Tasmania

Population

517,200

Population 0‑14

18.0%

Internet Users

66.8%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2009 – As of 2009, the Online Learning Network managed the delivery of online programs to students in Tasmania, and supported Learning Services, schools and teachers working online.

2010 – The Tasmanian eSchool was established. The school provides online and distance learning options for grades K-10, supported by in-person learning opportunities.

2012 – The education department released its ICT Cross Curricular Framework. It is taught over five standards which describe the years of schooling from Kindergarten through to Year 10. The plan includes the following focus areas: inquiring with ICT, creating with ICT, communicating with ICT, and operating ICT. Internet safety and netiquette standards are emphasized in the curriculum.

2016 – eLearning programs for 2016 include additional activities for gifted students or those interested in a specific subject area. The courses are typically delivered by an online teacher with the support and supervision of the students’ own school.

Anglicare

This Anglican organization provides services to children, young people and families, with focus areas on relationships, parenting and education.

Department of Education Tasmania

Responsible for providing all public education as well as vocational education and training, and adult education, the Department of Education also offers educational programs and online courses for students of all age levels through its eSchool. The department also provides online safety information for young children, kids, teens and parents.

Department of Health and Human Services

This department includes Child Health and Parenting Services, Child Protection Services, and Sexual Assault Support Services. It aims to maintain and improve the health and wellbeing of Tasmanians.

Digital Tasmania

This consumer action group advocates for the improvement of fixed, mobile and broadcast communications services in Tasmania through market competition and regulation in the interest of consumers.

Laurel House

This organisation provides therapy, support services and case management for survivors of sexual violence in North and North West Tasmania, including children. It also provides services to the families and friends of survivors, and offers community education and professional training on the issue.

Sexual Assault Support Service

SASS is a community based service in Southern Tasmania committed to providing support and information services to survivors of sexual assault, their support networks, professionals and the public. It provides counselling services, hotlines and case management to any child or adult who has been sexually abused at any time in their lives. Resources for child survivors of sexual abuse are divided into two age groups.

Tasmanian ICT Centre

This centre was established in 2006 by CSIRO with 30 researchers to improve the viability of the ICT industry in Tasmania. The centre receives funding from the company and the State government.

Tasmanian Task Force on Sexual Abuse

The task force was formed in 1989 to investigate the adequacy of services available to child victims of sexual abuse and the management of child sex offenders. It issued a report recommending that steps be taken to prevent children from being retraumatized by interviews, examinations and court appearances. The task force also suggested that government departments and independent agencies should train staff on preventing child abuse, among 41 other recommendations.

Tasmania Police

The State police department provides information to the public on cybercrime, computer attacks and online safety. Its Police in Schools program places police officers in schools throughout the state to build relationships between police and young people.

Tasmania Police and Community Youth Clubs

PCYC connects youth with police to foster positive relationships and create safe environments for at-risk youth. In 2015, it published a child safety handbook, which covered topics like bullying, online safety, mobile phone safety and child abuse.

Connecting All Tasmanians (2014)

Anglicare Tasmania

This study surveyed 750 low income Tasmanians to better understand their use of digital technology.

An Investigation into the Nationally Funded ICT-related Initiatives in Tasmania: 1996 to 2005 (2013)

D.R. Steer

This paper seeks to understand the perceptions, motivations and actions of key people involved in establishing and administering these publically funded ICT-related programs within Tasmania from1996 to 2005.

What Can You Learn in Three Minutes?: Critical Reflection on an Assessment Task that Embeds Technology (2009)

N.R. Brown

The paper critically examines an assessment task, undertaken by pre‐service science teachers, that integrates the use of technology with skill development.

Student Freeway Project Report (2002)

Department of Education Tasmania

This report finds that the research and development process has produced Tasmanian leadership in developing educational gateways.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

The age of consent in Tasmania is 17 years old.

