Queensland

Population

4,780,000

Population 0‑14

20.5%
* Statistics provided by CIA.gov, Internet World Stats and GSMA Intellligence

2005 – The government of Queensland began a trial of the Computers for Teachers program, providing eligible teachers with free laptops as part of their commitment to modernizing of learning and teaching. State educators working at least two days a week, full-time in a permanent position could apply for laptops.

2007 – Queensland began its 2007-2011 Information & Knowledge Strategic Plan. The plan focused on integrating technology to engage students, improving individual learning opportunities and making the most of ICT investments.

The same year, the Computers for Teachers program was officially rolled-out.

2010 – The 2010-2014 Information & Knowledge Strategic Plan began. The plan continues the goals of the 2007-2011 plan and is driven by the Toward Q2 through ICT Strategy.

Also in 2010, the Computers for Teachers replacement schedule started.

2011 – The Smart Classrooms 2011-2014 strategy began, providing direction for using ICT for its learning and business potentials. Areas of action included working digitally, developing professionals, enabling learners and harnessing the enterprise program.

The Websites for Schools initiative started. The program offers state schools a free and easy solution for making websites which provide information for current and prospective parents. Participating schools take part in a training program.

2012 – The Digital Practice Guide for 2012-2014 set the following goals: facilitating eLearning opportunities, connecting with digital tools and resources, collaborating in digital environments, and reflecting on eLearning culture.

2013 – The Daniel Morcombe Child Safety Curriculum became available for all students in Queensland. The curriculum aims to teach children about personal safety and awareness, including online and mobile phone safety. Classroom lessons are for Prep to Year 2, Years 3 to 6, and Years 7 to 9 students.

2014 – Queensland’s Digital Strategy 2014-2017 was rolled out. The plan aims to support businesses and education by improving improving the delivery of high quality, cost effective ICT. Its five goals are as follows: delivering digital services, streamlining business processes, bridging the digital divide, providing safe and secure ICT, and empowering local decision-making.

The same year, Queensland began a formal Bring Your Own Device program as the federally funded free laptop program came to an end. Public high school students are now required to bring tablets or laptops to school.

2016 – All Queensland school staff and students can download multiple free copies of Microsoft Office 2016 to their personal computers and mobile devices. Subscriptions last as long as an individual is a student or staff member in the state school system.

This initiative coincides with the beginning of Australia’s digital learning curriculum. Under the new curriculum, students are to develop digital literacy skills to become prepared for the 21st century workforce.

Benevolent Society

This group, which was Australia’s first charity, provides services for youth in the foster care system and adults interested in becoming foster parents. The group addresses mental health and education issues.

Child Protection Week in Queensland

Child Protection Week promotes the value of children and draws attention to child abuse and neglect issues. Its website provides information and resources for children, adults and schools.

Children and Youth Research Centre

This centre within the Queensland University of Technology focuses on enhancing opportunities for Australian children and youth. Research areas include the rights and welfare of young people, health and wellbeing, child and youth cultures, and environments for work and play.

Department of Education and Training

This department oversees public education in Queensland. It provides resources on cybersafety, bullying, and ICT in schools.

Police Citizens Youth Club

This nonprofit organization maintains 54 clubs in Queensland for children and youth. Each club is managed by a Queensland Police Sergeant, aiming to encourage positive relationships between officers and young people. The club has a crime prevention component.

Queensland Police Service

The state’s police department includes information on E-Crime, specifically online shopping, credit card fraud, computer hacking, offensive internet content and children’s internet use.

Safe and Well Online

This research project brings together University of South Australia, University of Western Sydney, Queensland University of Technology and Zuni to develop and evaluate an online social marketing framework to promote behavior changes towards cybersafety and wellness among young people.

The Learning Place

Queensland’s e-learning platform provides access to digital tools and resources, and also acts as a networking space for teachers and students. It supports the Smart Classroom strategy for eSpaces, digital resources and digital pedagogy.

School Policies on Bullying and Cyberbullying: Perspectives Across Three Australian States (2016)

C. Chalmers, M.A. Campbell, B.A. Spears, D. Butler, D. Cross, P. Slee, S. Kift

This study suggests that there was some lack of information about bullying and cyberbullying in schools, which could affect the subsequent development, dissemination and sustainability of school anti-bullying policies.

Children and Youth Research Centre Annual Report (2015)

Queensland University of Technology

This report provides an overview of the Centre's research activities over the past year.

