children or adolescents. The penalty for this offense is between three and six years’ imprisonment and a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who provides the means or services for the storage of such depictions covered by this section. It also applies to any person who accesses the images or depictions covered by this section by use of a computer network. The previous two definitions are punishable when the service provider has been officially notified of the matter and has failed to disable access to the illegal content covered by this section.
  • Article 241-B. States that it is illegal to sell, possess or store (by any means) any photograph, video or other depiction that contains images of explicit sexual activity or pornography involving a child or adolescent. The penalty is imprisonment for between one and four years and a fine. The punishment may be reduced by between one and two thirds if only a small amount of prohibited material is found. It is not a crime to possess or store such materials if the person concerned is holding them with the intention to notify the authorities and is a public servant in the exercise of their duties; a legally constituted member organization which includes the receiving, processing and forwarding of such matter to the authorities among its institutional purposes or the legal representative or officials of an ISP or computer network service provider, pending submission of the materials following a report to the police, prosecution or the judiciary. The material should be withheld from others outside these categories of person.
  • Article 241-C. Prohibits the simulation of the participation in a sexual or pornographic act by a child or adolescent through the tampering, manipulation, or modification of any photograph, video or other visual representation. It carries a penalty of between one and three years’ imprisonment and a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who sells, offers to sell, gives away, distributes, disseminates in any way, acquires, possesses or stores the material covered by this section.
  • Article 241-D. Defines the crime of communicating with a child for the purposes of enticing, luring or constraining a child to commit lewd acts. It carries a penalty of between one and three years’ imprisonment and a fine. The same penalty applies to anyone who facilitates or induces the child to access material containing explicit sexual scenes or pornography in order to accomplish lewd acts with the child. If anyone commits an explicit sexual or pornographic act in order to accomplish the acts covered in this section with a child they may also be prosecuted.
  • Article 241-E. Provides the definition of “scenes of explicit sexual acts or pornography” as any situation involving a child or adolescent in explicit sexual activities (real or simulated) or exposing the genitals of the child for primarily sexual purposes.
  • Article 244-B. Defines the crime of corrupting or facilitating the corruption of a person under the age of eighteen by engaging in criminal activities with them or inducing them to commit criminal acts. It carries a term of imprisonment of between one and four years. The penalty also applies to those who commit the crime through use of electronic media, the Internet or chat rooms.

The 2002 Brazilian programme to prevent and combat the trafficking of human beings was established by the Brazilian Government in conjunction with the International Centre for Migration Policy Development, the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women, Coalition Against Traffic in Women and End Child Prostitution. The program consisted on the combination of actions, and was a pilot project to combat the organized crime overseas.

In 2003, [Microsoft provided support to the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children[(http://www.icmec.org/press/microsoft-executive-joins-board-of-the-international-centre-for-missing-exploited-children/) (ICMEC), enabling it to conduct a series of training sessions for law enforcement agencies over five years, in countries including in Brazil. The sessions explained how to conduct successful investigations of computer-facilitated crimes against children and by the end of the program, 3,219 officers from 113 countries had benefited from the training.

In 2008, participants from over 125 countries gathered in Rio de Janeiro the World Congress III against Sexual Exploitation of Children and Adolescents. The discussion was about combating the increase of sexual exploitation of children and adolescents in all its dimensions, ranging from of trafficking, pornography and prostitution to rape and abuse.

The same year, the Brazilian Chamber of Deputies approved a law designed to improve the fight against the production, distribution and sale of child pornography and to criminalize the acquisition and possession of such material and other actions related to pedophilia on the Internet.

In 2012, Microsoft in partnership with NetClean created Microsoft PhotoDNA with the aim of rectifying the incredibly high amount of data associated with online child pornography. This groundbreaking technology was quickly adopted within law enforcement efforts to run proper investigations and better identify victims.

During the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil, the government, in partnership with the private sector, created Proteja Brasil (Protect Brazil), a mobile application. As part of the government’s plan to intensify programs that protect children and adolescents, the app facilitates complaints of violence and abuse. Brazil is the first country to have created an application of this nature.