  • Sex Industry Offences Act 2005. Section 9, Participation of children. This section states that a person must not procure, or otherwise cause or permit, a child to provide sexual services in a sexual services business. A person must not receive a fee or reward that he or she knows, or must reasonably be expected to know, is derived, directly or indirectly, from sexual services provided by a child in a sexual services business. The penalty for either offence is 15 years’ imprisonment. It is a defence to prove that the accused took all reasonable steps to determine the age of the person concerned, and the accused reasonably believed that the person concerned was 18 or older.
  • Sex Industry Offences Act 2005. Section 11, Children on premises. A self-employed sex worker must not, without reasonable excuse, permit a child to be on any premises used while sexual services are being provided on those premises. A person must not, without reasonable excuse, permit a child to be on any premises used by that person while he or she is receiving sexual services from a self-employed sex worker. The penalty for either crime is a fine not to exceed 20 penalty units.
  • Section 124, Criminal Code. Sexual intercourse with young person. This section defines the offence of having unlawful sexual intercourse with a person under 17 years old. The consent of a person against whom a crime is alleged to have been committed is a defence only when that person was 15 or older and the accused person was not more than five years older than that person, or that person was 12 or older and the accused person was not more than three years older.
  • Section 125, Criminal Code. Person permitting unlawful sexual intercourse with young person on premises. This section states that any person who is the owner or occupier of any premises, or controls or manages any premises and who induces or knowingly permits any person under 17 years old to be in or on the premises for the purpose of having unlawful sexual intercourse is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 125A, Criminal Code. Maintaining sexual relationship with young person. A person who maintains a sexual relationship with a young person who is under the age of 17 years, and to whom he or she is not married, is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 125B, Criminal Code. Indecent act with a young person. This section states that any person who does any indecent act with, or directed at, another person who is under the age of 17 years is guilty of a crime. The consent of a person against whom a crime is alleged to have been committed is a defence only when that person was 15 or older and the accused person was not more than five years older than that person, or that person was 12 or older and the accused person was not more than three years older.
  • Section 125C, Criminal Code. Procuring unlawful sexual intercourse with person under 17 years. A person who procures a person under 17 years old to have unlawful sexual intercourse with another person or vice versa is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 127A, Criminal Code. Aggravated sexual assault. A person who unlawfully and indecently assaults another person by penetration to the vagina, genitalia or anus of that other person by any body part other than the penis, or by an inanimate object, is guilty of this crime.
  • Section 178, Criminal Code. Ill-treatment of children. Any person over the age of 14 who, having custody or control over a child under 14 years old, wilfully ill-treats, neglects, abandons, or exposes such child, or causes such child to be ill-treated, neglected, abandoned, or exposed in a manner likely to cause such child unnecessary suffering or injury to health, is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 185, Criminal Code. Rape. This section states that any person who has sexual intercourse with another person without that person’s consent is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 186, Criminal Code. Abduction. This section states that any person who, by force, takes away or detains another person against that person’s will with intent that the other person be married to, or have sexual intercourse with, any person, is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 189, Criminal Code. Abduction of young persons. Any person who unlawfully takes away, or causes to be taken away, an unmarried person under the age of 17 years out of the possession and against the will of a parent of that person or a person having the lawful charge or care of that person, is guilty of this crime.
  • Section 190, Criminal Code. Defences in abduction of young persons. It is a defence to section 189 to prove that the accused person did not know, or did not have reasonable grounds for believing, that the young person was in the lawful charge of the person out of whose possession the young person was taken. It is not a defence to prove that the young person suggested or consented to being taken away or that the accused person believed on reasonable grounds that the young person was of or above the age of 17 years.
  • Section 191, Criminal Code. Abduction of children: Harbouring an abducted child. Any person who unlawfully, by force or fraud takes away, or decoys or entices away, or detains, any child under the age of 14 years, with intent to deprive any parent, guardian, or other person having the lawful charge or care of such child, of the possession of such child, or with intent to steal any article on the person of such child, is guilty of a crime. Any person who receives or harbours any such child, knowing it to have been so taken, decoyed, or enticed away, or detained, is guilty of a crime. It is a defence to prove that the accused acted upon a claim of right to possession of such child, is the mother of such child if the child is illegitimate, or acted in good faith upon a claim that he is the father of the child if the child is illegitimate.
  • Section 257B, Criminal Code. Computer-related fraud. A person who, with intent to defraud, (a) destroys, damages, erases or otherwise manipulates data stored in or used in connection with a computer; or (b) introduces, records or stores in, a computer or system of computers by any means data for the purpose of (i) destroying, damaging, erasing or altering other data stored in that computer or that system of computers; or (ii) interfering with, interrupting or obstructing the lawful use of that computer or that system of computers or the data stored in that computer or system of computers, is guilty of this crime.
  • Section 257C, Criminal Code. Damaging computer data. A person who intentionally and without lawful excuse (a) destroys, damages, erases or alters data stored in a computer; or (b) interferes with, interrupts or obstructs the lawful use of a computer, a system of computers or any part of a system of computers or the data stored in that computer or system of computers, is guilty of this crime.
  • Section 257D, Criminal Code. Unauthorized access to a computer. A person who, without lawful excuse, intentionally gains access to a computer, system of computers or any part of a system of computers, is guilty of a crime.
  • Section 257E, Criminal Code. Insertion of false information as data. A person who dishonestly introduces into, or records or stores in, a computer or a system of computers, by any means, false or misleading information as data is guilty of a crime.

2005 – With the passage of the Criminal Code Amendment (Child Exploitation) Bill 2005, laws regarding child exploitation material were added to the criminal code. This included the production, distribution, possession and accessing of child exploitation material, as well as involving people under 18 years old in its production. Provisions were also added to criminalize the online grooming of people under 17 years old. All of the aforementioned laws take into account the use of electronic data and computers to facilitate these offences.