Media and Information Literacy at Queensland University of Technology and in Australia (2013)

M. Dezuanni, H. Hughes

This paper describes media literacy projects for all ages taking place at the Queensland University of Technology, from programs for low socioeconomic level kindergarten classrooms to developing online courses.

ACT to Improve ICT Use for Learning: A Synthesis of Studies of Teacher Confidence in Using ICT in Two Queensland Schooling Systems (2008)

R. Jamieson-Proctor, G. Finger

This study finds that ICT initiatives are having less than the desired result in two Queensland systems.

Measuring Student Use of ICT: A Summary of Findings of ICT Use in Queensland Catholic Schools (2008)

R. Jamieson-Proctor, G. Finger

This study measures the use of ICT in 130 Catholic schools in Queensland.

ICT Integration and Teachers' Confidence in Using ICT for Teaching and Learning in Queensland State Schools (2006)

R. Jamieson-Proctor, P.C. Burnett

Based on a survey of Queensland teachers, this study found that female teachers are significantly less confident than their male counterparts in using ICT with students for teaching and learning, and there is evidence of significant resistance to using ICT to align curriculum with new times and new technologies.

Queensland Police Stings in Online Chat Rooms (2005)

T. Krone

This paper reports the experience of Queensland police in the investigation of predatory behaviour by men seeking sex with children through online chat rooms.

Voyage Forward for Queensland: Unauthorised Taking of Photographs and Making of Film and its Subsequent Publication on the Internet (2005)

K.J. Burton

The paper argues that more specific laws are necessary for voyeurism in the Internet age.

Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Home Internet Usage Patterns in Central Queensland (2003)

W.J. Taylor, G. Zhu, J. Dekkers, S. Marshall

This paper identifed associations between demographic and socioeconomic factors and home Internet use patterns in the Central Queensland region.

The Youth Internet Radio Network: A Research Project to Connect Youth Across Queensland through Music, Creativity and ICT (2003)

J. Hartley, G.N. Hearn, J.A. Tacchi, M. Foth

This paper proposes that interactive technologies can combine with training and enterprise development, and young people’s desires for content creation, to establish a network of users across differing geographical and social ecologies, creating new cultural forms and economic outcomes.

Limitation Periods in Child Sex Abuse Cases in Queensland: Recent Cases Provide both Hope and Caution (2003)

B. Mathews

This paper focuses on the legal process for child sex abuse cases in Queensland.

This section contains details of the state’s laws as they relate to sexual offenses, children and the use of the Internet in the commission of criminal activity. Where possible, sentence details have been given, including whether an increased custodial penalty is imposed where the victim is a child.

In Queensland, the age of consent for sodomy is 18 and the age of consent for all other sexual acts is 16.

  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 208. Unlawful sodomy. A person commits this crime if he sodomises a person under 18 years old or with an impairment of the mind, permits a male person under 18 or with an impairment of the mind to sodomise him/her. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment. For an offense other than an attempt, an offender is liable to life imprisonment if the crime is committed against a child under 12 years old. Mistake of age can be a defense If the child is 12 or older and the accused person believed on reasonable grounds that the child was 18 or older.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 210. Indecent treatment of children under 16. This section defines the offense of unlawfully and indecently dealing with a child under 16 years old. This includes procuring a child to commit an indecent act, permitting himself/herself to be indecently dealt with by a child, exposing a child to an indecent act, exposing a child to indecent material without legitimate reason, or taking any indecent photographs or records of an indecent visual image of a child without legitimate reason. If the child is 12 or older, the offender is liable to imprisonment for 14 years; if the child is under 12 years old, the offender is liable to 20 years’ imprisonment. Mistake of age, if proven, can be a defense If the child is 12 or older and the accused person believed on reasonable grounds that the child was 16 or older.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 215. Carnal knowledge with or of children under 16. Any person who has or attempts to have unlawful carnal knowledge with a child under 16 is guilty of this offense. If the child is 12 or older, the offender is liable to 14 years’ imprisonment; if the child is under 12, the offender is liable to life imprisonment, or 14 years in the case of an attempt to have unlawful carnal knowledge. Mistake of age, if proven, can be a defense If the child is 12 or older and the accused person believed on reasonable grounds that the child was 16 or older.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 217. Procuring young person etc. for carnal knowledge. This section defines the offense of procuring a child to engage in carnal knowledge, where procure means to knowingly entice or recruit for the purpose of sexual exploitation. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 218A. Using internet etc. to procure children under 16. This section states that any adult who uses electronic communication with intent to procure a person under 16 years old for sexual exploitation, or a person the adult believes to be under 16, to engage in a sexual act commits this crime. The maximum penalty is 10 years’ imprisonment, unless the child is under 12 years old, the adult believes the child is under 12 years old, the offense involves the adult meeting the child or going to a place with the intent of meeting the child, in which case the offender is liable to 14 years’ imprisonment. It is a defense to prove the adult believed on reasonable grounds that the person was at least 16 years.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 218B. Grooming children under 16. This section states that any adult who engages in conduct with a person under 16 years old, or who they believe is under 16 years old, with the intent to facilitate the procurement of a sexual act or expose to indecent matter commits this offense. The maximum penalty is five years’ imprisonment, unless the child is under 12 years old or the offender believes the child is under 12 years old, in which case the offender is liable to 10 years imprisonment. It is a defense to prove the adult believed on reasonable grounds that the person was at least 16 years.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 219. Taking child for immoral purposes. This section states that any person who takes away, entices or detains a child for the purpose of committing an offense under section 208, 210 or 215 is guilty of a crime. If the child is 12 or older, the offender is liable to 10 years’ imprisonment. If the child is under 12, the offender is liable to 14 years imprisonment, or life imprisonment if the offense where the proscribed act is an offense under section 208 or 215. If the proscribed act is defined in section 208 and the child is 12 or older, it is a defense to prove that the accused believed the child was 18 or older. If the proscribed act is defined in section 210 or 215 and the child is 12 or older, it is a defense to prove that the accused believed, on reasonable grounds, that the child was 16 or older.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 228A. Involving child in making child exploitation material. It is an offense to involve a child in the making of child exploitation material. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 228B. Making child exploitation material. It is an offense to make child exploitation material. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 228C. Distributing child exploitation material. It is an offense to distribute child exploitation material. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 228D. Possessing child exploitation material. A person who knowingly possesses child exploitation material commits this offense. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22, Section 229B. Maintaining a sexual relationship with a child. This section states that an adult who maintains an unlawful sexual relationship with a child under the prescribed age commits this crime, with a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. An unlawful sexual relationship is defined as involving more than one unlawful sexual act over any period of time. If the child was at least 12 when the crime was alleged to have been committed, it is a defense to prove the adult believed on reasonable grounds that the child was at least the prescribed age.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 22A, Section 229L. Permitting young person etc. to be at place used for prostitution. This section states that a person who knowingly causes or permits a person who is not an adult or a person with a mental impairment to be at a place used for the purposes of prostitution by two or more prostitutes commits this offense. The maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • Criminal Code, Chapter 37, Section 408E. Computer hacking and misuse. This section defines the offense of using a restricted computer without the consent of the computer’s controller. The maximum penalty is two years’ imprisonment. If the person causes or intends to cause detriment or damage, or gains or intends to gain a benefit, the person is liable to imprisonment for five years. If the person causes detriment or damage or obtains a benefit to the value of more than $5000, or intends to commit an indictable offense, he/she is liable to 10 years’ imprisonment. It is a defense under this section to prove that the use of the computer was authorised, justified or excused by law.

1997 – Task Force Argos, a specialized team within the Queensland Police Department, was founded. The task force investigates online child sexual exploitation and abuse.

2003 – Between 2003 and 2004, Task Force Argos completed 25 investigations into online grooming. The investigations involved task force officers posing as 13- to 16-year-old girls to uncover adults who sought to procure children online for sexual activity.

2004 – The Child Protection (Offender Reporting) Act 2004 established the Queensland component of the Australian Child Protection Offender Reporting scheme. The national scheme requires child sex offenders to inform police of their location and other personal information for a period of time after they are released into the community.

2010 – Task Force Argos began developing a platform to match child abuse images with solved and cold cases. The system was first built in 2005 by Canadian police and Microsoft developers and has since been implemented in other countries.

2014 – Legislation was passed to allow registered child sex offenders to report required information to the Queensland Police Service online.

2015 – A new Queensland Police Service task force, Orion, was established with a Palaszczuk Government investment of $3.2 million. Task Force Orion is to build the police department’s prior work to arrest and charge those who share and possess child exploitation material in Queensland. The funding will go towards improving access to IT applications for detectives to target child sex offenders, enhancing training for regionally based officers, increasing storage in the evidence database and working with the Crime and Corruption Commission.

2016 – Task Force Argos continued to investigate child sexual abuse on the internet, leading to arrests and punishment for offenders.